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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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HIT and Running
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Stefan-Josef

How can i put my running routine around the HIT routine? I want to do the running twice a week. I want to do a effective HIT routine and a effective running routine...is this possible to do together?
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HamsFitness

shouldnt be an issue at all really, consider how hard you run and for how long. If it is a long time - why is it?
Do you do it for competition/work and is it needed or just done for kicks.

Just keep an eye on feeling over tired and grouchy, then back off a little until you feel better.

Humans can take huge stress before they buckle so training more than 2 or 3 times per week is fine so long as intensity is kept in check and you listen to your body.

Rest when needed.
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autoartist

I am going through the same thing.
I must run for my job. I get timed for 1.5 mile runs.

This is what I do.

Right now I run once per week. Soon I will run twice per week 1.5 ml.

Mon HIT (10 exercises entire body)
Wed HIT (10 exercises but no legs)

**Here I take 15 minute break after HIT and then run. I tried to run on Weds. and still do legs but my body couldn't handle that, at least not yet. So I skip legs on HIT and run instead (Weds).**

Fri HIT (10 exercises entire body)

Soon I will try to run on Sundays too and then come in w/ HIT on Monday.

In my HIT routines I don't do leg curls or extensions. I only do leg press/squats and calves.

I hope that helps, give it a try.


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HamsFitness

sounds like good advice from auto
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Stefan-Josef

Thank you for your good advices. I also had to run for my Job and get timed for 3 Km runs. I had to make a fitnesstest, also. So i want to get stronger and faster, but i do not want to loose weight. I will try your programm autoartist!I hope
my recover ability is good enough.
SJ
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Stefan-Josef

Thank you for your good advices. I also had to run for my Job and get timed for 3 Km runs. I had to make a fitnesstest, also. So i want to get stronger and faster, but i do not want to loose weight. I will try your programm autoartist!I hope
my recover ability is good enough.
JS
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Tom71

Two days of running and two days of HIT is quite alot of work. I'm not going to comment on aspects of overtraining and whether or not running is healthy or dangerous or anywhere in between.

But if you must do so, I'd like to recommend reading "Lean For Life" by Clarence Bass. There's lots of ideas here for blending mutiple training days per week of both cardio and weight training. Clarence uses a blended HIT and periodization approach.

Specifically, you might consider taking any given A/B whole body routine as recommended in TNHIT or elsewhere and applying a hard-day, easy-day approach. The approach is straight forward and an example would be:
Week 1
Mon - HIT routine A easy
Tues - running hard
Wed - off
Thurs - Hit routine A hard
Fri - running easy
Sat - off
Sun - off
Week 2
same as 1 but with HIT routine B

Tom

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manzo

Stefan ,
This was my reply in case you didnt see it when you asked this question in the stage reps post.

If you want to run and strength train my advice is to experiment a bit and see what suits you best.

For a few weeks try running on the same day as your HIT workouts (run after your HIT) and rest on days between.

Then for a few weeks try running on seperate days to your workout and see what you prefer and respond better to.

With the first option you get a full days rest (at least) between your workouts, so you might find you recover better this way compared to the 2nd option.

However you may feel you lack the energy to run on the same day as your workout so its probably best to experiment.
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Unless you are elderly, disabled or live an extremely stressful life, 2 running and 2 HIT sessions per week should be just fine. If you don't have something very significant working against you then not being able to handle this just means you need to adjust to the extra work and get in better overall condition.

No need to over complicate it. If you feel a bit run down or dragged out one week drop a session of either.

Regards,
Andrew
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davise

Same boat...have to run for job. I run immediately after a HIT session...even though I would rather lie down usually. Even though my runs suffer after a HIT session, when it comes time to actually run for time and I'm not doing HIT first I run a hell of a lot faster. Whether its healthy, unnecessary for health I don't know. I work out on free weights and have to change a lot of things between exercises so there is minimal cardio gain. For me, I have to run. In a perfect training environment with machines, no crowds, and selectorized resistance I could probably get by with running only once a week, but I don't live or train in that world.
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NewYorker

New York, USA

I have always had the best success running and HIT on the same days, but not at the same time.

For example:
Monday
noon: run
5 pm: HIT

Thursday
noon: run
5 pm: HIT

Saturday
noon: run

The theory is that you do not want to interfere with your body's recovery/growth from a HIT session. So do not do anything strenuos the rest of the day or the next day.

It's simple. It works. But nobody does it.
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sprinter1

2 cents worth...If you need to run distance for work qualifacation then I guess you have to...otherwise for those wanting to run I'd suggest considering shorter anaerobic sprint type intervals as opposed to longer steady-state aerobic running.

It's more in line with the type of training most of us here prefer (HIT) to do. Also...the type of body that sprinting helps to develop is more inline with what the majority of us here are wanting to aquire....as opposed to that of distance running. If you've ever watched a track meet you know what I'm talking about...and the sprinters are every bit as lean as the distance runners...but with alot more muscle.

Do keep in mind however that "sprinting" is a relative term. To someone who hase not sprinted since their school days and is overweight "sprinting" may mean a quick walk up a hill is all it takes to make you get anaerobic. Going out and trying to blast down the lane would be a mistake. Like all exercise better to error on the side of caution when starting something new and take it easier (as opposed to harder) when starting out. There's plenty of time to crank up the intensity later.
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manzo

sprinter1 wrote:
..the type of body that sprinting helps to develop is more inline with what the majority of us here are wanting to aquire....as opposed to that of distance running. If you've ever watched a track meet you know what I'm talking about...and the sprinters are every bit as lean as the distance runners...but with alot more muscle.


Sprinter1,
Im not disagreeing with you, but i also think that athletes that are successfaul in sprinting or distance running are so because they have the body suited (genetics) to sprinting or distance running.
ie: the sprinters tend to have a higher % of Fast Twitch muscle fibers,
and the distance runners a higher % of Slow Twitch fibers.
Percentages which cannot be altered.

Although it has been said that the Intermediate fibers can act more as a slow or fast twitch fiber, depending on the training, and probably other things.


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sprinter1

alan1 wrote:
sprinter1 wrote:
..the type of body that sprinting helps to develop is more inline with what the majority of us here are wanting to aquire....as opposed to that of distance running. If you've ever watched a track meet you know what I'm talking about...and the sprinters are every bit as lean as the distance runners...but with alot more muscle.
quote]

Sprinter1,
Im not disagreeing with you, but i also think that athletes that are successfaul in sprinting or distance running are so because they have the body suited (genetics) to sprinting or distance running.
ie: the sprinters tend to have a higher % of Fast Twitch muscle fibers,
and the distance runners a higher % of Slow Twitch fibers.
Percentages which cannot be altered.

Although it has been said that the Intermediate fibers can act more as a slow or fast twitch fiber, depending on the training, and probably other things.




Alan I agree about the genetics...to a large degree we have to play the hand nature delt us...so to speak.

I'm just saying that for someone who is trying to develop a high level of muscularity and needs/wants to run that sprinting intervals are the better choice over running longer distances...in my opinion.

Its likely NO RUNNING AT ALL is the best for developing maxium muscular size/strength. However...for me personally...I've never been able to achieve a good degree of leaness without some type of additional "cardio" supplementing my weight training. I like harder, briefer sprint intervals over the more traditional longer steady state types of cardio.






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manzo

sprinter1 wrote:
Its likely NO RUNNING AT ALL is the best for developing maxium muscular size/strength.


This may be true.
(That is no extra aerobic work, not just running).

If we are talking about someone who WANTS to run, but doesnt have to for a test or their job then there are different ways to look at it-

High intensity intervals can burn more total fat and calories, and take less time than longer lower intensity activity..., but some people MAY find HIIT harder to recover from due to its high intensity, and therefor it may interfere more with recovery than with the lower intensity activitys. With this in mind lower intensity activities MAY be able to be performed more often, which may be an advantage depending on their goals.

Of course, if too much of either is performed they will end up overtraining.

Again im not saying you are wrong (i prefer HIIT too), i guess some people will prefer HIIT and get better results with it (whatever the results that they are looking for may be), and some will prefer and get better results with longer lower intensity activities. Maybe both can have a place.

Other things that will influence their choice would be time available, goals, personal preference (may get bored with longer stuff), history,recovery, motivation, discomfort tolerance etc.
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Mid-Sized Tex

California, USA

NewYorker wrote:
I have always had the best success running and HIT on the same days, but not at the same time.

For example:
Monday
noon: run
5 pm: HIT

Thursday
noon: run
5 pm: HIT

Saturday
noon: run

The theory is that you do not want to interfere with your body's recovery/growth from a HIT session. So do not do anything strenuos the rest of the day or the next day.

It's simple. It works. But nobody does it.


Much of the advice on this board has been good, in my opinion, but this is the best, most succint way of putting it. The entire idea behind HIT is very intense, very brief wkouts, then plenty of recovery time, rest, sleep, water and proper nutrients to assist in the recovery -- The closer together your HIT and running sessions are, the better you'll be assisting the recovery, and the more strength/size improvements you'll make.

Squeeze them as close together as you can, then rest, rest and more rest.

As your cardio/respiratory/vascular condition improves, you'll be able to move them closer and closer together, which will help you maximize your recovery time.

Good Hunting.

Bill
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