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A Big Score in San Diego
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Ellington Darden, Ph.D.

A Big Score in San Diego


The International Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association's (IHRSA) annual trade show was held in San Diego, California, on March 10-14, 2010. Among the 382 companies displaying their new fitness products was X-Force of Stockholm, Sweden.

X-Force manufactures strength-training machines that have tilting weight stacks. By tilting the weight stack to 45 degrees on the positive motion, an X-Force machine supplies a 40-percent heavier negative stroke. With a heavier negative stroke, a trainee now has the power to make a deeper inroad into his starting level of strength . . . which ultimately leads to better results.

With X-Force, a trainee can apply "heavy negatives" under safer conditions and with more consistent control, compared to traditional methods of having spotters help do the lifting and lowering. Now, an advanced trainee, or even a novice – once he or she gets the hang of each machine – has solo control of the all-important negative or eccentric factor.

Last year at IHRSA 2009, attendees were interested and liked X-Force, but no one bought. This year was different.

X-Force took orders in the United States for 49 machines . . . and that does not include four lines of machines that were ordered from a club owner in New Zealand. And, many more machines than the combined totals above have already been sold in Europe. In fact, two European clubs have taken delivery on their equipment and they've reported nothing but outstanding results from their involved members.

So, X-Force scored BIG in San Diego and the future is THUMBS-UP.

X-Force will be displaying all their machines at FIBO, which will take place again this year in Essen, Germany, April 22-25, 2010. I'll be attending the trade show and will post a report about it on this website.

In the meantime, below is a roundup of photos from IHRSA 2010.

This photo was taken minutes before the X-Force display was opened for IHRSA attendees on March 11, 2010. The display contained 29 X-Force machines.

Luke Carlson performs an intense set on the X-Force Leg Press. Luke owns Discover Strength Personal Fitness Center in Plymouth, MN.

Left table: Big Jim Flanagan, a longtime strength-training professional, talks with Debbie Lee of the Gainesville Health & Fitness Center. Behind them: Joe Cirulli, Owner of the Gainesville Health & Fitness Center, discusses business with Jim Teatum of Sportwall International. Right table: Mats Thulin (seated), CEO of X-Force, examines a floor plan for two interested buyers, as Dr. Bjorn Alber, of X-Force, smiles his approval.

Note: The Gainesville Health & Fitness Center in Gainesville, FL, will be getting a complete line of 14 X-Force machines in June of 2010. I'll be conducting six months of eccentric training with more than 100 research subjects at Cirulli's club.

Bjorn Alber, a sportsmedicine physician for X-Force, urges an athlete to get one more rep on the Pec Seated Press.

Standing right: Roger Schwab, President of the Mainline Health & Fitness Center in Bryn Mawr, PA, shares an adventure with Alexander Hook, an exercise physiologist for X-Force. Schwab's Mainline club will soon have a line of X-Force machines.

David Landau of Advanced Exercise in Miami, FL, hits the X-Force Deltoid Lift with serious focus.

Another shot of David Landau, who is a frequent contributor to the discussion forum, showing precision form on the X-Force Pec Arm Cross.

Niclas Orrje, X-Force's legal advisor, offers his assistance to a trainee on the leg press. The ergonomically designed footplate removes much of the tension on the knees that normally occurs during this exercise.

Using 140 pounds on the X-Force Pec Angled Press is difficult for most women to perform, but Terri Gutierrez handles it with ease. I trained Terri during the early 1980s at the Nautilus Research Center in Lake Helen, FL.

The X-Force Lat Back Pull provides easy-grip rotating handles for supination, pronation, or neutral positioning of the hands.

Bruce Pechman of Solana Beach, CA, helped pump his arms by using the X-Force Biceps and Triceps machines. Not bad for a guy who's 54-years old.

Ellington Darden discusses X-Force with Anna Anka. In 1993, Anna was Miss Hawaiian Tropic of Sweden.

Discuss this article | Text Version

Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Is there a price list available for the US market yet? Also has anyone out there used the pullover yet? Im told they took out the elbow pads which is the idea behind the original in the first place. However Bio has stated that is makes more sense this way if you are looking at it from a kinetic chain point of view.

Michael
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Ellington Darden

Michael,

The X-Force Pullover, indeed, is without elbow pads. When I tried it I was a bit skeptical. But believe me, it works very well that way. You certainly feel it in your lats, especially when you pause in the contracted position and depress your shoulders. Then, release and perform a slow negative.

I have a price list in front of me. It's in Euros, so you'll have to get the daily value and multiply. The average cost of each of 14 X-Force machines is $6,740.70, and again, that's in Euros.

Ellington
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

El,

Glad to see such initial acceptance.

Also in some of the pics you look like your bulking up again.

You been training heavy recently?

You know I like to see that for us geezers. :^)

Also that price you quoted Michael can't be the landed price. (can it?) If so that is a steal. In 2010 dollars they might be cheaper than Nautilus of the 80's. Seems like some of those were close to or over $4k
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Ellington Darden

BIO-FORCE wrote:
El,

Glad to see such initial acceptance.

Also in some of the pics you look like your bulking up again.

You been training heavy recently?

You know I like to see that for us geezers. :^)

Also that price you quoted Michael can't be the landed price. (can it?) If so that is a steal. In 2010 dollars they might be cheaper than Nautilus of the 80's. Seems like some of those were close to or over $4k


Hi John,

My body weight has been around 180 pounds for the last several years.

Landed price? That would probably be the average price above, plus a containerization cost of 700 Euros. I'm not sure if this containerization cost is tacked on to each machine, or the entire group of machines?

Ellington

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overfiftylifter

If I understand correctly, each machine averages about $8,993.69 before shipping costs?

0'50
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Ellington Darden

overfiftylifter wrote:
If I understand correctly, each machine averages about $8,993.69 before shipping costs?

0'50


Yes, I believe that's correct.

Ellington

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Orly

With the way technology is advancing, maybe free weights will be replaced in the near future.

What do you think Darden?
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Ellington Darden

Free weights will always be around.

Ellington
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SpencerG

Thank you for this update. I am fascinated by these machines. As a kid at the Naval Academy we spent a lot of time doing "negatives" because the coaches thought we developed more strength more quickly that way.
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SteveHIT

Ellington Darden wrote:
Free weights will always be around.

Ellington


Agreed!
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AI1963

Great report. Looking forward to the word from FIBO.
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marcrph

Portugal

Dr. Darden,

I would like to commend you for your personal dress and grooming!

Marc

P.S. Does X-FORCE have a neck machine?
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Ellington Darden

X-Force does not have a neck machine yet. But it's on the drawing board.

Ellington
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Dan_The_man

I would probably go as far to say that these machines are probably the best any exercise machines will ever get, I don't see how they can get any better now. Unless you put your muscles into a machine that somehow forces them to grow without you having to workout. I think these machines will certainly help the commercial business of gyms and those that have the money to afford their own personal gymnasiums but even considering all of this I am rather skeptical.

To me its kind of like owning a car, if you drive something that's old and rusty, it might not be the most comfortable to drive, and it might take you a little longer to get to your end point, and you might have a lot more waste from the exhaust, than if you had a top of the range modern road car, but you'll always find an old car just as capable as getting to the same ends as the newer car even if it is less efficient.

Although many on this website view the barbell as a piece of antiquated piece of equipment - I believe it to be timeless. Now I am not going to say a barbell is better than a machine, certainly not, but a machine is by no means a quantum leap from a barbell. And people that hold machines as revoltionary are wrong, because a machine is basically a barbell tailored towards a certain muscle group, and anything is only as good as the results it produces. Cause and effect.

I still believe most bodybuilders and physical enthusiasts are looking for that secret, and I think thats why the business is so big, but the more I read on the subject, the more I am actually re-reading something I have read before.


Dan

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southbeach

Ellington Darden wrote:
X-Force does not have a neck machine yet. But it's on the drawing board.

Ellington


Do you know the reasoning behind the lack of elbow pads to push against with the pullover machine?

This doesn't make sense to me..pushing with elbows as opposed to pulling with the hands better isolates the target lats.

This is easy to demonstrate..i always maintain OPEN hands on the "crossbar" and push with only the elbows on a conventional pullover machine. this keeps the elbows on the pads.

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minorkey

Ohio, USA

Ell,
I'm sorry to interrupt everyone, but I'm trying to find out if the New Bodybuilding for Old School Results is still in print or what. I tried sending you a message a few weeks ago. When I attempt to purchase it online some type of message comes up warning of the legitimacy of the website..?? Also, just for curiosity I checked the price and availability on Amazon.com... It was listed only used, for like 84.95!?!?... Can anybody help me out on this issue? I'm dying to get a hold of it..
Thanks.
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Ellington Darden

minorkey,

Just push "continue" and everything should work. Or call 1-800-525-1940 and order by phone. The book is still available. If it is being sold on Amazon, someone is re-selling a copy that he probably ordered from this website.

Ellington
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Ellington Darden

southbeach,

Yeah, I know what you're saying. It didn't make sense to me either . . . until I tried it. But it definitely works. At least, it "feels" like it works. I'll have to give the entire situation some thought to figure out exactly why.

X-Force has told me, however, that their pullover will be sold with, or without, elbow pads.

Ellington
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dhitquinn

Awesome day by the looks of things and some pretty hot women there to.
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DSears

I have a question on the leg press. It looks like the foot plate is free to swivel up to a point. Is that correct? If so, does that take some time to get used to?

Thanks,

David
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Ellington Darden

DSears wrote:
I have a question on the leg press. It looks like the foot plate is free to swivel up to a point. Is that correct? If so, does that take some time to get used to?

Thanks,

David


David,

Yes, the foot plate swivels. It felt somewhat unstable to me the first time I tried it. But after 2-3 sessions, my feet, knees, and hips had adjusted and it was no problem at all.

On the positive side, I felt a reduction of stress on my knees from the X-Force Leg Press, as compared to the Nautilus Nitro Leg Press.

Ellington
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theHITman

Dr Darden,

Your comments about the Leg Press bring up an interesting aside.

Do you think you'll be replacing any of the Nautilus machines in your home gym with X-force machines? And if so, which ones?
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Ellington Darden

theHITman wrote:
Dr Darden,

Your comments about the Leg Press bring up an interesting aside.

Do you think you'll be replacing any of the Nautilus machines in your home gym with X-force machines? And if so, which ones?


Yeah, I was thinking seriously about doing this, say in January of 2011. I'd like to have the X-Force Chest Press, Leg Curl, Leg Press, Pullover, and Rowing . . . and get rid of my Nautilus ones of the same kind.

Ellington

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marcrph

Portugal

The overhead press looks like it belongs in the Duke Blue Devils weight room........A Clear Winner!

This machine would appear to limit any chance of shoulder impingement syndrome. I like this machine!

Mr. Landau is put through the paces.

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=hxkexz0cnv8
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