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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Arthur Jones

My Favorite Books and Films

From his autobiography,
" . . . And God Laughs" 


Many people have asked me which were my favorite books, and which films I liked best. But having read so many books, literally many thousands of them, and having seen thousands of films, it is not easy for me to answer such questions.


Books to Read

Mark Twain, particularly Huckleberry Finn, has long been a favorite of mine; and while many of his stories were intended for children, Huckleberry Finn was not. You will probably recognize everybody you ever knew therein.

Some, but not all of Edgar Allen Poe's published works; particularly the many shorter things that are not included in most of his supposedly complete works. You will have to search very carefully for these.

The Marquis de Sade is primarily considered to be a writer on the subject of sex; but he got in trouble and was thrown into prison for his political writing, with which most people are not familiar. Again, you will probably recognize every politician you ever heard of if you read that part of his work.

John D. McDonald's stories, particularly those that had a Mexican setting, are usually very well done, and are always interesting.

B. Traven's books and stories, one of which led to the film The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, probably the best film of all time, are also very accurate in regard to Mexico and the people living there.

Anything and everything that you can find on the subject of Chaka Zulu, truly one of the most remarkable men of all time.

Charles Lindberg's Wartime Journals. Sterling Seagrave's The Soong Dynasty. Anything about Nikola Tesla, who was probably the greatest scientist and inventor in history, but who remains unknown to most people today. A long out-of-print book by Waddill Catchings called Money, Men and Machines, an account of the early history of the automobile industry.

The Conquest of Mexico. The Path Between the Seas. The True Believer. And so many others that the list would extend to hundreds of pages; so my advice is to read everything you can lay your hands on; but also to be very selective about what you believe.


Films to See

Many of the earliest films were very bad: perhaps the worst being one that was called The Amazing Adventures of the Clutching Hand; but it was so bad that it is worth watching. Another early, and very bad, film that is worth watching was called Freaks; and the people used in that film really were freaks.

The first version of Trader Horn, produced about 1930, but not the later version that starred Robert Conrad. The earliest version of Mutiny on the Bounty, starring Clark Gable and Charles Laughton. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, mentioned above, certainly the best film Humphrey Bogart ever starred in.

Hell's Angels and Scarface, both produced by Howard Hughes in about 1930. The original Hunchback of Notre Dame. The earliest Frankenstein, but few if any of the later ones. All of the Will Rogers films and all of Wallace Beery's films.

All of the travel and adventure films produced by Martin and Osa Johnson, but none of those made by Frank Buck, all of which were utterly phony. The original King Kong, but not the later version. Jaws, but none of the sequels. Wings, the first winner of the Academy Award. Most of Charlie Chaplin's films.

Anything with both Mae West and W. C. Fields in it. I Can Get It For You Wholesale. Midnight Cowboy. True Grit, but not the sequels. Hole In The Wall, also released as The Big Carnival. The War of the Worlds.

The wartime version of the Memphis Belle, but not the later version. All Quiet on the Western Front. Lost Horizon. The General Died At Dawn. Suzie Wong. The Bridge on the River Kwai. The African Queen. A Tale of Two Cities. The original Dracula.

Again, a full list of the films that I enjoyed would be much too long; while a list of those that I did not enjoy would be much longer.

Films like Lawrence of Arabia and Papillon are sheer fantasy, based upon characters that never did any of the things credited to them.

And I never enjoyed the supposedly spectacular films made by Cecil B. DeMille and others; always believed that they had spent so much on props and sets that they then felt it was necessary to drag out these films in attempts to show the backgrounds, and thus made them boring.

Discuss this article | Text Version

Bill Sekerak

California, USA

I thought that this was very interesting when I read it and Arthur mentioned many of these books when I talked to him. The only thing he metnioned to me about movies was that he thought " Bonfire of The Vanities " was one of the worst films ever made although he really liked the book.

I talked to Inge , Arthur's last wife , in November of 2003 she told me that Arthur was reading Larry McMurtry and that Lonesome Dove was a big favorite of his and that he was reading a lot of spy novels ie. John Clancy.

Bill
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Not to get too far off topic, but if anyone is up for some really, really good suspense/spy novels, I can't possibly recommend Barry Eisler's stuff enough. I just finished reading his most recent, Killing Rain, on the way back from Idaho (there helping trainers prepare for their certification exam).

He has written four books so far, about an assassin named John Rain, which are easily as good, if not better than, anything I've read from Clancy, Ludlum, etc.

I'll have to add a few of Arthur's suggestions to my "to read" list.
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Nikola Tesla has a fascinating life story, thought provoking ideas and was an incredible man. I found it almost bizarre that he is not better known. Lindberg was my fathers? hero, there is a hell of a story there as well.

Samuel Clemens is my favourite writer by far.

Regards
Andrew
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LITA1981

Did Mr. Jones by any chance wrote ever
about the relationship of the glands
in the body and the recovery ability,
if so did he ever publish an article
about it.

Thank you,

Ronald Carhuas.
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Ellington Darden

Ronald,

I don't believe Jones ever wrote about the various glands and recovery ability. Sorry.

Ellington
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deadmanemailing

I saw Freaks years ago by chance on cable. Definitely unlike anything I'd seen before. Many of the actors suffered from genetic abnormalities that do not occur these days. Shrunken odd shaped heads.

Also agree on Chaka Zulu. The mini-series was very interesting with him creating the short spear and changing the style of African tribal warfare.
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Ciccio

deadmanemailing wrote:
I saw Freaks years ago by chance on cable. Definitely unlike anything I'd seen before. Many of the actors suffered from genetic abnormalities that do not occur these days. Shrunken odd shaped heads.



Be sure, they occur these days.
Some years ago I was with my son to the doctor and in the waiting room was one boy, aproximately the same age (7 or so) like mine, a little smaller (like most other kids are, we're a tall
family) BUT with a head only HALF the diameter(I said diameter!). It's an odd feeling to see such things and definetely difficult to try to behave absolutely normal.
Poor guy!


Franco
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AaronL

Anybody know how to actually buy this book?

I can't find it anywhere.

Thanks.
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BretC

New York, USA

AaronL wrote:
Anybody know how to actually buy this book?

I can't find it anywhere.

Thanks.


exercisecertification.com/books/Library/Arthur-Jones.html

Bret
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ryansergent

Kansas, USA

Check out the movie "El Mariachi"

Great movie and one of my all time picks. It was made with a very low budget but well done.

Ryan
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Bad Boy

Florida, USA

For those who give a darn!
One of my favorite book is "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand .
As a matter of fact I like all her books including Fountainhead.
Talking about load! It took me three month to get thru it.
I would recommend that everyone should sit down and read Atlas Shrugged. Trust me!
It had a great influence on my life.
Truthfully! I don't believe I would has had the successes that I have had if I had never picked it up at a yard sale 25 years ago.

Sonny WMD
God Bless our Troops
Also! Merry Christmas from High Springs Florida
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DTS

I wonder if Arthur will have the chance to see the new King Kong movie? I bet he would like it.
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chris mason

Virginia, USA

Dr. Darden, do you care for Ayn Rand's writing? Atlas Shrugged is one of my all-time favorite books.

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chris mason

Virginia, USA

Bad Boy wrote:
For those who give a darn!
One of my favorite book is "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand .
As a matter of fact I like all her books including Fountainhead.
Talking about load! It took me three month to get thru it.
I would recommend that everyone should sit down and read Atlas Shrugged. Trust me!
It had a great influence on my life.
Truthfully! I don't believe I would has had the successes that I have had if I had never picked it up at a yard sale 25 years ago.

Sonny WMD
God Bless our Troops
Also! Merry Christmas from High Springs Florida


Lol, I didn't even notice this when I made my post. I concur.

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bmacsys

Tesla is one of the giants. He is at the top of a very short list. We would be using DC like Thomas Edison wished and not AC if it weren't for Nikola Tesla.
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TimS_LexKY

Most recommended books on Tesla are:

"Tesla: Man Out of Time" by Margaret Cheney (probably out of print now) and
"TESLA: Master of Lightning" by Margaret Cheney and Robert Uth (a coffee-table sized hardbound book that Barnes & Noble had on sale last year for $10).

Very few films have been made on his life. Some of his electrical devices were used as props in the original "Frankenstein" and other horror classics. Tesla was also the original discoverer ("inventor") of radio; Marconi was a student of his, but hijacked the title as the inventor of radio.

Despite being the greatest scientist and inventor in U.S. history, conspiracy theories suggest that Tesla has been deliberately left out of history books for political reasons, since his advanced ideas have been appropriated by the government. He was the original mad scientist and seemed to receive advanced knowledge from otherworldly sources.

For example, his plans for a cloaking device, and time travel, were used during the Philadelphia Experiment, and are now being used for the HAARP project, weather modification, mind control, and other classified experiments.
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Joe Mullen

Florida, USA

The first question I ever asked Arthur Jones was: "Have you ever heard of Ayn Rand."

I asked that because his writing, talks, and discussions seemed to center on the "Objectivist" approach to life.

For me, his rational, no punches pulled, approach to life was enlightening, and inspirational. He is the best, most honest, most benevolent, employer I ever had, and I am thankful that his influence has changed my life forever.

"Long live the King."

Many thanks to Dr. Darden for keeping the flame alive.

Joe Mullen
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k38wood

Arthur once told me that he had read
every major work in World literature...
Wow! I was impressed. Considering how things were going down there at the time...I asked him if he had ever read
"Faust"...he turned and looked at me then said,"what did he write?" ...
Gosh, I loved that guy.
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Charles Coulter

New York, USA

What about some of the books that had influenced him the most in the training field? Its always interesting finding out what caught the eye of the masters.

Thanks in advance

Charles
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Ellington Darden

Charles,

I don't recall Arthur ever mentioning a single training book that he was influenced by. Knowing him, he'd probably supply you with a list of training books that did NOT influence him . . . and the list would be very long.

Ellington
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Charles Coulter

New York, USA

What about physiology/kinesiology/biomechanics, etc. based text books?

I asked originally as I was rereading Bob Peoples old training booklet, and as you may know he used negatives and static movements in his own training. Not to mention his design for performing negative movements. Thought there might be a link or influence.

Thanks again.

Charles
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Ellington Darden

Charles,

I do remember one book with a lot of anatomical drawings that Arthur liked. In fact, he gave me a copy of it. I listed it in the reference section of two of my early books, "Strength-Training Principles" and "How Your Muscles Work." Unfortunately, all my books are packed away so I don't have access to them right now.

Ellington
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Charles Coulter

New York, USA

Thanks, I will check them out as I have both of them.

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medici

Spain

Ellington Darden wrote:
Charles,

I don't recall Arthur ever mentioning a single training book that he was influenced by. Knowing him, he'd probably supply you with a list of training books that did NOT influence him . . . and the list would be very long.

Ellington


I doubt that anyone's bridging doing a culmulative bibliography of Irongame publications, specifically books. All of which is to say that by the time Jones started publishing in 1970 there just plain wasn't much to read about training, and within what was available most of it was junk!

Once I began training in 1959 I made it my business to read everything I could get my hands on - including discovery of that wonderful resource called "inter library loan". As a high school junior I had borrowing priveleges within the open stacks of San Jose State University, and even Stanford University Library at that time. My high school experience was heavily directed in the sciences, so learning to use research libraries occured at a young age.

Peter Karpovich was pretty much the dominant figure in print back then, an exercise physiologist - whose contribution was dispelling the commercialized myth that weights will make you "muscle bound". Otherwise there were a handful of books.

The real grist for the mill then as now was Iron Man Magazine. Weider and Hoffman were engaged in ugly open warfare. The Raders maintained an open forum for discussion: these days Iron Man, T-Nation, and now this website are wonderful forums for the free exchange of ideas, information, experimental reports.

I've often heard Jones compared to Albert Einstein. I think that's a real disservice to both. Einstein surely gave birth to breakthroughs resulting in a major paradigm shift in a few short years; however, Einstein offered only theories, while acceptance of his ideas was born of experiments confirming them. I think of Jones as being more akin to Darwin: Darwin brought about a conclusion to more than a century of speculation about evolution, much of what preceded him being entirely speculative theorizing. His painstaking collection of data, including his own on his journey aboard the Beagle, resulted in a data driven set of conclusions.

Jones brought conclusions to at least three decades of speculation, theorizing, and experimentation - at a time when there was nothing close to muscle science (Ell Darden, Terry Todd, and John Ivy were all in graduate school then, preparing to become pioneering scientists giving birth to muscle science). The notion of intensity of effort does not originate with Jones: Vince Gironda wrote about it as "training density" while power rack limited range isotonic/isometric/isometronic training systems of the early sixties were fully intensity training systems. Jones, as Darden well notes, came on board as a generalist - along with copious notes and observations from his own experimentation, the gym being his Beagle.

Comingling of HIT and Rand's "objectivist" polemics remains an astonishing notion. Her The Fountainhead was loosely patterned after the life of architect Frank Llyod Wright, an individual if there ever was one: however, Wright's personal life was guided by Gurdjieff, a Russian living in Fountainbleau, near Versailles, outside of Paris, teaching methods of mind and emotional control garnished from Islamic Shi'a Sufi sources in Persia and other streams of Euro-Asian bodymind training.

The Feb 2007 issue of Iron Man includes a Wisdom of Mike Mentzer (sic!) article in which he is quoted dispelling any role of mind in training. Having earned a reputation of being emotionally troubled and subject to a variety of addictive disorders, no doubt the role of mind/emotion in training was exceptionally foreign to him as one would expect of someone with what seems to have been a borderline personality or dissociative identification disorder prone to addictions.

As such, his pronouncements should be taken in context of his troubling issues rather than being sweeping generalizations about the state of the art of mind/emotions in training. In that context, Rand's "objectivism" might well have been a sort of psychological armouring protective strategy aimed at ennobling what was left of his failed career as a projected consequence of villianous others who did him in - qua paranoic conspiracy theories.

Jones had no part in such loaded thinking. He was not and is not a West Coast "loadie" - nor a displaced homeless person with time in mental institutions in the name of some marginal pseudo-philosophy.

Jones is the real deal, an Irongame Participan con Heuvos. His mind is marked by a sober rationality as well as his own sense of how to have good fun and play. Arthur has no doubts about how to enjoy himself, and no tolerance for opiates, cocaine, steroids, mental whimpiness, and the like.
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