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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
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This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Ellington Darden, Ph.D.

Landau Lifts Large
How a HIT routine for several small, ignored, upper-arm
muscles can increase the size of your biceps — quickly!


David Landau has been a frequent contributor to this Web site for several years. He's an experienced bodybuilder with a pair of large, well-developed arms.

I met Landau in 1982. He was in charge of the Nautilus room at the YMCA in Warren, Ohio. He and his two workout partners often called me at the Nautilus Headquarters in Florida with questions.

In 1984 David moved to Miami, Florida, and opened a personal-training business. David also brought with him a serious interest in the history of exercise and fitness. Over the last two decades, he's assembled a nice collection of related books, articles, and materials.

More recently, Landau has accumulated copies of much of Arthur Jones's filmmaking library — which included early Nautilus videos — and transferred them to DVDs.

A month ago, I invited David to drop by my new home and private gym. He informed me that he would attend a fitness convention in Orlando in late November and he would drive over the next day.


A UNIQUE, UPPER-ARM ROUTINE

Landau arrived at my front door about 1:00 PM on December 1, 2007. After an hour of catching up, I challenged him to try a new arm routine that I had designed especially for him. David accepted my challenge.

In case you'd like to try the same routine, here's how it looked on paper:

Front upper arms

Back upper arms

Before I describe the listed exercises, I want to explain my reasoning behind this routine.

First, I knew David liked working his biceps and I was sure he had not focused much on exercises involving the brachialis and coracobrachialis muscles. These muscles lie under the biceps and, when fully developed, can add mass to the biceps area. The deep muscles on the front of the upper arm are trained with the hammer curl, reverse curl, and parallel-grip chin.

Second, I knew David had never used a Bowflex machine, so I wanted him to give it a test drive.

Third, I figured he was not accustomed to using a thick bar and I had one available.

Fourth, after the biceps I decided to blast his triceps on the Bowflex machine with some nonstop triceps extensions followed by bench presses.


DESCRIPTIONS OF THE EXERCISES

Bowflex lying curl, hammer grip, stage repetitions: I use a Bowflex Ultimate machine for this movement, but other Bowflex machines could be easily adapted. Place the seat in the flat position. Sit facing the Power Rods. Lean forward and grasp the left handle in your left hand, but instead of holding it in a supinated position, slide your hand in front of the handle and hold both straps securely with a thumbs-up or hammer grip. Your hand at the top should be firmly against the backside of the handle and it doesn't matter if the handle is straight or perpendicular to your forearms. Either style will work.

With your right hand, grasp the other handle and assume a similar hand position. Lie back with your torso and keep your arms straight. Stabilize your body by placing both feet on the Bowflex frame.

Thumbs-up curl the resistance to your shoulders. Pause and lower the handles halfway down and curl the handles smoothly to the highest level without moving your elbows. Pause, lower halfway, and repeat for 8 to 12 half repetitions. On the last rep, lower the handles until your arms are straight.

Thumbs-up curl the resistance halfway up. Pause, and then lower the resistance until your arms are straight. Again, do not move your elbows. Perform 8 to 12 bottom-half reps. Drop the handles, stand up quickly, and move to the reverse curl.

Reverse curl with a thick-handled barbell: With a pronated grip, pick up the thick bar with your hands slightly wider than your shoulders and stand. Keep your elbows stable. Lean forward slightly and reverse-curl the barbell smoothly. Near the top, extend your head and let the bar touch your forehead. Pause and lower the bar slowly. Repeat for 8 to 12 reps. On the last rep, place the thick bar on the floor, and move immediately to the chinning bar.

Negative-only chin with a parallel grip, for 1 very slow rep: The Nautilus Multi-Exercise machine is perfect for this exercise since the top parallel bars are 21-inches apart. If you don't have access to such a machine, or something similar, hold onto a standard chinning bar with a pronated grip.

Climb up the stairs, grasp the handles, and get ready to lower yourself for 30-60 seconds. You're going to really feel the effects in the lower part of your biceps and below, clear to the bone. It's best to have a buddy, with a watch with a second hand, call out your time in seconds (5, 10, 15, 20, and so on) as you descend.

Begin at the top and hold the highest position as long as possible — which won't be long. Continue to hold, or try to hold, each segmented level. Your goal is to be halfway down at 30 seconds. Try to keep your elbows in vertical alignment with your hands.

David made exactly 60 seconds on the lowering, which was indeed a yeoman's effort. Afterward, he commented that he felt a very tight, thorough pump in the front of his upper arms. Then, it was into his triceps exercises.

Bowflex seated triceps extension, stage repetitions: Adjust the seat to the 45-degree position and sit facing away from the Power Rods. Grasp the handles, bring to the shoulders, and then straighten your elbows. Keep your elbows stable and lower the handles so they are by your ears. This is your starting position.

Push the handles vertically, but come to a smooth stop at the halfway point. It's important to keep your elbows stable. Lower to the bottom and repeat for 8 to 12 reps. On the last rep, extend your elbows completely. You're now ready for the top-half stage.

With your thumbs on the handles nearly touching, lower the handles to your forehead. Press the handles smoothly in an arc until your elbows are straight. You should feel an intense contraction in your triceps. Crank out 8 to 12 reps. On the final repetition, with no adjustment of the Power Rods, move right into the bench press.

Bowflex bench press: The idea here is to use your pectoral muscles, which have not been significantly worked, to force your exhausted triceps to a deeper level of fatigue. With the handles shoulder-width apart, press the handles over your chest and lower smoothly until your thumbs are near your shoulders. Grind out as many reps as possible and then try 1 more. You should be able to get 8 or more reps.


REST AND GROW

After working his upper arms, David took a 5-minute rest. What a pump he had. By the time I retrieved my camera, 15 minutes had passed since he finished his brief, specialized routine. His guns were still loaded, as you'll see in the attached picture.

David Landau is 5' 8" tall and weighs a solid 170 pounds.
His personal training business in Miami, Florida, is called
Advanced Exercise. At 50 years of age, David has a
history of lifting large to develop his upper arms.
This routine may be just what he needs to
get a little more mass on his biceps.


For the last year, Landau has been training no more than once a week. He realizes that muscles grow, not during the exercise, but during the REST in-between workouts.

Anyone who has been training for more than 10 years, as David has, can often benefit from three or four consecutive workouts that target smaller, often-neglected muscles — such as the brachialas and coracobrachialis. If you fall into this category, why don't you consider applying this specialized routine?


SUBSTITUTE EQUIPMENT

I'm aware that many of you don't have access to a Bowflex machine, a thick-handle barbell, nor a Nautilus Multi-Exercise machine. Here's what you can substitute for them and still get a unique workout for your upper arms. Review the previous exercise directions, as the basic instructions still apply.

Front upper arms

Back upper arms

Give this specialized routine a trial for three consecutive workouts and let me know your thoughts. David Landau will also be available on this thread to answer questions directed to him.

 

Discuss this article | Text Version

waynegr

Switzerland

Hi all,

Nice photo nice arms David, am I right in saying your biceps have always been quite good, and are your best bodypart, as they seem to have a bigger triceps to biceps ratio than most other people, if you get what I mean, it showed more in your other double pose photo.

Sounds like a good workout Ellington.

Funny reading this as my triceps are extremely pumped, as I just did a set of stage reps after my, D.C.T. training, and one set of shoulder press, I did the stage reps on the on the pressdown, 15 reps at the bottom, 15 midway and ouch 15 at the top.

In my opinion Ellington the stage reps are one of your best ever techniques. I first heard you mention them in the Super High Intensity book, could you if you have time give us all the full story on how they came about, as the pain and pump is one of the best.

Wayne
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Benjamin Dover

I spoke to David on Tuesday and he was very excited about the routine. It's always good to see an old school HIT advocate applying tried and tested principles. The results speak for themselves.

David, I'm just about to call a certain Scotsman, he needs to see this thing!
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McNultyEssex

Interesting article; I wasn't aware that those exercises stimulated the brachialis and corobrachialis more effectively.

I wonder whether experiments could be conducted over this forum by putting willing volunteers into different training groups. Providing everyone was honest, perhaps we could learn something from experience, as opposed to reading others' opinions.

As an example, I would be interested to know whether arm growth was greater with the outlined arm routine alone, or with lower body exercises in the same routines too.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Thanks for the cool routine, Ellington. I will give it a shot in my New Year arm blast.

David's arms look great, but I can see where they'd benefit from the brach development. It should add more fullness on the outside of the arm.

I will attest that added brach focus this past year has aided my arm girth quite well.

Best of Luck,
Scott
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cargo

This is a Awesome article!

David definitely has some Guns.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

cargo wrote:
This is a Awesome article!

David definitely has some Guns.


I've always been jealous of David's arms. Wish I had muscle bellies like those.
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BennyAnthonyOfKC

Missouri, USA

THICK-BAR ADVICE:

I do not know if this is too obvious, but maybe it will help someone newer and/or younger. If you are unable to gain access to a thick-bar for either reason of expenses or your location is not so easy for mail-order companies to get their heavy package to you, THEN YOU CAN FAIRLY EASILY ADAPT PIPE FROM EITHER A JUNKYARD OR A HARDWARE STORE.

It is unlikely that you can find pipe that would perfectly slide in an Olympic; however, you can attach either two bolts through the pipe at opposite ends about a foot from the ends or tack some small welds with similar spacing. Second, at the hardware store, you can certainly buy pipe-collars, or something like them, so you can trap weight-plates between the bolts and collars.

OR.............

You can do a search on my profile on this board to find out what I said about BOOKBAGS. With that, you can attach the CANVAS BOOKBAGS to PVC-piping that is about 4-inches in length per hand. Of course, the one drawback that some trainees might complain about is that the repetitions need to be slow enough as to prevent the weight in the bookbags from violently swaying back and forth.

These booksbags can be large enough and sturdy enough to easily hold FIVE TO SEVEN 10-POUND PLATES PER BAG, albeit it is best to double and triple bag these bags so the handles will not rip after a few uses!

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Landau

Florida, USA

The Advanced Training Applications of Ellington Darden got my attention immediately! Ellington understands how to have you train the "meat and potatoes" part of that muscle. There are Arbitrary Time Sentenced Protocols that simply don't address the muscle, as you become a secondary slave to a "set time." Ellington dissects the muscle and takes you way beyond what you might think.

I have known Ellington since around just after 1980. My parents lived merely 15 minutes from Lake Helen at that time and I was a frequent visitor. I often visited Ellington in his office where outside of it there was a room full of Nautilus. I remember my earliest visit where he had the Super Geared Hip and Back, a machine that I had never seen before. (Ell may remember the date) I was invited to Lake Helen as early as 1979, so sometime close after that. Being Young and Enthusiastic, I use to bomb Ell with many questions. The answers were given back instantly in a sentence or less.

I knew this Guy was for real all about the facts. He was always meeting with Doctors and they would virtually let each enthusiast know whether they had the genetic potential or were flops. They looked straight through your body right down to the bone, looking at aspect ratios and muscle lengths. You knew right then where you stood. They were only interested in the truth and were not there to sell you any crap and "butter you up" so to speak.

So Bottom Line, if you want to experience the experience from an era LONG GONE, this is as good as it gets. You will experience training from the TRUE EXPERT, not some phony BS Artist who claims to be one. The Program is worth its weight in GOLD.
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BennyAnthonyOfKC

Missouri, USA

David,


Your arms certainly are pumped in that recent photograph of yourself; plus, as they remarked above, you are very blessed with some long muscle-bellies in your biceps! It was nice to have Darden recognize you, as your HISTORICAL ENDEAVORS are worthy merely by themselves!

Happy Holidays!


Sincerely,

Benny


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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

BennyAnthonyOfKC wrote:
THICK-BAR ADVICE:

I do not know if this is too obvious, but maybe it will help someone newer and/or younger. If you are unable to gain access to a thick-bar for either reason of expenses or your location is not so easy for mail-order companies to get their heavy package to you, THEN YOU CAN FAIRLY EASILY ADAPT PIPE FROM EITHER A JUNKYARD OR A HARDWARE STORE.

It is unlikely that you can find pipe that would perfectly slide in an Olympic; however, you can attach either two bolts through the pipe at opposite ends about a foot from the ends or tack some small welds with similar spacing. Second, at the hardware store, you can certainly buy pipe-collars, or something like them, so you can trap weight-plates between the bolts and collars.


Or you can go the quick, poor man's route: Get some pipe insulation from your hardware, Home Depot, or Lowes. Now's the season when you'll have the best selection!

The black rubber cylinders with a slit down one side should have the most resiliency.
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Robert Francis

New York, USA

Landau wrote:
...So Bottom Line, if you want to experience the experience from an era LONG GONE, this is as good as it gets. You will experience training from the TRUE EXPERT, not some phony BS Artist who claims to be one. The Program is worth its weight in GOLD.


Thanks Doc for starting this article. Dave and I talk alot of the old days in Lake Helen and at Jumbolair during the 80's heyday and how those rich experiences are lost forever-beyond the reach of todays younger instructors.
Over the phone I was eating my heart out listening to every detail of his visit and workout in your new facility. Just like David to not merely SEE the goods but to dig in and get dirty and not pass up a chance to get trained on realdeal Darden gear by you.
z....
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HeavyHitter32

David,

How did you like the Bowflex?
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mrhighintensity

Nevada, USA

I have seen his Videos on youtube and must say i am truly impressed by his form and execution! - a great ambassador for HIT!

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FuManchu

I'm unlearning and relearning training so forgive me for what may be a novice question.

For the last 3 weeks I've been following the full-body workout routine(s) as outlined in "Living Longer, Stronger".

How should this kind of training be incorporated (if at all)? Should this be added to the full-body routine (3 per week for me right now). Or do I drop bis/tris from the "regular" workout and have a once per week workout doing what Dr. Darden has outlined above?

My arms could certainly use growth in the brachialis area and this sounds like something I should use in my training. But I'd like to use it properly considering my goal (mainly fat loss).

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DennisD

I'm 58 years of age and have been training for many years, primarily with free weights. Injuries(shoulder pain)have forced me to back off as of late. I had considered purchasing a bowflex, but I've read so many pros and cons about the machine. Can someone enlighten me as to the quality of resistance?

One thing I continually hear is that approximately the first half of the exercise is too easy because the rods haven't bent sufficiently. Is that correct?
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Ellington Darden

DennisD wrote:
I'm 58 years of age and have been training for many years, primarily with free weights. Injuries(shoulder pain)have forced me to back off as of late. I had considered purchasing a bowflex, but I've read so many pros and cons about the machine. Can someone enlighten me as to the quality of resistance?

One thing I continually hear is that approximately the first half of the exercise is too easy because the rods haven't bent sufficiently. Is that correct?


Dennis,

Those Bowflex Power Rods will be a great find for your shoulders. Going from easier to harder may be exactly what your need. If not, you can reverse the resistance curve by doing the last half of the movement first and the first half last.

Ellington

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HeavyHitter32

DennisD wrote:
I'm 58 years of age and have been training for many years, primarily with free weights. Injuries(shoulder pain)have forced me to back off as of late. I had considered purchasing a bowflex, but I've read so many pros and cons about the machine. Can someone enlighten me as to the quality of resistance?

One thing I continually hear is that approximately the first half of the exercise is too easy because the rods haven't bent sufficiently. Is that correct?



Dennis,

You can also buy much smaller/shorter hooks and handles which will increase the tension in the first half of the movement.

Still, I am starting to incorporate some fre weight exercises so that I get an overall, more balanced training strength curve. I figure with the Bowflex and free weights, I'm getting all the resistance needed in a specific range.


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Chris Jones

Well, how about that - Landau gets tuned into (and perhaps turned onto) the Bowflex via his reuniting with Ell. That?s sure encouraging (as another said here) that a traditionalist like David has found something redeeming in the Bowflex (al beit Darden implemented).

David always told me: ?I can tell you this, Chris, if Dr. Darden says it, you can trust it implicitly.? (Dr. Darden is well-regarded in his circles for his filtered thinking, healthy skepticism and reason. My firm respect for him is reinforced with this characteristic.)

After purchasing a Bowflex years ago, meeting with demonstrable results, becoming a Dr. Darden enthusiast (acquiring most of his publications), and taking interest in Ken Hutchins? super-slow routines, I looked up David and we met up at Dan Marino?s Restaurant here in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

David was using a nice downtown high-rise facility with his clients? sessions for his unique ?advanced exercise protocol? routines. David did some work with me in the gym, but just as much was gained over detailed dinner meetings and phone conversations.

At the time, we were mustering up ideas for a unique training facility that incorporated all his learned insights over the years towards exercise and promoting them in said facility ? something I still hope to do with David, and hopefully with some consultation from Ell and special speaking appearances (on my tab) promoting his ?Intensive Coaching? package.

Additionally, as I am producing/funding in the entertainment industry now, particularly with reality shows, I have some great ideas where this is concerned. Anyway, David was never a big fan of the Bowflex and generally regarded this as something gimmicky, and that Ell was involved with Bowflex largely as a marketing element towards (understandably) boasting his name and career and would likely not share the same enthusiasm once he met up with him personally thereafter.

However, as Ell points out here, seemingly acknowledged by David, Ell has even made a believer out of David. The folks at Bowflex may not know this, but the biggest recent endorsement they could have hoped for is the conversion of one David Landau ? they have made great strides there! 

I recall that through the several months to a year that David and I were having dinner, there was a time where he was getting just a tad soft (not that I always had ample room to talk). We spoke about how Ell Darden (through this outlet and his books) had called out those within his circles and demanded that they get serious and set the right example.

David said that this calling meant guys like him and that he was going to go through a big curb for results.

Wow did he mean it. The next time I saw David he was huge, super cut, and was sporting a super ripped six-pack, and was as sharp and as focused as ever! (The power of Darden is not just physical, let me tell you.)

David, of course, in his own right, was always a very determined guy, more or less, even though for one reason or another we never pulled the trigger on our initial ambitions, then. Glad to learn that David is still pressing on with his exercise themes as diligently as ever.

I will have to look him up again here soon and have him beat me back into the best shape of my life. Perhaps we?ll engage with Ell?s Intensive Coaching protocol, David Landau style!

Hope you?re well, David. Good to see you pioneering onward.

Ell, glad life is treating you so well there in Celebration. (There was a report that you and your family had moved to Jackson, Tennessee??)

PS, you said in this posting that you had known that David had not used a Bowflex. Well, actually, not quite so. David had indeed used my Bowflex while over at my place years back, although never a full, serious routine, and very reluctantly ? largely to appease me!

All the best. If you are going to do any touring to promote any of your new works or programs, have me know.







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Chris Jones

Somehow, within my posting, all the quotation marks, parentheses and apostrophes became question marks when submitted to this site. Very unsightly.

Can the editors here correct the problem?

Thanking you kindly in advance.
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Landau

Florida, USA

Chris: Yes, it's been a while. PM me through this site and I can now show you what we are now doing in Aventura. David
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karma50

Guys,
Have any of you HIT trainers tried the Bowflex Revolution yet? I sould be interested in hearing more about it from HIT enthusiasts.
Griff
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Chris Jones wrote:
Somehow, within my posting, all the quotation marks, parentheses and apostrophes became question marks when submitted to this site. Very unsightly.

Can the editors here correct the problem?

Thanking you kindly in advance.


That problem usually only happens when you write your text in another program (MS Word, for example) and then copy it into the Message: box.

As you can see, "quotation marks" typed directly in the Message: box show-up just fine.
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chasbari

Ohio, USA

Ellington and David,
I am about ready to pull up stakes and move to Florida to catch up with what I have missed over the last 25 years. I figure I can split my time between the two of you geniuses with the travel time being necessary to absorb the wisdom.

Thanks for keeping this website going. Not all the learning is happening by posting but rather by reading the quality information in posts like these.
Chuck
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mmtbb

What is the significance of splitting the work into upper and lower sections of movement? Is this a Bowflex thing?
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