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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

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entsminger

Virginia, USA

jn6047 wrote:
entsminger wrote:
After looking back over the book, something else Paul mentioned that was of high importance for this program to work was to control your environment. Managing stress in your life. Everything needs to be methodical and work synergistically to reach YOUR specific GOAL.
I know we all know all these things, but the mind-body motivation cannot be over-stated. Train for a specific reason and make sure you do all the things out of the gym to complement your specific goal.

==Scott==
And half the time that is impossible to do. You get too many hours at work or situations at work stress you out.Things happen at home and family that cause unwanted stress, you get worn down and even sick at times and you just have to keep going. Lifting the weights is the easy part. Unless you are a pro body builder who has nothing to do but eat and train there are so many things that happen in ones lives that get in the way of making gains that it's to many to count.

Anyone can bomb the muscles to the point where they should grow if you allow them to regardless of what system you use. It's allowing them to grow that can be the difficult part if you actually have a life and get out and do things that need to be done.


Excuses. I run my own gym, work a full time job for another company, and a part time job besides. Every work week is at least 60 hours, not including work I do on weekends. I get up week days at 7:30AM, work at 8:00AM, and I get home most nights after 10:00PM. I still find time to train, sleep, eat, etc. Most people have goals, most do not have the discipline to achieve them.

jn6047


==Scott==
Excuses my ass! I train in spite of a busy schedule like you have but discipline can't overthrow the stress and things in life that get in the way of recovery. To achieve a goal of building consistent muscle like I would like to I would have to sacrifice family obligations and the like and family is more important to me than muscles hense the muscle recovery takes a back seat and progress comes rarely.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

fbcoach wrote:
jn6047 wrote:

Excuses. I run my own gym, work a full time job for another company, and a part time job besides. Every work week is at least 60 hours, not including work I do on weekends. I get up week days at 7:30AM, work at 8:00AM, and I get home most nights after 10:00PM. I still find time to train, sleep, eat, etc. Most people have goals, most do not have the discipline to achieve them.

jn6047


Thank you. I saw this after my above post. With this sort of attitude displayed (not yours), it's no wonder individuals buy into the fantasy programs. It's simple....you want to get bigger and stronger, have a plan to increase weights lifted using good form and follow the appropriate diet. Making it more than what it is is a surefire way to frustration.


===Scott==
How am I making it out to be more than it is? Obviously you must have an easy life with not much going on so you can train and eat as you please. For real world people who actually get off their ass and do things other than in the weight room it can be very tough to have the energy to recover from tough workouts when the daily duties in life get in the way in the form or stress, lack of sleep etc etc. As I said before, having a plan to workout regularly to increase the weights is the easy part. Having the reserve energy to recover from such workouts and life in general is something that is hard to come bay when one works hard and has many family duties.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
I've often struggled with the ideal frequency of training a muscle. I've trained a muscle anywhere from three times per week to once every three weeks. For me, I think anywhere from every 5-9 days is ideal depending on that type of routine, intensity, volume, etc. Now, 5-9 days is fairly broad, but closer to 5-7 I think is right on the money...


Caveat: IF one is doing whole body workouts. If you do Splits, it should be less IMO.
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HeavyHitter32

simon-hecubus wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
I've often struggled with the ideal frequency of training a muscle. I've trained a muscle anywhere from three times per week to once every three weeks. For me, I think anywhere from every 5-9 days is ideal depending on that type of routine, intensity, volume, etc. Now, 5-9 days is fairly broad, but closer to 5-7 I think is right on the money...

Caveat: IF one is doing whole body workouts. If you do Splits, it should be less IMO.


Agreed. Training a muscle every 5th day can only be accomplished on a full body/CR routine (for myself).

For me, it generally comes down to this: I can tolerate about two fairly hard sessions per week so long as there are not a ton of exercises in each one or super crazy intensity.
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fbcoach

entsminger wrote:
fbcoach wrote:
jn6047 wrote:

Excuses. I run my own gym, work a full time job for another company, and a part time job besides. Every work week is at least 60 hours, not including work I do on weekends. I get up week days at 7:30AM, work at 8:00AM, and I get home most nights after 10:00PM. I still find time to train, sleep, eat, etc. Most people have goals, most do not have the discipline to achieve them.

jn6047


Thank you. I saw this after my above post. With this sort of attitude displayed (not yours), it's no wonder individuals buy into the fantasy programs. It's simple....you want to get bigger and stronger, have a plan to increase weights lifted using good form and follow the appropriate diet. Making it more than what it is is a surefire way to frustration.

===Scott==
How am I making it out to be more than it is? Obviously you must have an easy life with not much going on so you can train and eat as you please. For real world people who actually get off their ass and do things other than in the weight room it can be very tough to have the energy to recover from tough workouts when the daily duties in life get in the way in the form or stress, lack of sleep etc etc. As I said before, having a plan to workout regularly to increase the weights is the easy part. Having the reserve energy to recover from such workouts and life in general is something that is hard to come bay when one works hard and has many family duties.


Sounds like you are trying to rationalize your lack of gains or make excuses. I will stand by my original post. If you want to get bigger and stronger, you will learn to find the way to achieve this. If you just want to go thru the motions of a workout and pay no attention to programming, recovery methods, and diet, then you will continue getting what you got, while searching for your "Windmills"....all the while, the answers have been right in front of you all along.

Scott....thru your little emotional tantrum, I really couldn't tell what you were implying. I merely said, when you can lift more weight in good form, your muscles will grow, as well. For example, if one can Bench Press 200lbs for 1x10, then a year later, can Bench Press 300lbs for 1x10, I am saying LOUD and CLEAR that this individual's upper body will be significantly bigger. I am also saying you don't have to spend hours in the weight room. Which part don't you agree with? That the muscles will be bigger? Or, you can do this on abbreviated training? I really can't tell what you are implying. The way you wrote your post it sounded like you were implying that YOU can't progress to heavier weights or recover from 1-2x/weekly workouts. If that is the case, then you need to look at YOUR programming, diet, or recovery methods. As much as you are on this forum, your life is apparently no busier or more stressful than most other members here.

The last point I will address is if you are only increasing your weights by 10-20lbs in a year, then you really can't expect to notice HUGE changes in your appearance. But when you make 50-100lb increases you will see a difference. I will add....these increases take TIME. It's the small increases you make every month that add up over time and that will make the difference. Are you suffering from the "gotta have it now" mentality, and jumping from program to program, never having any indicators to establish progress?
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sgb2112

I doubt anyone who has been training 20-30 plus years is still getting stronger consistently never mind 50-100lbs increases in compound exercises..drug free at least.. if anything, the weights are being recycled.

Hypertrophy is possible without the main focus being strength increases. The science is out there and overfiftylifter has posted reams of such. Renex, Jreps, matrix etc. Brian Johnston has laid on slabs of muscle using less resistance than in his powerbuilder days.
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Tony Williams

fbcoach wrote:
Tony Williams wrote:
Below is a portion of an interview with Brodeur from Dec. 2008 which I read a few weeks ago on another site:

DH: Paul what does your workout routine consist of?

PB: I lift One Set to Failure.

DH: How often or frequently do you work out?

PB: Once every 7 to 15 days.

DH: How has that been working for you?

PB: It's been just wonderful, since I decreased the volume and frequency even more, my strength and size vaulted to the sky. Even better I used to have problems with injuries, now I'm healthier and stronger than ever.

DH: Paul tell me more about the injury?

PB: The injury that comes to mind was on the bench press. I was training in preparation for a contest and I didn't realize it at the time. I had all these guy spotting me and my last warm up was heavy and I thought about ending the work out right there. Then they said, "AW come on Paul just hit a big weight for a couple just to get a feel, because the meet is coming up." So because I'm such a competitive guy and easily fired up, I said OK put on a couple more wheels and I wound up injuring myself badly but I learned from it.

DH: What exactly did you learn?

PB: First to pay attention to your training journal, it's easy to get caught up in the excitement and competition. Instinctively great athletes will try and push their limits, most of the time too often; you must allow for recovery and strength increases especially as your lifts get heavier you need more rest. I can recruit many fibers, lift a lot of weight and do a bunch of damage. I have to be very careful and not let others or my emotions and instincts take over my precise meet preparation. When I did I was injured and imploded the muscle and actually ruptured and killed muscle tissue forever. Another thing I would like to say is that correct form is also VERY important to avoid injuries.

The rest of the interview can be found here:

http://joeaverageboard.proboar...

Tony



These interviews are misleading. I have read all of them. I have his e-books. He recommends training 1-2x/week and NTF on the Powerlifts. His program is basically an abbreviated Powerlifting/Stengthbuilding program. It is very sensible and not at all dogmatic as many HIT programs. If an individual uses common sense and understands how to modify a routine to fit your individual needs, this is a great program.

As I mentioned earlier, his recommended routine was 8-12 exercises that could be performed on one day or split into 2x/week with the Powerlifts on one day (NTF) and the assistance exercises (close-to-failure) on the other. My e-book is the 2012 updated version.

He also talks about diet (gaining muscular weight, losing fat, etc.), training, and the need for conditioning exercises, such as sled work and Farmer's Walk. He also recommended several warm-up sets on the Powerlifts. His routine would take about 1 hour if performed briskly.

In my opinion, this is a great program for size, strength, or getting lean. I am training every 5 days with sometimes performing a conditioning day between workouts or walking for 1 hour with my wife 2-3 days between. My strength, size, and leaness are at their peak since my last surgery. Here are some stats since using a modified version of this routine since January 1st:

Height: 5'8 1/2 (5'9 with shoes:)
Weight: 195lbs
Waist: just under 32in
STRENGTH
Bench
1x3 (+2 reps) 315lbs and climbing
DeadLift
1x3 (+2 reps) 410lbs
HammerStrength Bench
1x10 (+5 reps) 270lbs
Chest Supported Rows
1x10 (+5 reps)230lbs
LatPulls (underhand closegrip)
1x10 (+4reps) 227.5lbs

These are just a few #s. I am quite pleased with this program.


(edited 3-26-12 8:32 CDT)

Brodeur either said those words in the interview, or he did not.

Now, he may have changed his mind. But those seem to be his views at the time the interview was given whenever that was.

I am not attempting to mislead anyone. As far as I can tell, the interview is legitimate. If you read the entire interview, at that time, he was a hardcore Mentzer disciple. In addition, it seems clear those were his views regarding powerlifting and other powerlifters.

If I can locate Brodeur, I will ask him directly what he now believes regarding training.

Tony
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fbcoach

Tony,
I have read the interview with Paul Becker and yes, that was what was printed. However, Paul made it clear in his book, his words were misleading, especially his quotes about Fred Hatfield. Maybe I wasn't clear. Paul was heavily influenced by Mentzer (to be clear, so was I), but he didn't agree on everything. For example, he and his clients did not train less than 1 weekly workout, however he did recommend what he called a "bye" week every few weeks. He did not recommend training to complete failure, but "near failure".

In his book, he recommended a routine of 12 exercises with warm-up sets for 1 top set that would take approximately 1 hour or a second workout of 6x3 using 60% of 1 RM. He also recommended heavily, conditioning such as sled work, Farmer's Walk, etc. As far as my knowledge, Mentzer didn't recommend any of this. This was my original point.

Too many HIT enthusiasts try and paint HIT into a cozy little corner, while alienating an extremely productive system. No matter what some other idiots on here try to say, I am an advocate of HIT. I don't agree with some of the tenets other may believe, but make no mistake, my workouts are INTENSE, BRIEF, AND INFREQUENT and I have the build and strength to prove it works....and at least in my case and the athletes and people I train.

Again, my original point was these interpretation of Pauls articles stating to do one set workouts every 10-15 days is not what he recommended or even close to what he recommended in his books.
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Tony Williams

fbcoach wrote:
Tony,
I have read the interview with Paul Becker and yes, that was what was printed. However, Paul made it clear in his book, his words were misleading, especially his quotes about Fred Hatfield. Maybe I wasn't clear. Paul was heavily influenced by Mentzer (to be clear, so was I), but he didn't agree on everything. For example, he and his clients did not train less than 1 weekly workout, however he did recommend what he called a "bye" week every few weeks. He did not recommend training to complete failure, but "near failure".

In his book, he recommended a routine of 12 exercises with warm-up sets for 1 top set that would take approximately 1 hour or a second workout of 6x3 using 60% of 1 RM. He also recommended heavily, conditioning such as sled work, Farmer's Walk, etc. As far as my knowledge, Mentzer didn't recommend any of this. This was my original point.

Too many HIT enthusiasts try and paint HIT into a cozy little corner, while alienating an extremely productive system. No matter what some other idiots on here try to say, I am an advocate of HIT. I don't agree with some of the tenets other may believe, but make no mistake, my workouts are INTENSE, BRIEF, AND INFREQUENT and I have the build and strength to prove it works....and at least in my case and the athletes and people I train.

Again, my original point was these interpretation of Pauls articles stating to do one set workouts every 10-15 days is not what he recommended or even close to what he recommended in his books.


First, Coach ... are we talking about the same person?

In your first sentence above, you mention a Paul BECKER. I posted an interview with Paul Brodeur.

If we both are discussing Brodeur, is he now claiming that he was misquoted in the interview?

Because that interview is straightforward and crystal clear. Brodeur states he trained one set to failure every 7-15 days and trained his clients in a similar fashion.

If quoted correctly, there is nothing unequivocal about what he said.

Nothing wrong with changing one's mind, I am not stating that. However, if he is claiming that the interview is misleading, I don't buy it because he toes the Mentzer line of training from the first sentence to the last.

All I am interested in is what he learned that apparently made him change his training.

Tony
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fbcoach

I was talking about about Paul Becker interviewing Paul Brodeur. Yes, he claimed he was was somewhat misquoted by Becker. He is influenced by Mentzer, but when he said he does 1 he does a single set 1x/week, he meant a single set of several exercises with several warm-ups.

Sort of like Dorian Yates style. He definitely trains his clients 1-2 weekly with a "bye" week every 4 weeks....meaning they take off an extra week. This was very clear in his books. He never mentioned training less than every 7 days, with the exception of the bye week. He also recomended training "near failer" (his exact words). Anything else I would gladly relay. There was nothing even close to 1 set every 7-15 days.
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Turpin

Coach wrote; Too many HIT enthusiasts try and paint HIT into a cozy little corner, while alienating an extremely productive system. No matter what some other idiots on here try to say, I am an advocate of HIT. I don't agree with some of the tenets other may believe, but make no mistake, my workouts are INTENSE, BRIEF, AND INFREQUENT.

......................................

Turpin writes; Very much my take on things `Coach`.
It would seem that some would believe that anything over 1-2 sets and exceeding 10 mins in duration is NOT `HIT` , yet these same individuals are tinkering with `nothing` in terms of resistance in their workouts and refuse to concede that increases in resistance IS also an increase in overall intensity.

T.

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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Devil's Advocate: With an off/bye week every 4 weeks, the '15 days' misinterpretation makes sense.

3/4 of the time, one takes 7 days between training a specific exercise.

1/4 of the time, it's 15 days between.
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fbcoach

Turpin wrote:
Coach wrote; Too many HIT enthusiasts try and paint HIT into a cozy little corner, while alienating an extremely productive system. No matter what some other idiots on here try to say, I am an advocate of HIT. I don't agree with some of the tenets other may believe, but make no mistake, my workouts are INTENSE, BRIEF, AND INFREQUENT.

......................................

Turpin writes; Very much my take on things `Coach`.
It would seem that some would believe that anything over 1-2 sets and exceeding 10 mins in duration is NOT `HIT` , yet these same individuals are tinkering with `nothing` in terms of resistance in their workouts and refuse to concede that increases in resistance IS also an increase in overall intensity.

T.



Yeah, I agree T. I really am a firm believer in "to each his own". My original point was what was being interpreted by Paul as "performing a single-set workout" every 15 days was no where what he recommends in his book or even close to that. He does recommend a single-set of each exercise (I guess he doesn't count warm-ups, but he definitely says to do them) with a recommendation of 12 exercises. He also recommends if training 2x/week a 6x3reps with the same weight (60% RM) and 45 seconds between sets for the 2nd workout. I found that odd, considering he thinks so highly of Mentzer's training, but I am not that surprised, because this is very similar to Jim Wendler's recommendation, as well.
Another tenet you may be interested in....he recommends cganging exercises every 4 weeks after a "bye" week. Personally, I like keeping specific exercises as indicators of progress.

Two other tenets that differ from Mentzer is he uses cardio (mainly walking), either while bulking or cutting to minimize fat gain, and he recommends a few "Conditioning" days and exercises (sledwork, strongman drills, etc.).
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fbcoach

simon-hecubus wrote:
Devil's Advocate: With an off/bye week every 4 weeks, the '15 days' misinterpretation makes sense.

3/4 of the time, one takes 7 days between training a specific exercise.

1/4 of the time, it's 15 days between.


I can see how that is misinterpreted Scott, but nowhere in his book does he say to continue on a frequency of more than 7 days between workouts. That is part of the misintpretation I was talking about.
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HeavyHitter32

I've talked about this before, but I experimented with some really infrequent stuff in the past such as one workout every 10-12 days (leg press, pulldown, dips for one set each) and it was a definitely step in the wrong direction. Sure, I was completely recovered and felt great, but reached a point where I eventually couldn't progress and started looking detrained.

I've also tried training a muscle group every three weeks (training once per week on a 3 way split) and that was even worse for me. Obviously, anything can be taken too far but it was a good learning experience for me. You never know until you try with this stuff.

I am going to try a more "intense" training cycle very soon, but it will consist of more exercises and freq. compared to the above.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

fbcoach wrote:
entsminger wrote:
After looking back over the book, something else Paul mentioned that was of high importance for this program to work was to control your environment. Managing stress in your life. Everything needs to be methodical and work synergistically to reach YOUR specific GOAL.
I know we all know all these things, but the mind-body motivation cannot be over-stated. Train for a specific reason and make sure you do all the things out of the gym to complement your specific goal.

==Scott==
And half the time that is impossible to do.


This where motivation, knowledge, and values become important. It is either important to you or it is not.




Lifting the weights is the easy part.



Then, there shouldn't be any problems unless you make excuses.


Unless you are a pro body builder who has nothing to do but eat and train there are so many things that happen in ones lives that get in the way of making gains that it's to many to count.



This is a cop-out. Lifting is either an impiortant part of your life or it's not. The time one spends on this forum is more than enough time to train.




Anyone can bomb the muscles to the point where they should grow if you allow them to regardless of what system you use. It's allowing them to grow that can be the difficult part if you actually have a life and get out and do things that need to be done.



I don't really understand what you're saying here. One hour once or twice a week is not much of a sacrifice.


==Scott==
Yes, I can see you don't understand what I'm saying. Let me repeat it... The workout part of building muscle is the easy part. Most anyone including myself can work the muscles to the point that the arms want to fall off during a specific workout. There's always time for the workout. The hard part is the recovery phase.Many times the responsibilities and things life throws your way get in the way of allowing for full recovery by the next workout.You might think you're recovered but many times you're not but you still workout anyway and progress gets thwarted even more.I worked out over a week and a half ago and due to hectic work on the job and home I still don't feel recovered enough to hit the weights again. I'm pretty much exhausted right now.This hectic draining schedule may continue on for another week hense my workout schedule gets a real kick in the butt.All the discipline and fortitude in the world can't over come that.
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Turpin

Scott wrote; Many times the responsibilities and things life throws your way get in the way of allowing for full recovery by the next workout.You might think you're recovered but many times you're not but you still workout anyway and progress gets thwarted even more.

..................................

Turpin writes; Scott I believe that too many place an emphasis on a workout having to exceed the efforts of a previous workout in order to say that one is recuperated sufficiently to train again. I don't believe this to be true.
Bio-feedback should tell you what your efforts on workout day should be. ie; Go for it when feeling energetic and back off a little on intensity when your not , but I firmly believe that progress will be further halted ( & de-conditioning will ensue ) with lengthy recovery.

T.


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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Turpin wrote:
Scott wrote; Many times the responsibilities and things life throws your way get in the way of allowing for full recovery by the next workout.You might think you're recovered but many times you're not but you still workout anyway and progress gets thwarted even more.

..................................

Turpin writes; Scott I believe that too many place an emphasis on a workout having to exceed the efforts of a previous workout in order to say that one is recuperated sufficiently to train again. I don't believe this to be true.
Bio-feedback should tell you what your efforts on workout day should be. ie; Go for it when feeling energetic and back off a little on intensity when your not , but I firmly believe that progress will be further halted ( & de-conditioning will ensue ) with lengthy recovery.

T.




==Scott==
Working out and recovery is a tough balancing act. Sometimes I feel like crap and have a great workout and sometimes I'm all energized and can't even do what I did the last workout. There's so many factors involved in the process that it makes progress seem non existent sometimes.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

==Scott==
I think you are right Turps that one doesn't always have to do better each workout to make it worth while but being the sort of perfectionist that I seem to be I get down on myself when I don't make some kind of progress. Needless to say I'm down on myself quite often, ha ha..
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Turpin

entsminger wrote:
Turpin wrote:
Scott wrote; Many times the responsibilities and things life throws your way get in the way of allowing for full recovery by the next workout.You might think you're recovered but many times you're not but you still workout anyway and progress gets thwarted even more.

..................................

Turpin writes; Scott I believe that too many place an emphasis on a workout having to exceed the efforts of a previous workout in order to say that one is recuperated sufficiently to train again. I don't believe this to be true.
Bio-feedback should tell you what your efforts on workout day should be. ie; Go for it when feeling energetic and back off a little on intensity when your not , but I firmly believe that progress will be further halted ( & de-conditioning will ensue ) with lengthy recovery.

T.




==Scott==
Working out and recovery is a tough balancing act. Sometimes I feel like crap and have a great workout and sometimes I'm all energized and can't even do what I did the last workout. There's so many factors involved in the process that it makes progress seem non existent sometimes.


I totally agree Scott , which makes waiting till one feels refreshed to workout a nonsense.
I personally keep to around 2 days between workouts regardless of energy levels & simply vary my efforts according to my bio-feedback each workout OR if I have had a pretty heavy session ( much like I did yesterday with belt squats ) then I`ll have a lighter session next time I workout.

I believe the above approach a further step forward in allowing for recovery whilst negating de-conditioning from my previous cyclical effort programmes where I would stick rigidly to my scheduled resistance reps , & a giant step forward in regards to recovery from training to failure and attempting to exceed previous efforts each/every time out.

T.
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fbcoach

entsminger wrote: The workout part of building muscle is the easy part. Most anyone including myself can work the muscles to the point that the arms want to fall off during a specific workout.quote]

I don't agree with you at all and believe this to be your way of rationalizing lack of progress. That's not to say you're wrong in being unable to handle the stress of your life. Only YOU can determine or control that.

If the workout is the easy part, then there shouldn't be any problems. Who mentioned anything about working until your arms fall off? Certainly not me. I am talking about consistently adding resistance to the bar and continuing to do this over long periods. If you are unable, unwilling, or just don't know how to go about this, don't post your BS that the reason others can is because they have a "perfect" life. You don't know me or many of the members on here personally, and to make such a statement is ignorant.

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Tony Williams

Paul Brodeur on MikeMentzer.com:

www.mikementzer.com/quotesarchive.html

Scroll down to:

"A Texan with the Strength of Conviction"

"Allow me to introduce myself - I am Paul Brodeur. I squatted 1,000 pounds weighing 318 lbs. with 10 percent bodyfat, making the Powelifting All-Time Top 20 List, while utilizing only high-intensity training principles.

"Through reading and listening to Mike Mentzer's books, articles and tapes, I have found the strength of truth, knowledge and valid principles to lift me from the guagmire of injuries, exhaustion and the loss of strength and size. Now I am increasing in strength and size, literally from workout to workout, as I continue my assault on the record books! My personal training clients have also benfited from these same training principles. One of them has gained over 100 pounds of lean in two years and another has gained 30 pounds in just five workouts! To the skeptics, I say - YES! Heavy Duty, high-intensity training principles do work! I have myself, my clients, the methodology and the documentation to prove it!

"Let me propose a question: would you rather go through life believing in something that is not true, or, would you rather have certainty about your training by learning the one valid theory of anaerobic exercise? I hope your choice will be for the truth so you can finally begin the journey of actualizing your maximum muscular potential."

Paul Brodeur, powerlifter and personal trainer in Arlington, Texas 817-737-6837



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summaHIT

Ontario, CAN

Tony Williams wrote:
Paul Brodeur on MikeMentzer.com:

www.mikementzer.com/quotesarchive.html

Scroll down to:

"A Texan with the Strength of Conviction"

"Allow me to introduce myself - I am Paul Brodeur. I squatted 1,000 pounds weighing 318 lbs. with 10 percent bodyfat, making the Powelifting All-Time Top 20 List, while utilizing only high-intensity training principles.

"Through reading and listening to Mike Mentzer's books, articles and tapes, I have found the strength of truth, knowledge and valid principles to lift me from the guagmire of injuries, exhaustion and the loss of strength and size. Now I am increasing in strength and size, literally from workout to workout, as I continue my assault on the record books! My personal training clients have also benfited from these same training principles. One of them has gained over 100 pounds of lean in two years and another has gained 30 pounds in just five workouts! To the skeptics, I say - YES! Heavy Duty, high-intensity training principles do work! I have myself, my clients, the methodology and the documentation to prove it!

"Let me propose a question: would you rather go through life believing in something that is not true, or, would you rather have certainty about your training by learning the one valid theory of anaerobic exercise? I hope your choice will be for the truth so you can finally begin the journey of actualizing your maximum muscular potential."

Paul Brodeur, powerlifter and personal trainer in Arlington, Texas 817-737-6837





This is pure fiction. No one is gaining 30 pounds from 5 workouts.
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Tony Williams

summaHIT wrote:
Tony Williams wrote:
Paul Brodeur on MikeMentzer.com:

www.mikementzer.com/quotesarchive.html

Scroll down to:

"A Texan with the Strength of Conviction"

"Allow me to introduce myself - I am Paul Brodeur. I squatted 1,000 pounds weighing 318 lbs. with 10 percent bodyfat, making the Powelifting All-Time Top 20 List, while utilizing only high-intensity training principles.

"Through reading and listening to Mike Mentzer's books, articles and tapes, I have found the strength of truth, knowledge and valid principles to lift me from the guagmire of injuries, exhaustion and the loss of strength and size. Now I am increasing in strength and size, literally from workout to workout, as I continue my assault on the record books! My personal training clients have also benfited from these same training principles. One of them has gained over 100 pounds of lean in two years and another has gained 30 pounds in just five workouts! To the skeptics, I say - YES! Heavy Duty, high-intensity training principles do work! I have myself, my clients, the methodology and the documentation to prove it!

"Let me propose a question: would you rather go through life believing in something that is not true, or, would you rather have certainty about your training by learning the one valid theory of anaerobic exercise? I hope your choice will be for the truth so you can finally begin the journey of actualizing your maximum muscular potential."

Paul Brodeur, powerlifter and personal trainer in Arlington, Texas 817-737-6837





This is pure fiction. No one is gaining 30 pounds from 5 workouts.


Agreed.

That's absurd.

Tony
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fbcoach

Tony Williams wrote:
summaHIT wrote:
Tony Williams wrote:
Paul Brodeur on MikeMentzer.com:

www.mikementzer.com/quotesarchive.html

Scroll down to:

"A Texan with the Strength of Conviction"

"Allow me to introduce myself - I am Paul Brodeur. I squatted 1,000 pounds weighing 318 lbs. with 10 percent bodyfat, making the Powelifting All-Time Top 20 List, while utilizing only high-intensity training principles.

"Through reading and listening to Mike Mentzer's books, articles and tapes, I have found the strength of truth, knowledge and valid principles to lift me from the guagmire of injuries, exhaustion and the loss of strength and size. Now I am increasing in strength and size, literally from workout to workout, as I continue my assault on the record books! My personal training clients have also benfited from these same training principles. One of them has gained over 100 pounds of lean in two years and another has gained 30 pounds in just five workouts! To the skeptics, I say - YES! Heavy Duty, high-intensity training principles do work! I have myself, my clients, the methodology and the documentation to prove it!

"Let me propose a question: would you rather go through life believing in something that is not true, or, would you rather have certainty about your training by learning the one valid theory of anaerobic exercise? I hope your choice will be for the truth so you can finally begin the journey of actualizing your maximum muscular potential."

Paul Brodeur, powerlifter and personal trainer in Arlington, Texas 817-737-6837





This is pure fiction. No one is gaining 30 pounds from 5 workouts.

Agreed.

That's absurd.

Tony


You seriously have gone off the deepend. You are the one that posted it.
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