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Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
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Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
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Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
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Jeff Turner
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Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
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Ted Tucker
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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Ellington Darden

Go Old School, The New Way:
Lund and Darden Talk Bodybuilding

Notice the remarkable "glow" that Scott Wilson's body seems to have.
That's a trait of a Chris Lund photograph and some of his outstanding
shots are used in The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results.
In the 1980s, Lund developed his own film and hand-printed
each selected negative. Today, those techniques would
be considered old school — which, in my
mind, means superior.


Chris Lund has been a primary photographer for Joe Weider's muscle magazines for more than two decades. Plus, he's also the editor of the British version of Flex magazine.

In the 1980s, Lund worked with me on many of my bodybuilding books — such as The Nautilus Advanced Bodybuilding Book, High-Intensity Bodybuilding, and Massive Muscles in 10 Weeks. His creative photography was one of the reasons that each of the above became a bestseller.

Chris grew up in Sunderland, England, during the 1950s and 1960s and remembers being fascinated by size and strength. "I started weight training at our local YMCA in 1962," Chris noted, "with a bunch of hardcore guys, led by a Reg Park look-a-like named Steve. Steve weighed 300 pounds, which was unheard of then, and advocated drinking 6 to 8 pints of milk mixed with raw eggs — every day.

"On Saturday night, the training gang would all go to a working man's pub and, under Steve's instruction, each of us would down 8 pints of Guinness — in preparation for Monday's workout.

"Besides eating big, Steve also pushed big-muscle exercises, three-times-per-week training, and whole-body routines. As you can probably imagine, we all added significant mass to our frames.

"A couple of years later, I was employed at the police department, where I was an investigation officer. Part of the job involved photography and the department taught me how to take precise, well-lit pictures related to crime-scene evidence.

"Soon thereafter, I took my first bodybuilding photo and sent it to a muscle magazine. The shot was of Tony Emmott, who had placed high in the Mr. Britain contest. Tony went through his posing routine at the local pub one night and I was down front with a borrowed 35mm camera. When the photo was published, I received a check for $12.

"I thought to myself: This will probably be easier than crime-scene investigations. Little did I know what I was getting myself into!

"It wasn't long, however, before I was hooked on bodybuilding photography. After forty years, I still am."

Recently, Chris and I discussed my latest book.


UPDATE ON THE NEW BODYBUILDING FOR OLD-SCHOOL RESULTS

Chris Lund: Ell, your new book was a pleasure for me to read. It brought back a ton of memories. It's been out for about 6 months now — has it met your expectations in the sales department?

Ellington Darden:

Lund: I imagine your Web site has sold a lot more books than T-Nation — right?

Darden:

Lund: I've visited the T-Nation Web site a number of times. They certainly have a lot going on, with numerous training philosophies and almost-anything-goes forums. And T-Nation promotes other bodybuilding books, too.

Darden:

Lund: But your book, Ell, has so much going for it — the layout, photography, routines, and stories — that I can't imagine any of the other books T-Nation offers being anywhere near the same appeal as yours.


THE NEW BODYBUILDING:
WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

Lund: Concerning your book, what specifically do you mean by the new bodybuilding? Is it really NEW?

Darden:

Chris Lund's photo of Ed Kawak, 1982 NABBA Mr. Universe,
makes a terrific opener for the book.


JONES'S HEALTH

Lund: You know, Ell, I find myself thinking about Arthur Jones and his early writings almost every week. I hear he's in poor health. How's the old man doing?

Darden:

Harder,
Briefer,
More Infrequent . . .
Exercise

Arthur Jones
4/24/07

Lund: I can't picture Arthur weighing 120 pounds and creeping around his home. He was always such a go-getter, who seemed to have a dozen different projects transpiring at the same time. In 1984, I flew with him to Mexico and photographed one of his ongoing medical projects. I never saw him even sit down the entire four days. He was constantly on the move.

Darden:


JONES'S INFLUENCE

Lund: After listening to you . . . and studying The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results, the book itself is sort of your testament to Arthur and what he means to you — am I right?

Darden:

I took these shots of Arthur Jones in early 1983 during a
one-on-one training session with Boyer Coe. There
was a heightened intensity to being trained by
Jones that demanded extreme focus.


"OLD SCHOOL" DEFINED

Lund: I'm a big proponent of that calf routine in chapter 27, which was in IronMan in 1971. I know I put a good half-inch on my calves from doing it for two weeks.

In fact, your book has quenched a thirst I've had for 20 years. I knew HIT wasn't fully developed.

I'm actually disappointed that it's taken this long to get things back on track. There's a lot of ground to make up. Like Arthur would say to a young, aspiring bodybuilder, "If you can spend the next 20 years unlearning everything you were taught about exercise, by the time you're 40, you might have a chance to actually learnsomething of value." Boy oh boy, there's a lot of unlearning to do.

Ell, you've referred to "old school" a number of times. I think I know what you mean, but being from England — we're more likeancient school — why don't you explain it? Exactly what do you mean by old school, as it relates to bodybuilding?

Darden:


THE MASTERS

Lund: Ell, you're right about a lack of productive mentoring — and, consequently, there's very little confidence and loyalty among bodybuilders, and especially where coaches and gyms are concerned.

Who are these bodybuilding masters that you refer to?

Darden:

Lund: Yes, Casey was quite a character. I photographed him a number of times in 1980. He kept me laughing half the time with all his antics and memories of the early days at Nautilus.

In the 1960s, the photos of those Golden-Age Mr. Americas kept me inspired back in the YMCA gym in England. I can still close my eyes and see those sunny, outdoor magazine covers of Jim Haislop, Frank Zane, and Boyer Coe.

Even today, when I photograph the professional champions — such as Jay Cutler, Ronnie Coleman, Gunter Schlierkamp, and Markus Ruhl — I marvel at their huge body parts, but I also wonder how they'd look (and act) with less mass, 32-inch waists, and with something we used to call SYMMETRY?

Darden:


HARDCORE STYLE

Lund: Ell, can you share a few more insider sentiments about The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results?

Darden:

Lund: Those full-page horizontal photos are really great. Naturally, I like what you've done with some of those shots of mine, especially the inside front and back covers, plus some of the magic close-ups of Boyer Coe and Scott Wilson.

Chris Lund arranged this backlit photo of Boyer Coe as he performed
a torso-arm pulldown on an outdoor loading dock. The distant
background was actually an out-of-focus parking lot and
the side of a metal building. In the foreground
was a Nautilus double chest machine.


BODYBUILDING ROUTINES

Lund: I'm a fan of the varied routines in your bodybuilding books. You've already touched on several workouts, but how many different routines are in The New Bodybuilding?

Darden:

Lund: Sounds bloody stimulating. I plan to do what I can to promote the book in Great Britain.

This old-school gym of Kim Wood contains a collection of antique
barbells and dumbbells that would make Chris Lund and his English
training partners — including Eugene Sandow — envious.


INSPIRATION + CONFIDENCE = RESULTS

As the author of The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results, I want to speak directly to you, from the heart. If you're a fan of Arthur Jones, the Golden Age, and tough routines that really work — this book is everything you've hoped for, and more.

Ever think there were key elements missing from your training, the absence of which was holding you back?

Well, let me assure you there are. For the last 15 years, I've been challenged repeatedly to give the world of high-intensity training some straight talk, and to inform the masses how far off track they really are. Finally, with this book, I've done just that.

The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results contains some important missing keys to maximizing your progress — the kind of progress that the Arthur Jones legend was built upon . . . the kind of progress that's been all but lost, and the kind of progress that produces the results you've always dreamed of.

It's time to . . . Go Old School, The New Way.

Don't waste another moment on unproductive training. Get inspired. Be confident. Stay motivated.

 

Discuss this article | Text Version

McNultyEssex

The book is excellent, and extremely good quality. Certainly get your moneys worth.

I shall also recommend it to people here, in the UK.
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timurthelame

Excellent book, great routines!
Hard work and basic exercises are missing in gyms all across the country. But something that is missing from HIT in general, it is a few pointers on how to work around injuries and illnesses, information on new supplements that work like Beta 7 (beta alanine) Creatine, whey, Gakic, and Forslean/Carbolin 19, (all of these supplements have been proven to work)

I have also found it hard to do H.I.T and my Mixed martial arts training since both take so much out of my recovery!:(


I think when looking back at all the mistakes I have made throughout the years, I would say stick to a few basic exercises like bench presses, squats, deadlifts, chins, dips and get as strong as possible and all other exercises should be supplements to the basics. And just as importantly control your diet and body fat levels.
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HSDAD

One word to increase your sales of the book at both outlets. . .

PAPERBACK.

I loved your 2004 offering and refer to it often.
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saseme

Wow, few responses here. People are too concerned with the sniping below to see what this site is really about. Great interview Dr. Darden, and great pictures as always by Chris Lund.
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AI1963

Thanks, Doc.

The book is great. I ordered immediately once it became available; it has at least met my high expectations.

Although I am quite careful, sheer usage of the book may cause me to order another. Seems I may wear this copy out!

The Jonesian clipboard and glasses that mark bits of wisdom were a nice touch. I think Chris Lund was right; while you've always credited Jones, this book seemed more of an homage than previous works I've seen.

Your description certainly makes it seem as if Jones' time is at hand. We'll not see another like him anytime soon.


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k38wood

Ell: Great interview! Chris Lund is not only
one of the very few body-building guys
I like personally but one of the top
guys you'll ever meet. I still laugh
about when you guys came to Cincinnati
a few years back to take pictures for a book...and you were business-like as
always and we were totally wasting your time goofing around and talking about John Cleese and Peter Sellers
and "The Goon Show" and "The Two Ronnies" and "The Titfield Thunderbolt"
and our guy, Rumpole and The Carry-on
Gang...we were screwing around big time
and you were a really good sport about it. Chris and I were sweating like pigs
just from laughing...and then when he
was trying to explain to us what a
"wanker" was the kid who worked
for me that summer cleaning machines
peeks around the corner and Chris says,
"That's a wanker!" and then he laughed so hard we thought he'd stroke out!
Great times...
Ell, I'm surprised you've sold any books to the "T-Nation" boys...BS
pulls 'em and keeps 'em at that site
why would a rational and solid approach to training have any power
with them... and heck, I'm not really
impressed with what goes on on this site.
If the posts here are an indication of where HIT is today I can see why it isn't popular. BUT your book is wonderful...my advice to
you is to keep punching no matter what
...it's a book that deserves to be
successful.
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hdlifter

Three decades under the iron, my library of bodybuilding books is quite extensive. I can vouch whole-heartedly that Darden's latest tombe is one of my favourites I still reread with joy quite regularly as there is such a wealth of information, it requires many reads to allow it all to sink in.

I have all of Mike Mentzer's books, and most of Darden's. Without hesitation I deem his latest book, his best by far! Going back to the roots of what I know and delivered best is a crucial factor. All too often many go astray, away from the core of what makes HIT great.

The initial chapter covering the memories of Muscle Beach was so vivid I literally felt I was there and lived the times of the Golden Era! I loved that feeling, that alone made the book special to me. I could almost smell the air, the sea-breeze on my face, and the atmosphere that was MUSCLE BEACH!

I commend El for writing such a terrific book, and urge others, if you want straight forward, non-fluff, valid information, you can't do better than El's new book.
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Butters

Dr. Darden,
You always mention a lot of old school BBers and trainers. The one I've always been really intruiged by was Vince Gironda. Did you ever have the chance to meet him?
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Ellington Darden

Butters wrote:
Dr. Darden,
You always mention a lot of old school BBers and trainers. The one I've always been really intruiged by was Vince Gironda. Did you ever have the chance to meet him?


I never met Vince. Jones knew Gironda and had a few opinions about him.

Ellington

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AI1963

I never met Vince. Jones knew Gironda and had a few opinions about him.

Ellington

-----

Would you please elaborate? Also please share any accounts of meetings between the two, any other related anecdotes.

Thank you.
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carbohydr8

So I have some questions regarding TUL. Most of you are probably famililar with the famous Casy Viator leg workout under the guidance of Arthur Jones. In this workout, and many others including the 5 set back workout, Jones would have trainees go from machine to machine with NO REST in between.

In this case, since their is no rest, would the real TUL be the additive TUL of all exercises done in a row. If this is the case would these TUL's have been WAY beyond the range of 45 to 90 seconds and therefore not nearly optimal for hypertrophy.

In Jones and Darden's writing they often recommend doing pre-exhaustion. During their pre-exhaustion they often do a "full" set, i.e. 8-12 reps, for both exercises. This would seem to give you an overall TUL that is quit long and not optimal.

I always thought that in a pre-exhautstion you want to do your first exercise with a heavier weight than usual so you would hit failure earlier and then both sets combined would have an optimal TUL.

Similarly in the arm workout with the 1 minute positive and 1 minute negative chin straight into curls, is the total TUL to long?

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Butters

carbohydr8 wrote:
Similarly in the arm workout with the 1 minute positive and 1 minute negative chin straight into curls, is the total TUL to long?



There's some argument that TUL can play a significant role in hypertrophy. The Doggcrapp guys have it to a fine art with their rest pause sets and extreme stretching. They're still maintaining a low volume and getting a long TUT.
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McNultyEssex

carbohydr8,

I don't think that TUL has an influence in muscle growth, although it my appear that it does (ie. performing 6RM will provide better stimulus than 1RM).
\
I believe that the inroad is of primary importance, no matter how long a set takes (although it makes sense to make exercises as short as possible).
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rtestes

Mississippi, USA

The book was solid. Everyone needs it in their Library. Lets get the next one out on a shorter schedule then this one.

With youtube and other video sites, you should take the opportunity to spread the HIT word and offer a platform to promote your writings. An immediate audience of 100s of thousands viewers.

I love what Hit is not:

* Haphazard exercise
* Partial-range sets
* Complexity
* Loud music
* Trash talk
* Arrogance
* Rudeness
* More-is-better training
* Steroids

So true. I wouldn't want it any other way!

RTE
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Butters

rtestes wrote:
* Loud music


So true. I wouldn't want it any other way!

RTE


I'm personally a big fan of loud music when I'm working out. Metal, techno, punk, I listen to it all. It helps drown out the inane conversations of the gym and keeps people from trying to talk to me there.

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Belly

Great article, I'm a big fan of Chris Lund as well as Dr. Darden, Chris really pushed real training in the British Flex during my early training years during the late 80's. It's good to see Athur's methods being pushed, I got to my all time biggest this year, after 20 years of training, following the abbreviated routine from Bulletin No 1. Any plans for Chris Lund, or anyone else, to sell the book direct in the UK?
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Ellington Darden

Belly wrote:
Great article, I'm a big fan of Chris Lund as well as Dr. Darden, Chris really pushed real training in the British Flex during my early training years during the late 80's. It's good to see Athur's methods being pushed, I got to my all time biggest this year, after 20 years of training, following the abbreviated routine from Bulletin No 1. Any plans for Chris Lund, or anyone else, to sell the book direct in the UK?


Maybe. In addition, Wayne Gallasch will be selling the book in Australia on his web site.

Ellington

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cargo

Dr. Darden,
Those color photos look amazing!
Any chance you will be selling any special editions of the book with color photos?
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Ellington Darden

cargo wrote:
Dr. Darden,
Those color photos look amazing!
Any chance you will be selling any special editions of the book with color photos?


No, I doubt it. Color ups the printing price significantly.

Ellington

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DownUnderLifter

Belly wrote:
Great article, I'm a big fan of Chris Lund as well as Dr. Darden, Chris really pushed real training in the British Flex during my early training years during the late 80's. It's good to see Athur's methods being pushed, I got to my all time biggest this year, after 20 years of training, following the abbreviated routine from Bulletin No 1. Any plans for Chris Lund, or anyone else, to sell the book direct in the UK?

Hey belly

Good to hear you've done well with AJ's routine. Are you referring to the 8 exercise routine? And were you doing it 3 x week as AJ suggests?

Cheers
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Belly

I'm doing the abbreviated routine from bulletin No 1, I've never started with the stiff legged deadlifts and only sometimes finish with them, I'm usually pretty tired by the end.

One of the things that's really helped me progress is the big rests(4 mins) between sets, this goes against the generally acknowledged fast paced HIT and Arthur's later recommendations but it really seems to make a big difference with avoiding overtraining for me. I've done the routine every third day rather than 3x a week.
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AI1963

Doctor Darden:

You alluded to Jones' opinions about Vince Gironda.

Would you please elaborate, share any related stories?

Many thanks.
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Ellington Darden

AI1963 wrote:
Doctor Darden:

You alluded to Jones' opinions about Vince Gironda.

Would you please elaborate, share any related stories?

Many thanks.


Vince called Arthur in 1978 or so and said he had some photos of a mysterious big foot animal, which were taken in the mountains of California. Then, he wanted to know if Arthur was interested in following up on this lead. Jones said, "No." That was the end of the conversation.

I heard Arthur mention several times that he did not care of Vince's articles in IronMan.

That was all.

Kim Wood might have heard a few other things, so Kim if you read this, please respond.

Ellington



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k38wood

I sat in a room with Arthur once when
he called Vince. The reason for the call was to respond to Vince's
"inter-view" in Muscle Builder that
knocked Arthur and the Nautilus machines.

Vince back peddled big time...claimed Weider's "fat guy"
came by and talked to him about the
machines...but said "the fat guy" actually
wrote his "inter-view". (I was told by Arthur that the "fat guy"
was strength writer, Ernest Cottrel
who "ghosted" many things for Weider at that time)

After that, Vince and
Arthur had a long conversation
concerning the economy and Easton's Gym in Hollywood. Arthur did not know Vince but connected with
men who lived through the depression and WWII so they got along in this conversation...talked like they were old chums.

Prior to that conversation Vince wrote some interesting things about Arthur in
Iron Man...He seemed to know a big change was coming.

I know Vince saw Arthur
and "The Blue Monster" at Culver City
(The AAU Mr. America contest was held there in summer 1970 and Arthur first exhibited what became the Nautilus machines at that time...he caused a big stir...) because I saw him there.
I watched him watch Arthur talk to
big crowds of interested people...

Vince was all dressed up but few people
seemed to notice him(actually Vince
was hard not to notice...he'd just had
his hair permed "California style"(lots of curls) and dyed a sort
of purple-ish brown... resplendent
in a ballooned-sleeved gypsy shirt
he was the sharpest-dressed 60 year
old man there...).

When I watched
Vince watch Arthur I got the impression
that he was a man who realized that his time had come and was going fast.

In the run-up to the Mr. America in 1971 when Casey was the talk of the
whole strength and body-building world
I remember that Arthur got a big
envelope from Vince...in it was
no note just a physique photo of Vince which
was inscribed "Casey Viator's ass sucks buttermilk" and was signed by
Vince(Vince had a distinctive signature
...a big "V" with a line after it).
Arthur showed it to me and asked me, "what
kind of a man would send something like
that?"




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