MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
Arthur and Smoking?
Author
Rating
Options

ZEZ

Did Arthur ever quit or did he continue to smoke till the end? The reason I ask is, that it seems like such a hard habit to break. It doesn't matter if a person has Asthma, Bronchitis, or even Emfazema. They'll die with that last cigarette in their hand.

I've seen people with oxygen tanks still smoking. And even people with no arms in wheelchairs asking people to lite their cigarettes. I've heard before that it's even harder to give up then heroin. I've never tried drugs, unless it was perscribed by a doctor, so I don't know. I guess the best way would just not to start. Any thoughts?
Open User Options Menu

pyro13g

Ohio, USA

Quitting is absolute murder for most. I know a few that have quit and it never bothered them. I know a few recovered heroine addicts that still smoke and can't, for the life of them, kick the habit and the addiction.

Not only is it hugely addicting, it gets ingrained with other daily habits(with a coffee, an alcoholic beverage, after a meal, etc). The delivery method of nicotine is second to none and that's through the lungs. Within 10 seconds of a puff, the nicotine is in your brain.
Open User Options Menu

jn6047

Just a small correction, the method of drug absorption from fastest to slowest is as follows:

1. intravenous 30-60 sec
2. intraosseous 30-60 sec
3. endotracheal 2-3 min
4. inhalation 2-3 min
5. sublingual 3-5 min
6. intramuscular 10-20 min
7. subcutaneous 15-30 min
8. rectal 5-30 min
9. ingestion 30-90 min
10. topical variable


jn6047
Open User Options Menu

leon79

As a former semi-heavy smoker (3 packs a day), I was one of the lucky few that found it easy to quit (then again, I'm quite stubborn, and was probably motivated by being told how hard it would be), though I don't doubt how hard it is for others.

The best advice I can give is to time your quitting smoking to coincide with other major changes taking place in your life. In my case, I quit right before I got married, moved, changed jobs, etc., so the smoking seemed to get lost in the pack and I barely noticed the withdrawal.
Open User Options Menu

kurtvf

I learned once in a psychology class that smokers smoke not because they like it, but because they don't like it when they don't smoke (see the difference?) I'm a thoracic surgeon and make a pretty good living off people that smoke or smoked. Why anyone would ever start is completely beyond me.

Many WW2/Korea vets started smoking in the military cause they were supplied in c-rations and there is a lot of boredom during warfare. I rarely meet a WW2 vet that hasn't smoked in the past.
Open User Options Menu

the_iron_goose

leon79 wrote:
As a former semi-heavy smoker (3 packs a day), I was one of the lucky few that found it easy to quit (then again, I'm quite stubborn, and was probably motivated by being told how hard it would be), though I don't doubt how hard it is for others.

The best advice I can give is to time your quitting smoking to coincide with other major changes taking place in your life. In my case, I quit right before I got married, moved, changed jobs, etc., so the smoking seemed to get lost in the pack and I barely noticed the withdrawal.


How many hours did you quit for Leon?

Open User Options Menu

leon79

kurtvf wrote:
I learned once in a psychology class that smokers smoke not because they like it, but because they don't like it when they don't smoke (see the difference?) I'm a thoracic surgeon and make a pretty good living off people that smoke or smoked. Why anyone would ever start is completely beyond me.

Many WW2/Korea vets started smoking in the military cause they were supplied in c-rations and there is a lot of boredom during warfare. I rarely meet a WW2 vet that hasn't smoked in the past.


That's an interesting first statement, and probably quite accurate.

As for starting, well, I can offer no real excuse for myself, nor can I speculate why anyone else picks up such a habit. I figure many were like me though, in that it was just the kind of thing you grew up around: first cigarette at ten years of age, first drink at 11, finding pot, acid, etc. in your teens.
Open User Options Menu

leon79

the_iron_goose wrote:
leon79 wrote:
As a former semi-heavy smoker (3 packs a day), I was one of the lucky few that found it easy to quit (then again, I'm quite stubborn, and was probably motivated by being told how hard it would be), though I don't doubt how hard it is for others.

The best advice I can give is to time your quitting smoking to coincide with other major changes taking place in your life. In my case, I quit right before I got married, moved, changed jobs, etc., so the smoking seemed to get lost in the pack and I barely noticed the withdrawal.

How many hours did you quit for Leon?



I'm not sure I understand your question.
Open User Options Menu

saseme

ZEZ wrote:
Did Arthur ever quit or did he continue to smoke till the end? The reason I ask is, that it seems like such a hard habit to break. It doesn't matter if a person has Asthma, Bronchitis, or even Emfazema. They'll die with that last cigarette in their hand.

I've seen people with oxygen tanks still smoking. And even people with no arms in wheelchairs asking people to lite their cigarettes. I've heard before that it's even harder to give up then heroin. I've never tried drugs, unless it was perscribed by a doctor, so I don't know. I guess the best way would just not to start. Any thoughts?


This obviously isn't the only example, but why would someone stop smoking who had a terminal illness, or simply didn't give a f*%k anymore?

If you're way old why stop? So you'll make 90 instead of 85, all the while lying in bed accumulating bed sores and crapping your dacks.

People start for a variety of reasons, like the one mentioned about the military, or if you started before much was known to the public about the health effects, or peer pressure, or f*$k you to your parents, or the government or something, who knows.

I often feel that people do bad things to themselves and to other people as a response to feeling or being controlled by other people. Call it the FU response.
Open User Options Menu
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy