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Leg Press = Indirect Effect?
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Tony Williams

Do leg presses, in your opinion, offer the same indirect or systemic effect to the body as many suggest squats and deadlifts do?

Put another way ... are leg presses mass builders the way squats and deadlifts seem to be?

Why ... or why not?

Regards,
Tony
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jn6047

In my opinion:

They are effective for building the quads, hamstrings, glutes, and hip flexors depending on form. They do not have the same effect on the body as squats or leg presses due to the support the leg press provides. It can be a good or a bad things depending on your goals and your training philosophies.

jn6047
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Tony Williams

jn6047 wrote:
In my opinion:

They are effective for building the quads, hamstrings, glutes, and hip flexors depending on form. They do not have the same effect on the body as squats or leg presses due to the support the leg press provides. It can be a good or a bad things depending on your goals and your training philosophies.

jn6047


The support? Not sure I understand.

Do you mean the platform?

Tony

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theTummy

Michigan, USA

I've had back issues in the past, and I admit that sometimes I'm just plain scared to push myself on squats. It is unfortunate because I believe that squats are one of the most effective exercises. When I was a young man, I got big pretty fast by doing heavy squats.
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Mr. Strong

Tony Williams wrote:
Do leg presses, in your opinion, offer the same indirect or systemic effect to the body as many suggest squats and deadlifts do?

Put another way ... are leg presses mass builders the way squats and deadlifts seem to be?

Why ... or why not?

Regards,
Tony





Leg presses can't be compared to the Squat and Deadlift, the Squat and Deadlift are in a different league.
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davise

Similar analogy. Switched to hip belt squats from barbell squats some time ago for safety and longevity purposes. Awesome at working my lower half (minus lower back). I would argue works it harder than bb squats directly targetting quads. What I notice though is the indirect effect to my body is nowhere near as great. WIth squats, my upperback, shoulders, lower back etc got a good workout as well.

Leg press is similar to hip belt squats in that aspect. It more directly targets the lower half without the upper body or whole body ie indirect effect. Squats supposedly release more growth hormone than other exercises...I don't know.

Some do not believe in the indirect effect on this board, so you'll probably get pages of bickering back and forth.
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krazy kaju

Didn't AJ come out against the indirect effect later in life?
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HeavyHitter32

Squats do give more of an overall effect since the weight is on the shoulders causing more upper body and back involvement. However, a good leg press will probably hit the lower body better as you can take out the lower back weak link and strain...especially if you are taller.

The deadlift can be a very good overall movement, but less effective than squats or leg presses for the thighs based on my experience.
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Zabo

krazy kaju wrote:
Didn't AJ come out against the indirect effect later in life?


Certainly did not.With squats and deadlifts and especially deadlifts the body as a hole is more involved in lifting the weight.Whereas with leg presses only your legs are working.But there still is indirect effect.Deadlift is such a huge exercise that in my opinion should not be performed more than once a month.The fatigue after deadlift is greater than after squats.I would say 20-30% more.
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Mr. Strong

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Squats do give more of an overall effect since the weight is on the shoulders causing more upper body and back involvement. However, a good leg press will probably hit the lower body better as you can take out the lower back weak link and strain...especially if you are taller.

The deadlift can be a very good overall movement, but less effective than squats or leg presses for the thighs based on my experience.




The back isn't a weak link, but if you train leg press your lower back will be far weaker than when you train squats.
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db144

Always funny to watch the leg press only guys give a shot at the squat. The look on their face when they realize how little weight they can squat after doing large numbers in the leg press is priceless.

d
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larsvonthreat

Anything that works the largest musculatures and create a great oxygen debt will have a systemic effect.With a screwed lower back I can say a good leg press is the best "safe" exercise you can do for indirect effect.

You can work the lowerbody to "true" failure with a leg press.something impossible with squats because the lower back fails before and it become hazardous to continue after lower back fatigue.
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southbeach

Mr. Strong wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Squats do give more of an overall effect since the weight is on the shoulders causing more upper body and back involvement. However, a good leg press will probably hit the lower body better as you can take out the lower back weak link and strain...especially if you are taller.

The deadlift can be a very good overall movement, but less effective than squats or leg presses for the thighs based on my experience.



The back isn't a weak link, but if you train leg press your lower back will be far weaker than when you train squats.


prove it!
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strengthmaster

Michigan, USA

If you want a machine that carries the same effect and in-direct effect that squats do, then check out the Rogers Pendulum Power Squat Pro. You are not "supported" as you are in other squat machines. It is also a little easier on the lower back because the design allows you to maintain a more upright torso, similar to what the trap
bar does in the deadlift movement. I also believe that higher reps (15-30)in
the squat/deadlift movement stimulates that in-direct effect even more.

Scott
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marcrph

Portugal

db144 wrote:
Always funny to watch the leg press only guys give a shot at the squat. The look on their face when they realize how little weight they can squat after doing large numbers in the leg press is priceless.

d


Funny, I've never had the problem you related, but I do like to dead lift every so often.

A heavy set of SS leg presses taken to failure will leave you heaving for breaths like "nothing" else, other than all out sprinting.

The facts are that even with safety racks, it is almost impossible to train to failure with squats. You will "learn" to stop short of failure or get injured. Leg presses, on the other hand, can be learned to be taken to failure. Secondly, the squat has compression issues that one must additionally recover from. The leg press does not have these same issues.

The squat takes more time to learn, the leg press does not. Saying that, I think high rep squats can be very beneficial, along with high rep dead lifts. Ideally, all 3 lifts could be rotated, albeit somewhat sparingly in my case.
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marcrph

Portugal

Mr. Strong wrote:
The back isn't a weak link, but if you train leg press your lower back will be far weaker than when you train squats.


Dan Riley stated in Dr. Darden's latest book, that squats are NOT even necessary IF you play NFL football. So much for a "weak" back issue, or rather non-issue.
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Mr. Strong

larsvonthreat wrote:
Anything that works the largest musculatures and create a great oxygen debt will have a systemic effect.With a screwed lower back I can say a good leg press is the best "safe" exercise you can do for indirect effect.

You can work the lowerbody to "true" failure with a leg press.something impossible with squats because the lower back fails before and it become hazardous to continue after lower back fatigue.




If the lower back actually failed you would not be able to remain upright with any kind of control, and would certainly not be able to re-rack the bar. The lower back does not fail first, if it did you would stll be able to extend the legs.
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Mr. Strong

southbeach wrote:
Mr. Strong wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Squats do give more of an overall effect since the weight is on the shoulders causing more upper body and back involvement. However, a good leg press will probably hit the lower body better as you can take out the lower back weak link and strain...especially if you are taller.

The deadlift can be a very good overall movement, but less effective than squats or leg presses for the thighs based on my experience.



The back isn't a weak link, but if you train leg press your lower back will be far weaker than when you train squats.

prove it!



Do a set of squats to failure, what happens at the end?
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marcrph

Portugal

strengthmaster wrote:
If you want a machine that carries the same effect and in-direct effect that squats do, then check out the Rogers Pendulum Power Squat Pro. You are not "supported" as you are in other squat machines. It is also a little easier on the lower back because the design allows you to maintain a more upright torso, similar to what the trap
bar does in the deadlift movement. I also believe that higher reps (15-30)in
the squat/deadlift movement stimulates that in-direct effect even more.

Scott


Scott,

I tried this machine, and felt awkward while doing reps.....perhaps it was just me. I started to buy this machine.....but I'm waiting still.....have to be very....very....good...to beat my Nautilus leverage leg press.

Marc

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Mr. Strong

marcrph wrote:
Mr. Strong wrote:
The back isn't a weak link, but if you train leg press your lower back will be far weaker than when you train squats.

Dan Riley stated in Dr. Darden's latest book, that squats are NOT even necessary IF you play NFL football. So much for a "weak" back issue, or rather non-issue.




That must mean your right then, lol.
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HeavyHitter32

Mr. Strong wrote:

The back isn't a weak link, but if you train leg press your lower back will be far weaker than when you train squats.


Oh my. Not again with you.
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southbeach

Mr. Strong wrote:
southbeach wrote:
Mr. Strong wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Squats do give more of an overall effect since the weight is on the shoulders causing more upper body and back involvement. However, a good leg press will probably hit the lower body better as you can take out the lower back weak link and strain...especially if you are taller.

The deadlift can be a very good overall movement, but less effective than squats or leg presses for the thighs based on my experience.



The back isn't a weak link, but if you train leg press your lower back will be far weaker than when you train squats.

prove it!


Do a set of squats to failure, what happens at the end?


i'm bent forward much further at the waist then when i started and i crash to the pins below.

what does this tell you?
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marcrph

Portugal

The Leg Press
Part One - Jan Dellinger

Comparing Metabolic Effects

"The effect on the cardio-respiratory system is an indicator of the value of an exercise. In my case, I noted that heavy, all-out sets of leg presses (especially those for reps of 8-20) got me significantly more breathless and rubber-legged than squats under the same conditions. Of course, dead-lifts for high reps was the ultimate self-torture with a barbell.

Proponents of the squat rave on about its metabolic activation properties, and how this triggers growth. If I reach a higher state of stimulation with the leg press (or dead-lift) doesn't this render the alternate exercises to squats better for me? The metabolic activation is what's supposed to trigger the body's gaining mechanism. The point is what gets the job done more efficiently.

Due to unfavorable leverage (and, later on, injury) I could never reach the poundage in the squat to match the higher level of stimulation reached with the leg press or dead-lift. Which exercise, then, should I focus on most of the time? What's wrong with propitious individualism."
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HDROB

Tony Williams wrote:
Do leg presses, in your opinion, offer the same indirect or systemic effect to the body as many suggest squats and deadlifts do?

Put another way ... are leg presses mass builders the way squats and deadlifts seem to be?

Why ... or why not?

Regards,
Tony


Tony, I'm scratching my brains thinking where I read of a leg-press only workout for the whole body: one set. Sounds crazy, I know. John Little was in discussion with someone about it, to name drop. The indirect effect was the crux of the conversation. I must investigate.
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marcrph

Portugal

HDROB wrote:
Tony Williams wrote:
Do leg presses, in your opinion, offer the same indirect or systemic effect to the body as many suggest squats and deadlifts do?

Put another way ... are leg presses mass builders the way squats and deadlifts seem to be?

Why ... or why not?

Regards,
Tony

Tony, I'm scratching my brains thinking where I read of a leg-press only workout for the whole body: one set. Sounds crazy, I know. John Little was in discussion with someone about it, to name drop. The indirect effect was the crux of the conversation. I must investigate.


http://www.drdarden.com/...510812&pageNo=3
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