MB Madaera
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Chris Madaera
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Thanks to the great members on this forum I was able to find and am about to purchase a nautilus plate loaded Compound Bicep/Tricep machine. I spent a month trying to find one and 24 hours after I posted on this forum I was in contact with a seller.

I am looking for 2 more machines.
1. First Generation 4-way neck
2. First Generation multi-exercise
One with a bar that allows palms up chins instead of the ones that had only the side grip you would use for behind the neck chins.

Im located in Ontario so the closer the better. These are the last 2 pieces I need for my home gym. Any help would be great.

Thanks Michael
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noone

New York, USA

I want a multi-exercise as well. My favorite machine ever made.

Bret
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BRUCELEEWANNABE

Florida, USA

Been looking for a Mulit-exercise machine for 1 yr. now. Hook me up!
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jn6047

Hi Mike, good to here you tracked one down. Is it the older one with steel cams or the newer aluminum?

By the way, I'm the fellow you contacted with the gym in Alberta. I also might know of an OME but I won't know for sure for a couple of weeks. I'll keep you posted.

jn6047
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noone

New York, USA

This past weekend, I turned down 3 machines:

Nautilus first generation:
1. Multi-Bi's
2. Multi-Tri's

and a nautilus second generation leg ext.

I just couldn't get the cash together. Plus it would have been alot of work moving them. It broke my heart, but it was the right thing for me to do at this time.

Bret
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kurtvf

Help me out. I was going to purchase a "hip sled" that allows both incline leg presses and hack squats. After reading this forum for the past month or so maybe the Duo-squat machine would be a better option. If you could only have one: Duo-squat vs. hip sled which would you pick and why. Thanks.
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Hello kurtvf

I would have to say the duo-squat. I just purchased one for my home gym. I have had a couple problems because of my height(im 6"4) but with that being said most leg machines tend to work against me in one form or another.

The pros for the duo-squat are the fact that it is independant movement arms so you can work each leg at a time, or one leg against each other with the Akinetic bar in place. Mine came without it so I had to fashion one out of some cold rolled steel. Nautilus told me it 16" with a 3/4" diameter if you encounter the same problem.

Also the moevemnt feels much better on my knees. If you read the Nautilus Advanced bodybuilding book it will explain this more, but basically the movemnt keeps you legs inline better than traditional leg presses or squats.

The 3rd reason why the duo-squat is better is the negative cam. On a leg press Most people can push much more weight at the top of the movement and not nearly as much at the bottom. On the duo-squat that problem is taken care of. If you were to select 510 pounds on the machine, by the top of the movement the weight would actually be just over 1100lbs.

My last reason is because the damn thing is built to last. It is hell to move and you will have to take every piece of it off to do so, but thats a small price to pay for the quality of this machine.

If you decide to purchase one I know where there is one in Ohio and one in virgina. I was looking at both of them before I ultimatly got mine from California.
Hope this helps and if you have any more questions Id be more than happy to help.

Michael
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Landau

Florida, USA

BigMike: I have a first generation 4 way neck, but would sell my early 2nd generation one that I had re-done and is near mint. You can PM me. David
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kurtvf

BigMike, what do you think of Gen I vs. Gen II vs. Next Generation etc. I'll admit I'm a fan of Gen I really only for nostalga as they were the vogue when I was training the hardest (late high school, early college years, before a career meant anything to me) I certainly couldn't afford one for my home gym way back then. Which do you think are better and why?
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Hello kurtvf

I have found the first gen nautilus to be the best for several reasons.
The first generation machines always have the bigger cams. I have no proof to say that they are better but I always found the contractions to be more intense the bigger the cam. (this excludes negative cams which offcourse work because they are small)

Also when I look at later machines I don't see anything to make them better at building muscle. I see them as being made to be able to ship easier, move easier and as a way to sell more machines. Just makes cents when you are running a company but doesn't build more muscle.

Another think I like about first gen is that you can find many double machines. I know they carried over the double chest machine into the second generation, but the first gen double chest, shoulder and pullover/torso arm are superior machine. I've never moved or worked out on a double leg but Im sure it is great to.

I also like that first gen machine are bullet proof. Not to take anything away from other nautilus machines but first gen were made to last, FOREVER.
Most things today are built so bad its not funny. Its nice to see how things should be built.

Finally and maybe the most practical point of all is first gen are the cheapest. I don;t know if you consider a duo-squat fist gen but i picked one up for $100. I picked up my Pullover/torso arm refurbished for $500. They are the biggest bargain out there in terms of fitness equipment.

Hope this helps, if you have any other questions, just ask.

Michael
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henry_bordeaux

Hi Mike,

doesn't the duo-squat belong to the 2nd gen?

I always thought it was something like this:


1st gen (70ies, first plateloaded, then selec.)
2nd (early 80ies - the series with the duo squat, lower back)
then leverage (mid 80ies)
then Next Gen (early 90ies)



correct me if i'm wrong...


Henry
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Ellington Darden

henry_bordeaux wrote:
Hi Mike,

doesn't the duo-squat belong to the 2nd gen?

I always thought it was something like this:


1st gen (70ies, first plateloaded, then selec.)
2nd (early 80ies - the series with the duo squat, lower back)
then leverage (mid 80ies)
then Next Gen (early 90ies)


correct me if i'm wrong...


Henry


Henry is on-target with his classifications. The duo-squat machine was not introduced until 1983.

Ellington

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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Hello Henry you are right about the duo-squat. And Im not about to refute Dr.Darden.
If I had a chance to buy a first gen double chest or second gen double chest, I would pick the first for sure.

Assuming you have the space because first gen is much bigger. Thats the point I was trying to make.

There is no earlier model of the duo-squat, with the exception of the version used for the Colorado Experiment and the study done at west point. To my knowledge they were never produced for cosumer sale. However the duo-squat that was made for consumer purchase was a superior leg machine in my opinion.

Dr. Darden I have a few questions maybe only you can answer. Why did they move to a smaller cam in later machines did it still vary the reistance to the same degree? I could never figure out the logic.

Also why did they go from Steel spider cams to solid aluminum cams. I'ved had people tell me the steel cams were larger, but I have an aluminum cam version pullover and plate loaded arm machine and without measuring I can't see any difference in size between there spidercam counterpart.

Was one cam version better than the other? Did the switch come to save cost? reduce drag? No one has been able to tell me and I have yet to figure this out. If you could answer these questions it would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks

Michael
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Hello jn6047

Good to see you are on this forum as well. It it wasn't for this website I would have never found all the machines I was looking for. my OME is an aluminum cam verion. Im going to be posting pictures of my home gym soon with a thank you to everyone that helped. I hope your gym is doing well.

I left you a phone messege back a few months ago about a possible compound arm machine that was on ebay. If you didn't see it, its hard to explain but it wasn't the right machine. in fact it didn't appear to be a machine that was noramlly produced by nautilus. Either a copy with a nuatilus cam or some oddball machine they made. Anyways i will contact you if I do find one. Thanks again for your help.

Michael
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Ellington Darden

bigmikep wrote:
Hello Henry you are right about the duo-squat. And Im not about to refute Dr.Darden.
If I had a chance to buy a first gen double chest or second gen double chest, I would pick the first for sure.

Assuming you have the space because first gen is much bigger. Thats the point I was trying to make.

There is no earlier model of the duo-squat, with the exception of the version used for the Colorado Experiment and the study done at west point. To my knowledge they were never produced for cosumer sale. However the duo-squat that was made for consumer purchase was a superior leg machine in my opinion.

Dr. Darden I have a few questions maybe only you can answer. Why did they move to a smaller cam in later machines did it still vary the reistance to the same degree? I could never figure out the logic.

Also why did they go from Steel spider cams to solid aluminum cams. I'ved had people tell me the steel cams were larger, but I have an aluminum cam version pullover and plate loaded arm machine and without measuring I can't see any difference in size between there spidercam counterpart.

Was one cam version better than the other? Did the switch come to save cost? reduce drag? No one has been able to tell me and I have yet to figure this out. If you could answer these questions it would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks

Michael


During the early 1970s, Jones liked the spider cams because they got across the idea of the chambered NAUTILUS. The problem with the spider cams was that they were labor intense. They had to be mostly handmade. Gradually, he went to aluminum cams because they could be machine made and over the long haul it was less expensive.

Also, anytime he could make the cams smaller, he did so because generally it saved money.

Ellington

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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Thank you very much Dr. Darden. That explanation make sense. I guess the last question I would have on the subject would be. Do you feel the smaller cam verions are just as effective as the bigger cam verions?
Thanks again for the quick response to my previous question.

Michael
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Ellington Darden

bigmikep wrote:
Thank you very much Dr. Darden. That explanation make sense. I guess the last question I would have on the subject would be. Do you feel the smaller cam verions are just as effective as the bigger cam verions?
Thanks again for the quick response to my previous question.

Michael


It should not make any difference, if the mechanics are the same. The smaller cam versions should be just as effective as the larger cam versions. There may, however, be other differences that are confusing the issue.

Ellington



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kurtvf

FWIW I saw an "OME" or multi-exercise on eBay last night. Someone in Ohio. It has the "spider cam" (love this lingo) so I guess it's an older one. By the way what does OME stand for??? There is also a nice Next generation(I think)circut for a measley $4K.
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Ellington Darden

OME: Omni Multi-Exercise, Omni meaning you can do normal (positive-negative), negative-only, and hyper style of exercise on it.

Ellington
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Landau

Florida, USA

My Plate Loading Bicep/Tricep has the original spider cams. David
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kurtvf

Thanks for all the replies. One more question I've always wondered about: Why do nautilus machines have so many "counterbalances"? Exactly what is being balanced and why is it beneficial??
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jn6047

Hi. Saw the pictures of your gym, looks great. I'll have to post pics of mine when I have the chance.

I did get your messege, and that was exactly the machine I am looking for. Unfortunetly the bidding went a little bit crazy, and I missed out on it, the compound tricep, and a duo shoulder. But thanks for the heads up.

Also, the place I told you about in Edmonton is having an Auction next month, they have a few Nautilus pieces that will be going. You can keep in touch with me via email at irongym@telus.net Take care.

jn6047

bigmikep wrote:
Hello jn6047

Good to see you are on this forum as well. It it wasn't for this website I would have never found all the machines I was looking for. my OME is an aluminum cam verion. Im going to be posting pictures of my home gym soon with a thank you to everyone that helped. I hope your gym is doing well.

I left you a phone messege back a few months ago about a possible compound arm machine that was on ebay. If you didn't see it, its hard to explain but it wasn't the right machine. in fact it didn't appear to be a machine that was noramlly produced by nautilus. Either a copy with a nuatilus cam or some oddball machine they made. Anyways i will contact you if I do find one. Thanks again for your help.

Michael


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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

I will have to check out that auction. Thanks for the reply. Sorry to hear about the bidding. That arm machine that was for sale and the seated tricep machine look nothing like any other Nautilus machines Ive ever seen. Maybe prototypes, maybe rip-offs from back in the day?
Anyways Hope your gym is doing well.

Michael
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jn6047

Gym is doing great, memberships are steadily increasing. This month is our 1 year anniversary.

Those two machines, they were 1st gen Nautilus Compound machines (meaning compound position). Fairly rare, especially the shape that they were in.
Whoever won ended up with a very very nice piece.

jn6047
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