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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Push-ups
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Tony84

I have been doing some reading online and i keep finding articles on high volume push up routines. Like 500 push ups 3 times a week. These guys claim that they have built large amounts of muscle mass doing this routine. People like Herschel Walker swear by these routines. Anyway im wondering if anyone has tried such a routine.

I know a lot of you are going to say its bull and thats fine maybe it is but i want to hear from someone who has really tried this routine. Thanks for your time guys.
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Thorwalsh

I can only speak from personal experience, but when working out for Jiu Jitsu competitions I routinely did 200 pushups 5 days a week. 2 sets of 100 reps. No gains in muscle mass, although I wasn't trying to gain mass with that kind of program. Guys like herschel Walker could probably gain muscle mass on anything as he is so genetically gifted.

Pushups have their place in certain types of training but for mass building, nothing beats progressive resistance exercise with weights.
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Mr. Strong

Recently I've been training bodyweight only, with great results, in terms of size, strength and endurance it works just as well if not better than weightlifting.

Remember the most important part of exercise is the effort.
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decker14626

New York, USA

look at the physiques of olympic gymnasts. They do no weight training, only body weight movements, 5-6 days per week, the same movements everyday, and they have great bodies.
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Ciccio

decker14626 wrote:
look at the physiques of olympic gymnasts. They do no weight training, only body weight movements, 5-6 days per week, the same movements everyday, and they have great bodies.


cause or effect?

Actually, high rep, high volume work (doesn't matter if it is high rep push up or high rep bench press) can work for some people and will do shit for others.
It has nothing to do with the exercise per se but all with the individual.
Still, everybody who employs high rep push ups (50+) probably uses bad form and would be surprised how little he could do in strict, smooth form.

Franco
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manzo

decker14626 wrote:
look at the physiques of olympic gymnasts. They do no weight training, only body weight movements, 5-6 days per week, the same movements everyday, and they have great bodies.


I see this said quite a lot - gymnasts dont do weight training, just bodyweight movements - but how do you know if gymnasts strength train with weights (other than bw) or not?

Ive never done gymnastics and i dont watch/read about it so i admit dont know about it, but il bet that some do some form of strength training using equipment other than just bodyweight.

And by bodyweight movements do you mean the movements that they use in competition, or things like push ups, bw squats,pull ups, chins, crunches ,etc which would be considered bw movements/exercises ?
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DTS

Arthur once said (can't recall exactly where I read it) that he new a guy that did nothing but dips and pullups, and that this guy's build would impress almost anyone.
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Growl

The push-up can be everything from the greatest upper body exercise to a complete waste of time.
If you are light and have short arms, then perhaps you can do them as easily as walk. For such a person, there is little value in the push-up as far as building muscle is concerned.
For some, the pushup is challenging. The average person will find it somewhat challenging, that's why militaries use them for fitness. A very heavy man with longer arms may get as much from the push-up as any upper body movement he will ever do.
I was severely injured as a teenager and unable to train for a few months. When I got the go ahead, I couldn't do even five push-ups. Within a few months, I was doing sixty-five. I believe I stopped building muscle somewhere between forty and fifty reps. When I realized I had milked it as much as I could, I did other things. There is a point of diminishing returns.
P.S. I touched my chest to the floor at the bottom and straightened my arms completely at the top. My body was held very rigid and the exercise was done in good form but at a pace which maximized the rep total with no intentional slowing. I believe my weight was around 140lbs. at the time. This was in 1985.
Jeff
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kata14

Have you guys ever tried NEG push ups?
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Mr. Strong

The press up can take anyone to a very high if not the highest level the individual can acheive. You do not need to do bench presses, flyes, or cable bloody cross overs to build your chest to its potential, all you need is the good old press up.
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Growl

kata14 wrote:
Have you guys ever tried NEG push ups?


Negative push-ups are a wonderful tool for many purposes.
I have family members and friends who cannot do regular push-ups practice with negatives. I do caution them about the pain to come if they push too hard the first few times out.

Please be careful when letting people know of these. Out of shape folks can get very motivated and push real hard on them because they find they can actually do them. They will not be able to move their arms for the next week, but they may shoot you when they finally can.
Jeff
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decker14626

New York, USA

alan1 wrote:
decker14626 wrote:
look at the physiques of olympic gymnasts. They do no weight training, only body weight movements, 5-6 days per week, the same movements everyday, and they have great bodies.

I see this said quite a lot - gymnasts dont do weight training, just bodyweight movements - but how do you know if gymnasts strength train with weights (other than bw) or not?

Ive never done gymnastics and i dont watch/read about it so i admit dont know about it, but il bet that some do some form of strength training using equipment other than just bodyweight.

And by bodyweight movements do you mean the movements that they use in competition, or things like push ups, bw squats,pull ups, chins, crunches ,etc which would be considered bw movements/exercises ?


I did a web search a while ago, and found an interview with a gymnastics coach. I can't remember much, but they do a lot of dips, and ring work. A lot of it is odd excerises I've never heard of, but are for their specific moves. There was a good article on T-Nation about this. It was an interview with a coach, and he describes some odd weight moves to develope the muscles that gymnasts use on their routines.
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DrFist

I remember someone recommended to me that tensing the chest and triceps until it's sore and then performing push ups is a way to increase the difficulty of the exercise.
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veganmaster

Marlon Birch, natural bodybuilder who uses pure isometric contraction only. He won the Amateur Lightweight title as listed here:
http://www.inbf.net/.../caribbean.html


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Tony84

First i just want to say thanks for the posts. The only reason i asked about the push ups is because after i workout my knees are always a little sore the next day. so i was thinking about trying something new. Is having a little pain in your knee after working out normal?
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spud

Push-ups used to be called floor dips.

I prefer to do them on parallel bars, not the floor. :o)
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decker14626

New York, USA

Ciccio wrote:
decker14626 wrote:
look at the physiques of olympic gymnasts. They do no weight training, only body weight movements, 5-6 days per week, the same movements everyday, and they have great bodies.

cause or effect?

Actually, high rep, high volume work (doesn't matter if it is high rep push up or high rep bench press) can work for some people and will do shit for others.
It has nothing to do with the exercise per se but all with the individual.
Still, everybody who employs high rep push ups (50+) probably uses bad form and would be surprised how little he could do in strict, smooth form.

Franco


I agree, high reps (12-15) work better for me than low reps (6-8).
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Paul25

Push-Ups are a great exercise and are just Bench Presses turnaround. How can you incrase the Itensity other than raising your feet, glowing slower and adding a vest belt?
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gizmo

- stay tight
- don't drop; lower yourself (I don't think it necessary or more beneficial to go all the way down)
- push up, but don't lock out
- never rest at the top, once you reach the top position immediately start lowering yourself for the next rep. keep it a continuous movement
- move at a 2/2 to 4/4 pace (of course if you really want to have some fun move at 10/10 pace)
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Paul25

Cheers lads,
Sorry for the bloody poor grammer!
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Ray200

I seem to recall "Weighted Push-Ups" in the letters section of an old Hardgainer issue. Simply place a plate onto your back and proceed as normal. As the weight goes up you can keep each plate in place with a piece of solid tubing or a dumbbell handle; also it might be wise to use some kind of matting to prevent the plates sliding off (strongly advised from personal experience!). I worked up to 60kg for fairly high reps (15-20). Hope this helps.
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manzo

Having someone provide manual resistance to your upper back while performing push ups can increase intensity aswell.
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