MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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sueflaster

Dr. Darden,

Thanks! I'll have a look. I must admit that yesterday's workout has left me a bit sore, but---after 3 weeks----there is a visible difference in my arms and shoulders. Yes, it's HARD, but absolutely worth it.

Sue
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Kinny

Dr. Darden,

Which of your books would you reccomend to someone who has been an "isolation" lifter for as long as he has lifted, The New HIT Revolution or your new work, The New Bodybuilding?

I saw a post where you mentioned the books complimented each other, but I would prefer to only purchase one.

Best Regards,
Kinny
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Ellington Darden

Kinny,

Go with The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Bodybuilding. It has more than twice the information and twice the pictures.

Ellington
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Kinny

Thanks for the quick reply. Order is being placed.
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twogunz

Dr. Darden,

One of your interviews with Dan Riley revealed an answer pertaining to the leg press and the squat thrust. Mr. Riley stated he was against the squat thrust if the leg press was present because the squat thrust puts an undue amount of stress on the lower back and spinal cord.

I would prefer to do the leg press as well instead of the squat thrust in all of my workouts, but i want to adhere to your beginner program completely as it has shown me results only something pharmaceuticals can do. What are your thoughts about the leg press and squat thrust?
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twogunz

sorry dr darden,

i think i might have said squat thrust instead of squats...i meant to inquire about the squat and the leg press
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Ellington Darden

If you have access to a good leg press machine, then you can substitute it for the squat with a barbell.

Ellington
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rnl

just finished your book. have been an avid lifter for over 10 yrs but have definitely plateaued. after reading the book i'd say it's because i've been overtraining. it's going to be very hard to give up the frequent and long workouts but you've convinced me to give HIT a try. truly is an amazing book - thank you, i hope...

ps why aren't you a fan of pull ups?
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chaire

North Carolina, USA

Dr.
This is one of your best books. My daughters bought it for me for Christmas. I spent Christmas Day reading it. The pics and stories are great.
Sales of the Negative equipment are picking up. We will be opening a center in New York in April.
I will be traing with Wes Brown this weekend. We will train old-school.
God Bless,
Charlie
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durhamlad

Tom Traynor wrote:
Anyone else having trouble placing a order? Screens just revolve in a loop when pushing "continue" at bottom of final info page.


I had no problem making the order..but I have waited 7 weeks for it to come...even though I paid nearly $80 for the book and delivery by FedEx...which they said would be 5-7 days..i'm in the UK..i know its a long swim from the US but i was under the impression that FedEx used airplanes these days!!!
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Kinny

Dr. Darden,

I have made my first pass through your new book and will be re-reading it shortly. I have a feeling that I may also be purchasing "The New HIT Revolution" as well to help give more insight into the practices for HIT.

Some background: Over the last 14 months, I have been following a 5 day split, consisting of: Chest/Cardio - Back - Legs - Shoulders/Cardio - Arms/Cardio.

I don't believe I fell into the "High Volume" training (I could be mistaken), as I would structure my daily workouts so that each exercise would basically have one warm-up set, two work sets, and then a failure set. Total sets for most days would never exceed 12 work/failure sets.

Resistance for following workouts would be increased after hitting target reps on failure set. (All of this is to give you some idea of my current mindset, which I am attempting to change). While I have experienced strength increases, things have been pretty stagnant at times.

I am looking to start the HIT Foundational routines this week, but had a few questions:

1) Is the recommended cadence for all of the exercises 4/4, or does it vary based on movement/body part?

2) Other than stretching before starting the routine, is there anything else you recommend for the pre-lifting warm-up (i.e. do you recommend a few reps before each exercise at less than work weight)?

3) I have seen various rest times (between sets) listed on the board and in the book. What is your recommendation for starting out with the HIT routine? 1 minute for upper body between sets and 2 for legs?

4) The Gym I lift at has a chin-up assist machine. I know that I currently cannot perform any more than 3 unassisted chin-ups with proper form, especially at a 4-4 cadence. Would you recommend NO chin-ups (if so, how long for the descend), OR using the assist/cheater bar, or a combo of both? I am assuming that for both chin-ups and dips the target rep range is still 8-12, and that weight should be added to maintain that range.

I realize that these things can be pretty subjective and relative to each individual, but I wanted to get your opinion to get a "baseline" starting point.

Thanks for a great book.

Regards,
Kinny

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twogunz

Dr. Darden,

I have been very strict on HIT for three months now and absolutely love it.


Question: What if you go away on vacation, and it's not your 9 day layoff in between segments, and there isn't a gym around.

Do you maybe have a routine for this, such as neg. chins and dips? How about super slow push ups? And what about legs??? Any ideas??? Thank you

ray
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Ellington Darden

Kinny,

1) Is the recommended cadence for all of the exercises 4/4, or does it vary based on movement/body part?

It would vary between 2/2 and 6/6, depending on the range of movement, with the average being about 3/3 or 4/4.

2) Other than stretching before starting the routine, is there anything else you recommend for the pre-lifting warm-up (i.e. do you recommend a few reps before each exercise at less than work weight)?

You don't really need much of a warm-up. Reread chapter 17.

3) I have seen various rest times (between sets) listed on the board and in the book. What is your recommendation for starting out with the HIT routine? 1 minute for upper body between sets and 2 for legs?

Those are good starting points for rest times: 1 and 2 minutes.

4) The Gym I lift at has a chin-up assist machine. I know that I currently cannot perform any more than 3 unassisted chin-ups with proper form, especially at a 4-4 cadence. Would you recommend NO chin-ups (if so, how long for the descend), OR using the assist/cheater bar, or a combo of both? I am assuming that for both chin-ups and dips the target rep range is still 8-12, and that weight should be added to maintain that range.

Try negative-only chins at a slow, 8-second lowering time for the first 4 or 5 reps. Then, they get faster. Stop when you can't control the lowering.

Ellington

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Ellington Darden

twogunz wrote:
Dr. Darden,

I have been very strict on HIT for three months now and absolutely love it.


Question: What if you go away on vacation, and it's not your 9 day layoff in between segments, and there isn't a gym around.

Do you maybe have a routine for this, such as neg. chins and dips? How about super slow push ups? And what about legs??? Any ideas??? Thank you

ray


ray,

Do the NO chins and dips . . . and how about a 60-second wall squat? If you can do 60 seconds, go for 90 seconds or even 120 seconds.

Ellington

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jmathias

I have been working out for about 2 years and have hit a plateau. My main problem is that I am in a wheelchair and can only train my upper body. I am currently reading your book titled "The New High Intensity Training" and I really want to try HIT.

I am not confined to my chair, I get out of it frequently in the gym to preform different exercises. My upper body is very strong but I want more and better results. Is HIT for me?
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Ellington Darden

jmathias wrote:
I have been working out for about 2 years and have hit a plateau. My main problem is that I am in a wheelchair and can only train my upper body. I am currently reading your book titled "The New High Intensity Training" and I really want to try HIT.

I am not confined to my chair, I get out of it frequently in the gym to preform different exercises. My upper body is very strong but I want more and better results. Is HIT for me?


Yes, I believe HIT will work well for you. Under your situation, I recommend that you do 9-10 upper exercises two or three times per week.

Ellington

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RyanWallace

Massachusetts, USA

Dr Darden,
I liked some of the interviews with the coaches in your recent book. One of the questions I battle with is HIT and sport specific skill training. Still trying to figure alot of it out. Finding the right amount of balance between sport skill training and strength training is the hardest thing to do. Any suggestions?
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Kinny

Dr. Darden,

Three work-outs in to the HIT training, I have been pleasantly surprised with the intensity level of the workouts and the soreness the day or so after. I do have one question that has been discussed to some extent, but I have a slightly different question.

During dead lifts on my last workout, I failed due to my fore-arms giving out before my back/hamstrings did. While this is not a failure of the "intended" body part, should I still consider this my "failure" point before resorting to using lifting straps to compensate?

While I do not wish to sacrifice my leg development due to currently weak/tired forearms, I do not want to take action that will perpetuate the problem.

Any suggestions? I am currently performing the standard A-B whole body HIT routine in the book, and intend to do so for the first six weeks.

Best Regards,
Kinny
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Ellington Darden

RyanWallace wrote:
Dr Darden,
I liked some of the interviews with the coaches in your recent book. One of the questions I battle with is HIT and sport specific skill training. Still trying to figure alot of it out. Finding the right amount of balance between sport skill training and strength training is the hardest thing to do. Any suggestions?


Reread chapter 10. It provides many guidelines.

Ellington


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Ellington Darden

Kinny wrote:
Dr. Darden,

Three work-outs in to the HIT training, I have been pleasantly surprised with the intensity level of the workouts and the soreness the day or so after. I do have one question that has been discussed to some extent, but I have a slightly different question.

During dead lifts on my last workout, I failed due to my fore-arms giving out before my back/hamstrings did. While this is not a failure of the "intended" body part, should I still consider this my "failure" point before resorting to using lifting straps to compensate?

While I do not wish to sacrifice my leg development due to currently weak/tired forearms, I do not want to take action that will perpetuate the problem.

Any suggestions? I am currently performing the standard A-B whole body HIT routine in the book, and intend to do so for the first six weeks.

Best Regards,
Kinny


Keep doing the program, even though your forearms may be a limiting factor. Your forearm and gripping muscles should improve. After 4-6 weeks, try the routine in chapter 30 for several weeks. That should help.

Ellington

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richblide

El,

Patti and I have been going over your website, reading about your and Arthur's old days and about your new book. It all looks very exciting.

Do you remember us from the old days, first from our days in Florida at the new Sport's Medicine Center and then from Dallas when you were there?

We are traveling to Florida in April and wonder if we could visit with you briefly and reminisce about the old days and possibly meet with Arthur too.

I'm not sure this email will get to you but we are trying.

We are both doing well and still working out though we have given up running.

Dick & Patti Blide
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twogunz

Dr. Darden,

I watched someone train the other day using one of those power glide mats, however they used the glide cover (normally used on the shoes) on their hands instead of their feet. They started in the push up position, and slowly brought their hands out to the side, somewhat simulating a chest/fly workout. It was slow in repetition, but definitely abnormal to my eyes.

How do you feel about this type of exercise in accordance with H.I.T.? Can this movement be used to target the chest better, or is possibly going to injure the shoulder / rotator cuff area?
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Ellington Darden

twogunz wrote:
Dr. Darden,

I watched someone train the other day using one of those power glide mats, however they used the glide cover (normally used on the shoes) on their hands instead of their feet. They started in the push up position, and slowly brought their hands out to the side, somewhat simulating a chest/fly workout. It was slow in repetition, but definitely abnormal to my eyes.

How do you feel about this type of exercise in accordance with H.I.T.? Can this movement be used to target the chest better, or is possibly going to injure the shoulder / rotator cuff area?


It sounds risky to me. I would stay clear of stuff like this.

Ellington

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twogunz

to be totally honest, it kinda looked risky as well...i thought the same, just wanted to hear your thoughts...thanks for the quick feedback

ray
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rnl

Dr. Darden

bought you book. loved it. appeared i was guilty of overtraining (have been lifting seriously for over 10 years). but now very concerned as i'm losing weight and muscle since starting your best of the best routine. only been at it for a couple weeks but is this normal?? actually love the routine and want to continue but...

please help. thank you.
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