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marcrph

North Carolina, USA

http://www.ebay.com/...=item484228860e

Bowflex gone wild!

Deadlift that!

Bench that!
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Nautilus1975

It was a tragic bowflex 'accident' .......
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marcrph

North Carolina, USA

I too wonder about the safety of such mods
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HeavyHitter32

Stay away from the Bowflex.
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kulitsa

New York, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Stay away from the Bowflex.


X2
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Tony Williams

Makes me wonder what the oldtimers such as Grimek, Reeves, Park, etc., would think of the Bowflex.

My barber has an expensive model of the Bowflex on the second story of his home.

Oh, I forgot to mention. Its primary purpose for the last few years has been ... an expensive clothes hanger.

Tony
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marcrph

North Carolina, USA

Bowflex squats look intriguing

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=N422ekOKtCU

I'd like to try Bowflex deadlifts
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marcrph

North Carolina, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Stay away from the Bowflex.


Is this how you feel about exercise machines in general?
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Ellington Darden

Guys,

I've said this before, but it's worth repeating. I have a Bowflex machine in my private gym and I use it almost every day with my trainees. The machine itself is more than 10 years old.

Ellington
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marcrph

North Carolina, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
Guys,

I've said this before, but it's worth repeating. I have a Bowflex machine in my private gym and I use it almost every day with my trainees. The machine itself is more than 10 years old.

Ellington



Funny,

I just got one also,

I like it quite a bit so far.
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marcrph

North Carolina, USA

Has anyone every used this power rods tension increasing device?

http://www.ebay.com/...47&cmd=ViewItem
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RW Hawk

Virgin Islands

If you know how to achieve DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD, it can be done with just about any equipment, including the Bowflex.
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HeavyHitter32

marcrph wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Stay away from the Bowflex.

Is this how you feel about exercise machines in general?


Not at all. After 15 years of training with free weights and decent machines (Hammer Strength, etc.) I bought a Bowflex and started training at home. I used it exclusively for several years and lost some lean body mass. This was especially noticeable in my legs. To be honest, I enjoyed using it. It's kind of "cool" to use and has a unique feel to it. However, there is something about the rod resistance when used exclusively that is not optimal for size and strength.

Last year I sold the Bowflex and bought the Powertec Multi-station and New York Barbell Leg press along with free weights. All is well again. :)
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HeavyHitter32

DeadTrap. wrote:
If you know how to achieve DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD, it can be done with just about any equipment, including the Bowflex.


Bullshit.
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marcrph

North Carolina, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
marcrph wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Stay away from the Bowflex.

Is this how you feel about exercise machines in general?

Not at all. After 15 years of training with free weights and decent machines (Hammer Strength, etc.) I bought a Bowflex and started training at home. I used it exclusively for several years and lost some lean body mass. This was especially noticeable in my legs. To be honest, I enjoyed using it. It's kind of "cool" to use and has a unique feel to it. However, there is something about the rod resistance when used exclusively that is not optimal for size and strength.

Last year I sold the Bowflex and bought the Powertec Multi-station and New York Barbell Leg press along with free weights. All is well again. :)


I too have a Powertec lat machine tower....1st rate piece of equipment.

I think heavy resistance from the Bowflex would be optimal if used against the force of gravity...ie.....as in squats and deadlifts, which unfortunately are never emphasized on the Bowflex....too much bodybuilding association for the company.
I think the Bowflex has a different "feel," ie stabilization effect....if so...I don't know how much this affects strength development.
The bench press on the Bowflex...how much transfer to a regular barbell bench press....who knows.

Food for thought.

But the Bowflex has the potential to replace several pieces of equipment in the gym. Dr. Darden was on to something that bends(pun intended) nicely.
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summaHIT

Ontario, CAN

Guys,
I have never used a Bowflex so I don't really have an opinion.
What I would like some clarity on is what I am seeing on kijij for used equipment.

I bought a massive Body-Solid leverage gym for $500. I bought a used Cybex leg press for $200 (retail $5000). And in preparation for an operation I bought a pulley system gym with a 200lb weight stack that has 5 different pulleys, not counting the leg ext/curl, for $400.

These purchases were all amazing deals for great equipment. The used bowflexes on the other hand seem to always be priced over $1000 and many over $2000. Are these machines so much new that these seemingly high prices are good deals or do they just not depreciate as much?
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fbcoach

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
DeadTrap. wrote:
If you know how to achieve DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD, it can be done with just about any equipment, including the Bowflex.

Bullshit.


The term "inroad" is vague. It appears to be more of a marketing term than any description in exercise physiology. If it is meant to mean fatigue, is it muscular fatigue, CNS fatigue, PNS fatigue, etc.? Is it depletion of energy substrates, stimulation of muscle fibers, tension, etc.? If so, there are already names for the terms and processes and very specific. I agree. It sounds like BS. Just look at the kook that knows how to do it:)
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HeavyHitter32

marcrph wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
marcrph wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Stay away from the Bowflex.

Is this how you feel about exercise machines in general?

Not at all. After 15 years of training with free weights and decent machines (Hammer Strength, etc.) I bought a Bowflex and started training at home. I used it exclusively for several years and lost some lean body mass. This was especially noticeable in my legs. To be honest, I enjoyed using it. It's kind of "cool" to use and has a unique feel to it. However, there is something about the rod resistance when used exclusively that is not optimal for size and strength.

Last year I sold the Bowflex and bought the Powertec Multi-station and New York Barbell Leg press along with free weights. All is well again. :)

I too have a Powertec lat machine tower....1st rate piece of equipment.

I think heavy resistance from the Bowflex would be optimal if used against the force of gravity...ie.....as in squats and deadlifts, which unfortunately are never emphasized on the Bowflex....too much bodybuilding association for the company.
I think the Bowflex has a different "feel," ie stabilization effect....if so...I don't know how much this affects strength development.
The bench press on the Bowflex...how much transfer to a regular barbell bench press....who knows.

Food for thought.

But the Bowflex has the potential to replace several pieces of equipment in the gym. Dr. Darden was on to something that bends(pun intended) nicely.


I don't believe the negative is heavy enough on the Bowflex. Something about it doesn't seem right. In addition, there is too little resistance in the starting position of movements, yet too much in the so-called "contracted" positions.
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HeavyHitter32

fbcoach wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
DeadTrap. wrote:
If you know how to achieve DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD, it can be done with just about any equipment, including the Bowflex.

Bullshit.

The term "inroad" is vague. It appears to be more of a marketing term than any description in exercise physiology. If it is meant to mean fatigue, is it muscular fatigue, CNS fatigue, PNS fatigue, etc.? Is it depletion of energy substrates, stimulation of muscle fibers, tension, etc.? If so, there are already names for the terms and processes and very specific. I agree. It sounds like BS. Just look at the kook that knows how to do it:)


Agreed - I have never seen the vague term "inroad" in any physiology textbook. I've been asking for years for someone to show me which textbook contains the term. I'm still waiting.
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marcrph

North Carolina, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
fbcoach wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
DeadTrap. wrote:
If you know how to achieve DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD, it can be done with just about any equipment, including the Bowflex.

Bullshit.

The term "inroad" is vague. It appears to be more of a marketing term than any description in exercise physiology. If it is meant to mean fatigue, is it muscular fatigue, CNS fatigue, PNS fatigue, etc.? Is it depletion of energy substrates, stimulation of muscle fibers, tension, etc.? If so, there are already names for the terms and processes and very specific. I agree. It sounds like BS. Just look at the kook that knows how to do it:)

Agreed - I have never seen the vague term "inroad" in any physiology textbook. I've been asking for years for someone to show me which textbook contains the term. I'm still waiting.


ask the Superslow crowd....it is the basis of their training
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
I don't believe the negative is heavy enough on the Bowflex. Something about it doesn't seem right. In addition, there is too little resistance in the starting position of movements, yet too much in the so-called "contracted" positions.


I think Bowflex may have been the impetus, to some extent, behind J-Reps.
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marcrph

North Carolina, USA

simon-hecubus wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
I don't believe the negative is heavy enough on the Bowflex. Something about it doesn't seem right. In addition, there is too little resistance in the starting position of movements, yet too much in the so-called "contracted" positions.

I think Bowflex may have been the impetus, to some extent, behind J-Reps.


That is a novel thought. Mr. Johnston used to contribute here greatly. I still wished he did.
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marcrph

North Carolina, USA

Brian Johnston & Dr. Darden commenting on the Bowflex.

http://www.drdarden.com/...ic.do?id=384075
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RW Hawk

Virgin Islands

marcrph wrote:
I too wonder about the safety of such mods


Unnecessary and yeah, probably not safe.

I've had the Ultimate model before.

If you learn how to achieve DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD, you won't even need the resistance upgrade for the rods.

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marcrph

North Carolina, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
I don't believe the negative is heavy enough on the Bowflex. Something about it doesn't seem right. In addition, there is too little resistance in the starting position of movements, yet too much in the so-called "contracted" positions.


For the deadlift....the eccentric portion is not always wise to emphasize.
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