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Aerobics with Weights?
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AndrewOldham

Hi

I recently read up on HeavyHands training and the authors theories interested me. The exercise is basically aerobics/ calesthenics with hand weights in order to simultaneously develop the aerobic capacity of the lower and upper body.

He says that doing this makes the entire aerobic capacity better but also has some good affects on fat burning. He claims that sort of exercise not only burns more calcories per min than most other forms (except perhaps similar, rowing etc) but the aerobic exercise also increases the number of mitochondria in the muscles used.

The increase mitochondria allow the body to use glucose in the system more effectively and thus improve metabolism and aid in weight loss.

What do you guys think of these ideas? Could it be worth combining this form of exercise with strength training to reduce the need for dieting? The author does not recommend diets!

Finally, a quick question. What do you guys think of the windmill exercise? I feel like when i do it that it's building some good functionality and practical strength. Is there any reason i shouldn't be doing windmills?

Thanks for any answer to my questions. I appreciate your help.
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NewYorker

New York, USA

bad idea. The weights will alter your form and lead to joint damage.

windmills are a poor exercise. the same muscles are more effectively and safely worked using stiff-legged-dead-lifts (arguably the best free weight exercise) and side bends.
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Mr. Strong

What is the Windmill exercise?
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Nick1971

Texas, USA

Closest I can think of doing aerobic activity with weights would be to do circuit training. It's not quite strength training, but it's not as dangerous as slinging weights around.
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AndrewOldham

Hi

I've heard previously about not using weights to throw punches for example, as i read it can be bad for joints.

However, the author of the book is still doing it and very healthy judging by his website.

Just out of interest. Do you think throwing punches while holding bands would be as bad for you as holding weights?

Has there been studies linking repetition weight exercises with bad joints?
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HrothgarRannulfr

Ohio, USA

For weighted cardio/aerobics, I use a weighted vest on a stepper.

If you want to try this, please note that it can lead to injury.

If you decide to try it, you might want to try walking while wearing a weighted vest, first. Not too heavy, though. Maybe only 5 pounds, at first. It'll probably seem too easy, but It takes some getting used to. It's harder on your body than you might think.

Also, you'll want to walk on fairly level ground so as not to injure your ACL or develop iliotibial band syndrome. There's some pretty interesting information on this on the net.

I've worked up to using the weighted vest on the stepper for anywhere between 5 and 15 minutes a few times a week. It's added some size to my legs, too. Not huge by any means, but it's a definite difference.

However, I find that it cuts into my recovery ability for other exercise, though. So, when doing this in addition to other exercises, I need to cut back on other things. I've found that it's really important to actively maintain flexibility in the hips and hamstrings, both of which are important in avoiding the possible problems mentioned above. I have a lot of experience in martial arts, though, so I'm familiar with what to do to maintain that flexibility. If you're not, I recommend seeking qualified guidance in this area when doing any sort of weighted aerobics/cardio.

My own resistance workout, right now, is pretty much as follows:

1. Stepper w/Weighted Vest (5 minutes)
2. Push-Ups
3. Chin-Ups
4. Push-Ups
5. Chin-Ups
6. Stepper w/Weighted Vest (5 minutes, sometimes more)
7. Abs (Reverse Trunk Curl & Trunk Curl)

Exercises 2-5 are performed HIT style using Rest/Pause. Three bursts in each set with minimal time in between. In total, it's roughly 12 minutes of push-ups and pull-ups in between the weighted stepper segments.

I do this combination twice a week. Once I get to my goal on the push-ups and chin-ups, I plan to add a few other basic exercises.

I, also, do the weighted vest on the stepper by itself a couple of times a week for longer durations (usually 10 to 15 minutes).

I, also, do a few minutes on the exercise bike most mornings just to get the blood flowing and wake up. It's nowhere near all out, though. I only get my pulse rate up to about 100-110 when doing this. I don't consider it a workout, but I find it helps.

Someone mentioned the idea of increasing the number of mitochondria through weighted aerobic exercise. I find that idea highly interesting. I'm no expert on that subject, but I'd like to think that it could work. I feel like it has for me, but I've no way of proving or testing it that I know of other than by how I feel both when exercising and not exercising.

Once more, though... I believe that doing weighted cardio/aerobics can lead to injury, especially if not done correctly. I believe it is much more dangerous than Dr. Darden's New HIT protocols. Please, be careful if you do decide to do it and take extra care to guard your flexibility.
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physcult

How does someone do aerobics/cardio carefully? Surely stepping/running /walking/cycling is something you either do or you don't do?

I presume you mean carefully increase the duration and weight? Im guessing you dont mean slow cardio????
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AndrewOldham

HrothgarRannulfr

Thanks for the in depth reply. I believe (although have no proof to hand) that high repetition exercise increases mitochondria in the muscles used to help increase circulation etc to those muscles.

The author of Heavy hands knew that some arobic exercises had good fitness in their lower body but had poor upper body fitness. The weighted vest would not affect upper body fitness really. I think you need to use the muscles of the upper body in aerobic fashion to stimulate the adaption.

I have the feeling that HIT would work well with this sort of exercise.
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medici

Spain

Hardly a new idea. Vince Gironda's density training excelled in doing just that. These days, Scott Abel's metabolic enhancement training leads the pack with pro and amateur bodybuilders getting big, lean, and avoiding metabolic damage from hours of cardio.

T-Nation has quite a few of his articles on line and Iron Man featured a large two part article on his new era training last summer. Having said that, it's also important to understand such training is the opposite of HIT in that it emphasizes progressive intensity training and surfing the curve of various parameters of strength.

The P90X system is a version of such training as is some of Christian Thibaudeau's routines.
Probably have to keep your metabolic type in mind before making a choice.
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HrothgarRannulfr

Ohio, USA

physcult wrote:
How does someone do aerobics/cardio carefully? Surely stepping/running /walking/cycling is something you either do or you don't do?

I presume you mean carefully increase the duration and weight? Im guessing you dont mean slow cardio????


Thanks, physcult.

I was referring to the weight, intensity, duration, and techniques involved.

There are a great variety of cardio techniques of both high and low impact from plyometrics to walking. In my opinion, some are more dangerous than others. For example, in my earlier post, I mentioned the dangers of ACL injury and iliotibial band syndrome. I believe that the danger of both is dramatically increased by things as simple as walking with a weighted vest on an uneven surface in such a way that one hip is slighlty higher than the other for the majority of the time due to the terrain.

Another example would be in the technique used on the exercise, itself. For example, when using the weighted vest on a stepper (or even just a stepper in general, but more so with the vest because of the amplified effect from the extra weight) greater than normal care must be given to not hyperextend or twist the knees unnaturally. With the vest, even though it may feel OK while performing the exercise, damage might still be done if the technique is off.

Also, regulating the weight and intensity is interesting. My understanding of cardio is that it's primarily about increasing the heart rate. That can be done both through fast or slow movements depending upon resistance.

For instance, Dr. D's New HIT protocol definitely increases the heart rate with slow movements. Also, I can exercise on a machine like an ArcTrainer or EFX utilizing its resistance settings to achieve the desired heart rate at a lower strides per minute pace.

Also, though such things as riding a recumbent exercise bike might seem like an either do it or don't do it... There's still subtle differences in technique and equipment settings that can lead to injury over the thousands of revolutions of pedalling. Same thing with other types of cardio.

Hope this helps.
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HrothgarRannulfr

Ohio, USA

AndrewOldham wrote:
HrothgarRannulfr

Thanks for the in depth reply.


You're welcome.

AndrewOldham wrote:
I believe (although have no proof to hand) that high repetition exercise increases mitochondria in the muscles used to help increase circulation etc to those muscles.

The author of Heavy hands knew that some arobic exercises had good fitness in their lower body but had poor upper body fitness.


Definitely agree that its possible to have good lower body fitness without having good upper body fitness. That's one of the reasons I'm concentrating on push-ups and chin-ups, right now.


AndrewOldham wrote:
The weighted vest would not affect upper body fitness really. I think you need to use the muscles of the upper body in aerobic fashion to stimulate the adaption.


That's seems reasonable. My experience with the vest, though, does indicate an amazing effect upon stamina.

And, as we're talking about the idea of incresing mitochondrial counts, assuming that it is true that this occurs from cardio (especially weighted cardio), is it reasonable to conclude that the mitochondrial increase would be localized to only to the muscles worked with high rep weighted exercises? It does seem like a good possibility that that's the case.

AndrewOldham wrote:
I have the feeling that HIT would work well with this sort of exercise.


I really believe that it does.
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HrothgarRannulfr

Ohio, USA

medici wrote:
Hardly a new idea. Vince Gironda's density training excelled in doing just that. These days, Scott Abel's metabolic enhancement training leads the pack with pro and amateur bodybuilders getting big, lean, and avoiding metabolic damage from hours of cardio.

T-Nation has quite a few of his articles on line and Iron Man featured a large two part article on his new era training last summer. Having said that, it's also important to understand such training is the opposite of HIT in that it emphasizes progressive intensity training and surfing the curve of various parameters of strength.

The P90X system is a version of such training as is some of Christian Thibaudeau's routines.
Probably have to keep your metabolic type in mind before making a choice.


Thanks for sharing this information, medici. I found it very helpful!!!
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AndrewOldham

Medici

Heavy Hands has been around since the 70s and was popular in the early 80s.

The weights used are very light, 1 - 10 pounds. 10 pounds being the maximum recommended weight. The idea is to get a pure and steady aerobic affect from the exercise. Not to try and achieve hyperthrophy also.

The ideas you mentioned seem more like an attempt to get cardio benefits while using heavy weights in an exlposive fashion.

Heavyhands would be more akin to rowing or cross country sking, or perhaps even boxing etc.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Nick1971 wrote:
Closest I can think of doing aerobic activity with weights would be to do circuit training. It's not quite strength training, but it's not as dangerous as slinging weights around.


The best thing I can think of doing aerobic activity with weights would be HIT with minimal rest periods.

The shortsighted part of the 'circuit training' philosophy is their insistence that you must do high-rep sets (15-20 reps) with light weights to get the heart rate elevated.

As you may have experienced, a 5-10 rep set of slow, hard reps will get your HR better elevated than any lightweight weeny set.

Slight rests between HIT sets give you an "interval" effect that has been demonstrated to be very effective for cardiovascular health.

HIT was honed in the '70s, but has levels of effectiveness and efficiency that will keep it a great workout regimen for the ages.

On the other hand, some things were rightfully left in the '70s like pet rocks, leisure suits, and Heavy Hands.

Peace and Love,
Scott
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gizmo

From a Dew Baye article:

Those interested in workouts geared towards metabolic conditioning may like to give the workout I did earlier tonight a try. It is a modified version of the CrossFit workout called ?Cindy?. The CrossFit version of Cindy consists of as many rounds as possible of the following exercises in 20 minutes:
? 5 pull ups (usually performed with a kipping motion)
? 10 push ups
? 15 bodyweight squats
The modified version I did tonight used variations of the same exercises, with added weight and shorter time (15 minutes):
? 5 strict weighted chin ups (190 pounds bodyweight plus a 25 pound dumbbell held between the ankles)
? 10 push ups with narrow hand spacing (inside shoulder width)
? 15 squats with 25 pound dumbbells

All reps were performed in slow, controlled manner, with a brief pause at the top of the chin ups. During the fifth and sixth rounds I had to rest a few seconds after the third and fourth reps on the chin ups to complete five. I was able to complete six rounds in 14:34, after which I started feeling a little nauseous and could have sworn the temperature in the house went up 20 to 30 degrees, so I crawled into the bath tub and filled it with cold water. It seemed to do the trick, because I felt completely recovered within a few minutes.

Normally, I would not hold a dumbbell between my ankles to add weight to chin ups. A chinning and dipping belt is a much better option. I decided to hold a dumbbell between my ankles in this workout only because it is faster than getting into and out of the belt and I wanted to move quickly between exercises.

When planning a routine geared more towards metabolic conditioning, the emphasis needs to be on involving as much muscle as possible at a high level of effort while minimizing rest between exercises. While multiple sets of an exercise may not be necessary for stimulating muscular strength and size increases, when trying to maintain a high level of effort for some period of time it is more efficient and often more practical to repeat a circuit of a few exercises than to try moving quickly between a larger number of exercises.

Very few gyms are set up like the old Nautilus centers with lines of equipment meant to be used one after the other in single set fashion. The circuits in most big gyms are poorly organized and often bogged down with people performing a needlessly high amount of reps or sets making it impossible to train in a near continuous fashion. This can even be difficult at times in private one-on-one personal training centers set up specifically for high intensity training if there are too many instructors working with clients at once.

By choosing a few exercises that can be performed with little or no equipment or with a barbell or dummbells it is possible to move very quickly between them, maintaining a high level of effort for the duration of the workout. The workout I performed tonight required only a chin up bar and a set of dumbbells.

With the dumbbells positioned right below the chin up bar I was able to move between the chin ups, push ups and squats with no rest at all.
The exercise sequence should rotate between different muscle groups to allow one muscle group to recover while others are working so that local muscle fatigue is not as much of a limiting factor.

I prefer the sequence typically used in 3?3 high intensity training routines:
? Hips and thighs
? Upper body pushing
? Upper body pulling

For the upper body pushing and pulling exercises I prefer to pair opposing movements in the same plane. For example, presses and chin ups, barbell rows and dips, handstand push ups and pull ups, push ups and bodyweight rows, etc.

My co-worker Michael Lauro often adds abdominal work to this sequence, although depending on the exercises the abs may already be getting plenty of work. Squats, deadlifts, chin ups, presses, push ups, and many other exercises all involve the abs to varying degrees. If you want to include direct abdominal work I recommend doing it at the end of the routine unless the other exercises do not place a significant demand on the abs.

Some exercises, like squat presses - AKA ?thrusters? - combine two of the above, resulting in an exercise with an even greater metabolic demand. One of the most dreaded CrossFit workouts, ?Fran?, alternates between thrusters and pull ups. If such an exercise is performed, try to select other exercises that don?t overlap too much, unless you are specifically trying to work one area very hard.

This can often be done with legs, but if too much is done for the upper body then local fatigue tends to become a limiting factor.
If doing bodyweight exercises, repetition count should be based on the difficulty of the exercise; the higher the difficulty the lower the reps, and vice versa. I would not go lower than 5 or higher than 20.

If 20 is not challenging enough you should select a more difficult exercise or add weight. You?ll get a greater metabolic effect from several higher intensity sets than fewer longer sets of lower intensity. If you can?t do at least 5 then the exercise is challenging your strength more than your conditioning and you need to select an exercise you can perform 5 or more reps of for multiple sets.

If doing free weight or machine exercises, I recommend a moderate rep range for the upper body and a slightly higher range for the lower body - 10 to 15 and 10 to 20. These are high enough to produce a significant cardiovascular and metabolic demand while still being in a range that is effective for strength and size (assuming a moderate rep speed - the slower the rep speed, the lower the repetition range should be to keep the weight heavy enough and the set duration low enough).

I recommend keeping the overall time frame between 10 and 20 minutes. If the level of effort is high enough, this is more than enough to do the job. The Tabata protocol, a method of high intensity interval training shown to be highly effective, requires only four minutes to perform: eight rounds of 20 seconds at maximum effort divided by 10 second rest periods.

With a high enough intensity of effort, you don?t require much exercise to stimulate an adaptive response. If bodyweight exercises are used and you are highly conditioned you may want to go for higher times. If you are using additional weight or not well conditioned use a lower time.

If using weights or performing more challenging bodyweight exercises, you may want to perform a specific number of rounds for time, rather than performing as many rounds as possible over a fixed time. How many depends on your level of conditioning.

I recommend starting with three, and increasing it if you are not completely wiped out by the end of the last round. If doing fixed rounds you may also want to start with a higher rep count for the first round, decreasing each round, similar to the 3?3 high intensity training routines.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

NewYorker wrote:
bad idea. The weights will alter your form and lead to joint damage.


These issues were documented with Heavy hands users back in their hay day.

windmills are a poor exercise. the same muscles are more effectively and safely worked using stiff-legged-dead-lifts (arguably the best free weight exercise) and side bends.

Agreed.

However, windmills work well as static (no-weight) stretches following any workouts with hammies and lower back in them.
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AndrewOldham

Simon

Thanks for the reply. You say issues were well documented. What issues were they? It seems to me that i'd be taking your word for it to just accept that as it is and for i know you may of pulled it out of thin air.

Why don't rowers and cross country skiers face joint issues? They don't tend to.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

AndrewOldham wrote:
Simon

Thanks for the reply. You say issues were well documented. What issues were they? It seems to me that i'd be taking your word for it to just accept that as it is and for i know you may of pulled it out of thin air.

Why don't rowers and cross country skiers face joint issues? They don't tend to.


I didn't make it up, however I don't have anything but my memory right now to back up my claims. Will research. It was something about joint strain from the swinging of weights with the MOST momentum being at the point of extension.

Rowing and CC skiing are not comprable activies to the HH 'experience'. These two sports they have the LEAST momentum in the extended position. You're talking apples and oranges.
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southbeach

First get up to speed without added weight. your BW alone is plenty of challenge for most.

i alternate rower, treadmill and stepper. in addition every morn @6am i work the heavy bag for an hour.. kicks and punches.

i have yet to need any added weight to my frame
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southbeach

Endurance exercise found to slow aging.

http://www.nst.com.my/...icle/index_html

can't say the same for explosive exercise
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southbeach

Running slows the aging clock, Stanford researchers find
By ERIN DIGITALE


STANFORD, Calif. ? Regular running slows the effects of aging, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine that has tracked 500 older runners for more than 20 years. Elderly runners have fewer disabilities, a longer span of active life and are half as likely as aging nonrunners to die early deaths, the research found.?The study has a very pro-exercise message,? said James Fries, MD, an emeritus professor of medicine at the medical school and the study?s senior author. ?If you had to pick one thing to make people healthier as they age, it would be aerobic exercise.? The new findings appear in the Aug. 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

When Fries and his team began this research in 1984, many scientists thought vigorous exercise would do older folks more harm than good. Some feared the long-term effect of the then-new jogging craze would be floods of orthopedic injuries, with older runners permanently hobbled by their exercise habit. Fries had a different hypothesis: he thought regular exercise would extend high-quality, disability-free life. Keeping the body moving, he speculated, wouldn?t necessarily extend longevity, but it would compress the period at the end of life when people couldn?t carry out daily tasks on their own. That idea came to be known as ?the compression of morbidity theory.?Fries? team began tracking 538 runners over age 50, comparing them to a similar group of nonrunners. The subjects, now in their 70s and 80s, have answered yearly questionnaires about their ability to perform everyday activities such as walking, dressing and grooming, getting out of a chair and gripping objects. The researchers have used national death records to learn which participants died, and why. Nineteen years into the study, 34 percent of the nonrunners had died, compared to only 15 percent of the runners.

At the beginning of the study, the runners ran an average of about four hours a week. After 21 years, their running time declined to an average of 76 minutes per week, but they were still seeing health benefits from running.On average both groups in the study became more disabled after 21 years of aging, but for runners the onset of disability started later. ?Runners? initial disability was 16 years later than nonrunners,?? Fries said. ?By and large, the runners have stayed healthy.?Not only did running delay disability, but the gap between runners? and nonrunners? abilities got bigger with time. ?We did not expect this,? Fries said, noting that the increasing gap between the groups has been apparent for several years now. ?The health benefits of exercise are greater than we thought.?Fries was surprised the gap between runners and nonrunners continues to widen even as his subjects entered their ninth decade of life. The effect was probably due to runners? greater lean body mass and healthier habits in general, he said. ?We don?t think this effect can go on forever,? Fries added. ?We know that deaths come one to a customer.

Eventually we will have a 100 percent mortality rate in both groups.?But so far, the effect of running on delaying death has also been more dramatic than the scientists expected. Not surprisingly, running has slowed cardiovascular deaths. However, it has also been associated with fewer early deaths from cancer, neurological disease, infections and other causes.And the dire injury predictions other scientists made for runners have fallen completely flat. Fries and his colleagues published a companion paper in the August issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine showing running was not associated with greater rates of osteoarthritis in their elderly runners. Runners also do not require more total knee replacements than nonrunners, Fries said.

?Running straight ahead without pain is not harmful,? he said, adding that running seems safer for the joints than high-impact sports such as football, or unnatural motions like standing en pointe in ballet.?When we first began, there was skepticism about our ideas,? Fries said. ?Now, many other findings go in the same direction.?Fries, 69, takes his own advice on aging: he?s an accomplished runner, mountaineer and outdoor adventurer. Hanging on his office wall is a photo he jokingly describes as ?me, running around the world in two minutes.? In the dazzling image of blue sky and white ice, Fries makes a tiny lap around the North Pole.Fries collaborated with Stanford colleagues Eliza Chakravarty, MD, MS, an assistant professor of medicine; Helen Hubert, PhD, a researcher now retired from Stanford, and Vijaya Lingala, PhD, a research software developer. The research was supported by grants from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and by the National Institute on Aging.

> Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2008 08:25:46 -0600> From: phillips@kcnet.com> To: cr@lists.calorierestriction.org> Subject: Re: [CR] Endurance exercise anti-aging?> > Yo Conrad,> > I have taken up running also. There are lots of anecdotal stories about> knee damage from running. So far I have seen no problems. But I was> curious if you do anything in particular to avoid such problems - limit> speed, distance, or anything else.> > Bob Phillips> Stilwell, KS> > >> >> > On 11/18/08 10:45 AM, "PMcglothin@aol.com" <PMcglothin@aol.com> wrote:> >> >> Excellent summary of exercise and CR> >>> >> _http://websites.afar.org/site/PageServer?pagename=IA_expert_mccarter_> >>

(http://websites.afar.org/site/PageServer?pagename=IA_expert_mccarter)> >> >> > Sorry, Paul, but this is *not* an "excellent summary of exercise and CR",> > instead, the opinion by Roger McCarter, PhD, in infoaging.org deals with> > "INTENSE EXERCISE, oxidative damage, and caloric restriction".> >> > This distinction is important. Your post was apparently made in response> > to> > the highly significant paper by Lanza et al., 2008 Aug 20,> > "Endurance Exercise as a Countermeasure for Aging"> > posted by Dr. Al Pater on November 17, 2008 [1]> >> > You keep promoting your way of "soft" exercising by doing a gentle walk in> > the park.> > This is simply not enough, you need to get your blood flowing and rushing> > all the way to your brain at least at 75% to 80% of maximum heart rate> > (depending on age) for *at least* a few minutes as part of a minimum> > 30 minutes, better 45-60 minutes daily exercise regimen - by jogging,> > swimming, cycling, rowing - whatever is best and (eventually) enjoyable> > for> > a person in the long run.> >> > Lanza et al. deal exactly with the vital aspects of exercise and aging.> > The assumption that CR and exercising work synergistically in promoting> > healthy aging as well as, hopefully, extended longevity, appears to be> > justified and quite reasonable.

CR and exercising certainly do not exclude> > one another!> >> > After reading the Lanza paper yesterday I came to the very personal> > conclusion that I will run for the rest of my life, far beyond my 75th> > birthday, which is nine months away - provided that my legs will carry me> > another five- or ten thousand miles [since I started running ten years> > ago,> > after an MI, I have covered the distance from Hawaii to New York - on> > foot.> > Well, running almost every day makes you feel like your body and your mind> > (which is *the same*) can almost walk on water . . .> >> > Got to go . . . jogging.> >> > Aloha,> > C.R.> >> >> > [1] Lanza IR, Short DK, Short KR, Raghavakaimal S, Basu R, Joyner MJ,> > McConnell JP, Nair KS.> > Endurance Exercise as a Countermeasure for Aging.> > Diabetes. 2008 Aug 20. [Epub ahead of print]> > PMID: 18716044> >> > ABSTRACT> >> > OBJECTIVE> >> > We determined whether reduced insulin sensitivity, mitochondrial> > dysfunction, and other age-related dysfunctions are inevitable> > consequences> > of aging or secondary to physical inactivity.> >> > RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS> >> > Insulin sensitivity was measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and> > ATP production in mitochondria isolated from vastus lateralis biopsies of> > 42> > healthy sedentary and endurance-trained young (18-30 years old) and older> > (59-76 years old) subjects. Expression of proteins involved in fuel> > metabolism was measured by mass spectrometry. Citrate synthase activity,> > mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) abundance, and expression of nuclear-encoded> > transcription factors for mitochondrial biogenesis were measured. SIRT3, a> > mitochondrial sirtuin linked to lifespan-enhancing effects of caloric> > restriction, was measured by immunoblot.> >> >

RESULTS> >> > Insulin-induced glucose disposal and suppression of endogenous glucose> > production were higher in the trained young and older subjects, but no age> > effect was noted. Age-related decline in mitochondrial oxidative capacity> > was absent in endurance-trained individuals. Although endurance-trained> > individuals exhibited higher expression of mitochondrial proteins, mtDNA,> > and mitochondrial transcription factors, there were persisting effects of> > age. SIRT3 expression was lower with age in sedentary but equally elevated> > regardless of age in endurance-trained individuals.> >> > CONCLUSIONS> >> > The results demonstrate that reduced insulin sensitivity is likely related> > to changes in adiposity and to physical inactivity rather than being an> > inevitable consequence of aging. The results also show that regular> > endurance exercise partly normalizes age-related mitochondrial> > dysfunction,> > although there are persisting effects of age on mtDNA abundance and> > expression of nuclear transcription factors and mitochondrial protein.> > Furthermore, exercise may promote longevity through pathways common to> > effects of caloric restriction.> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> > ____________________________________


oh ya i know that ;)))
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AndrewOldham

Thanks for the replies. I think perhaps controlling calories maybe a better way to go on reevaluation, thanks.
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AndrewOldham

I've been doing some more reevaluation ;)

I've been trying the above "crossfit" style cardio adapted to be safer.

I do:
body weight squats
Push ups
Back row from my dip frame (reverse pushup)

I get a tremendous cardio affect from this and can only do 4 sets currently, back to back with no rest.

My reps deterioate rapidly.

Squat Press Up Row
12 12 12
12 12 10
12 10 8
12 8 6

Then i'm done in.

I was thining that combinding this with a much lighter 20 min run later in the week done at a steady state might give a good rounded cardio affect.

I'm doing only one HIT workout a week and that seems to work well for my recovery.

The remaining workouts of mine being light, like yoga or martial arts practice.
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Mr. Strong

AndrewOldham wrote:
I've been doing some more reevaluation ;)

I've been trying the above "crossfit" style cardio adapted to be safer.

I do:
body weight squats
Push ups
Back row from my dip frame (reverse pushup)

I get a tremendous cardio affect from this and can only do 4 sets currently, back to back with no rest.

My reps deterioate rapidly.

Squat Press Up Row
12 12 12
12 12 10
12 10 8
12 8 6

Then i'm done in.

I was thining that combinding this with a much lighter 20 min run later in the week done at a steady state might give a good rounded cardio affect.

I'm doing only one HIT workout a week and that seems to work well for my recovery.

The remaining workouts of mine being light, like yoga or martial arts practice.


You are most likely better off sticking with the above routine rather than a 20 minute run, especially at this time of the year.
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Tom Traynor

Trap-bar deadlift>>>30 secs rest>>>Chins>>>30 secs.>>>dips. 60 seconds rest, then repeat 3-4 cycles. Sets should be with a weight that BARELY allows 40-70 seconds TUL. Done.

Problem is you will never see a study showing benefits of this---Tabata protocol may have some similairities....
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