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Conjugate Method
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krazy kaju

I'm sure many of you are familiar with the so-called "conjugate method," also known as non-linear periodization. If not, then I suggest you google those terms. Here are some short definitions:

Periodization is organizing training by cycling different training variables, i.e. load, frequency, volume, and intensity.

Linear Periodization is organizing training around blocks of time, e.g. for 6 weeks you might train with heavy load, the following 6 weeks you might train with high volume, and the last 6 weeks you might train with high intensity. An obvious example of this is the "classic" method consisting of different phases: hypertrophy, strength, power, and restorative. A less obvious example is DC Training, which alternates between 6-8 week "blasts" (when you lift with maximal intensity) and 1-2 week "cruises" (when you lift short of failure in order to maximize recovery).

Non-linear Periodization, also known as the conjugate method, consists of varying these training variables within one "microcycle," i.e. varying these training variables over the course of a few days or a week, not over the course of many weeks. An obvious example is the way the powerlifters of Westside Barbell train (google "Westside template"). A less obvious example could be the way Arthur Jones and Dr. Darden proposed alternating single set to-failure (SSTF) workouts with not-to-failure (NTF) workouts...

What I want to propose is using not-to-failure (NTF) workouts in a more frequent and consistent manner. Though Arthur Jones and now Dr. Darden advocate the use of NTF workouts, it seems like most proponents of HIT suffer from a sort of tunnel-vision and have totally forgotten about the merits of NTF training.

As we know, SSTF workouts are best for stimulating the fast-twitch fibers most capable of growth in a safe and efficient manner. However, those fast-twitch fibers are slow to recover, while slow-twitch fibers are quick to recover. My hypothesis is that waiting for your fast-twitch fibers to recover/overcompensate can take long enough for your slow-twitch fibers to begin to atrophy. Thus, it would make sense to alternate SSTF workouts that target fast-twitch fibers with NTF workouts that target the slow-twitch fibers.

A classic example of the above would be the standard Jones/Darden recommendation of training SSTF on Mondays and Fridays, while training NTF on Wednesdays. This standard Jones/Darden conjugate template looks like this:

Day 1 - SSTF
Day 2 - rest
Day 3 - NTF
Day 4 - rest
Day 5 - SSTF
Day 6 - rest
Day 7 - rest

There are other ways of utilizing NTF workouts, though. For example, you could workout every-other-day (EOD), while alternating SSTF with NTF workouts:

Day 1 - SSTF
Day 2 - rest
Day 3 - NTF
Day 4 - rest
Day 5 - SSTF
Day 6 - rest
Day 7 - NTF
Day 8 - rest

The above would have you working to failure every four days.

OR you could utilize SSTF-training on Monday-Friday-Wednesday while filling in the extra rest days with NTF training, like this:

Day 1 - SSTF
Day 2 - rest
Day 3 - NTF
Day 4 - rest
Day 5 - SSTF
Day 6 - rest
Day 7 - rest
Day 8 - NTF
Day 9 - rest
Day 10 - SSTF
Day 11 - rest
Day 12 - NTF
Day 13 - rest
Day 14 - rest

The above would have you working to failure every 4-5 days.

OR you could utilize a split routine using this conjugate method for HIT:
Day 1 - SSTF Upper Body
Day 2 - rest
Day 3 - NTF Lower Body
Day 4 - rest
Day 5 - SSTF Lower Body
Day 6 - rest
Day 7 - NTF Upper Body
Day 8 - rest

There are, of course, many more ways of doing this. My point in posting this thread is to be creative. Many of us seem to forget about the NTF workouts that Jones and Dr. Darden advocated. It's worth experimenting to see if they can help our physical development.
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Turpin

Cyclical resistance ( resistance being my way of regulating intensity ) has always been a mainstay of my training.

I tried SSTF training over some 8 weeks and was simply burnt out as a result.

I resumed cyclical training and my recovery ( & strength ) began to take a turn for the up once more.

T.
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RW Hawk

Virgin Islands

Turpin wrote:
I tried SSTF training over some 8 weeks and was simply burnt out as a result.


That would be the result of a lot of harsh muscular loading and little resulting INROAD.

This "burnt out" feeling can be eliminated if you reduce the load and focus on DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD.
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kulitsa

New York, USA

I have tried Darden's routines on a basis of 3 times a week SSTF-NTF-SSTF. This worked ok. I think it would work even better if it was done as NTF-NTF-SSTF, SSTF being a workout on Friday that allows much more rest over the weekend as opposed to weekdays.

The only problem I have with this is that I do not feel that one set of an exercise is enough to work a muscle through thoroughly. Plus doing too many compounds in one day, even if they are done in NTF fashion, will totally burn a person out. Imagine doing squat, deadlift, bench press, chin up and dip in one workout even NTF. That would be too much.

Another way would be to do isolation exercises and machines. I never had much luck with machines though.
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Turpin

DeadTrap. wrote:
Turpin wrote:
I tried SSTF training over some 8 weeks and was simply burnt out as a result.

That would be the result of a lot of harsh muscular loading and little resulting INROAD.

This "burnt out" feeling can be eliminated if you reduce the load and focus on DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD.


Really ? .... Id say it was the result of CNS fatigue from training to failure !

I used to experience similar when nearing the end of a competition cycle where the resistance & subsequent intensity was highest ( & likewise the effect on the CNS was too )

Such high effort cannot be sustained every workout lest progress grinds to a halt and regression is inevitable.

T.
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summaHIT

Ontario, CAN

Turpin wrote:
Cyclical resistance ( resistance being my way of regulating intensity ) has always been a mainstay of my training.

I tried SSTF training over some 8 weeks and was simply burnt out as a result.

I resumed cyclical training and my recovery ( & strength ) began to take a turn for the up once more.

T.


SSTF = long recovery time + less workouts + less strength + less muscle

I think the conjugate method is the way to go but would not do it as Krazy is proposing. Adding a SS NTF workout just seems more pointless than SSTF.

I like the idea of trying to train more and doing different workouts every workout. I think that is the point of the conjugate method. The varied workouts allow you to train again sooner since you are working a different aspect each time.

I would do something like this:

Monday- 8-10 sets x 2-3 reps, Trap Bar Dead, Shoulder Press, Pull Down, Close Grip Bench.

Wednesday- 4 sets of 6, Leg Press, Decline Bench, Row, Lateral Raise.

Friday- 2-3 sets of 12, Stiff legged Deadlift, Calf raise, Low Incline db Press, Traps, Cable reverse fly.

I would most likely take 2 days between workouts but this is just an example.
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summaHIT

Ontario, CAN

DeadTrap. wrote:
Turpin wrote:
I tried SSTF training over some 8 weeks and was simply burnt out as a result.

That would be the result of a lot of harsh muscular loading and little resulting INROAD.

This "burnt out" feeling can be eliminated if you reduce the load and focus on DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD.


You are really funny.
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crazeeJZ

KK,

The question is, is that middle workout in the non-split routine necessary? Based on muscle fiber characteristics, we can theorize that it is necessary or optimal, but many have found it doesn't make a difference.

As far as failure, it can be too much. Pushing yourself to improve is what's necessary, not pushing yourself to the limit. Pushing yourself to the limit every time just makes you hit that wall much faster.

Now, if we just push ourselves to improve from last workout, we can maintain a higher workout frequency, which strikes a better balance between different muscle fiber recoveries. They become a non-issue.
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marcrph

Spain

krazy kaju wrote:
As we know, SSTF workouts are best for stimulating the fast-twitch fibers most capable of growth in a safe and efficient manner.


This is blatantly not true.


However, those fast-twitch fibers are slow to recover, while slow-twitch fibers are quick to recover.


Non-failure set of greater than 85% maximum weight can be recovered from nicely....as many empirical examples abound.

My hypothesis is that waiting for your fast-twitch fibers to recover/overcompensate can take long enough for your slow-twitch fibers to begin to atrophy. Thus, it would make sense to alternate SSTF workouts that target fast-twitch fibers with NTF workouts that target the slow-twitch fibers.


You simply are not well grounded in muscle physiology. Study more....and not just HIT literature.

A classic example of the above would be the standard Jones/Darden recommendation of training SSTF on Mondays and Fridays, while training NTF on Wednesdays. This standard Jones/Darden conjugate template looks like this:

Day 1 - SSTF
Day 2 - rest
Day 3 - NTF
Day 4 - rest
Day 5 - SSTF
Day 6 - rest
Day 7 - rest

There are other ways of utilizing NTF workouts, though. For example, you could workout every-other-day (EOD), while alternating SSTF with NTF workouts:

Day 1 - SSTF
Day 2 - rest
Day 3 - NTF
Day 4 - rest
Day 5 - SSTF
Day 6 - rest
Day 7 - NTF
Day 8 - rest

The above would have you working to failure every four days.

OR you could utilize SSTF-training on Monday-Friday-Wednesday while filling in the extra rest days with NTF training, like this:

Day 1 - SSTF
Day 2 - rest
Day 3 - NTF
Day 4 - rest
Day 5 - SSTF
Day 6 - rest
Day 7 - rest
Day 8 - NTF
Day 9 - rest
Day 10 - SSTF
Day 11 - rest
Day 12 - NTF
Day 13 - rest
Day 14 - rest

The above would have you working to failure every 4-5 days.

OR you could utilize a split routine using this conjugate method for HIT:
Day 1 - SSTF Upper Body
Day 2 - rest
Day 3 - NTF Lower Body
Day 4 - rest
Day 5 - SSTF Lower Body
Day 6 - rest
Day 7 - NTF Upper Body
Day 8 - rest

There are, of course, many more ways of doing this. My point in posting this thread is to be creative. Many of us seem to forget about the NTF workouts that Jones and Dr. Darden advocated. It's worth experimenting to see if they can help our physical development.


Just train NTF every day...and...forget failure workouts, as they offer no advantages for strength training.
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fbcoach

DeadTrap. wrote:
Turpin wrote:
I tried SSTF training over some 8 weeks and was simply burnt out as a result.

That would be the result of a lot of harsh muscular loading and little resulting INROAD.

This "burnt out" feeling can be eliminated if you reduce the load and focus on DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD.


INROAD is just a made-up marketing term, similar to your post.
As for muscular loading, that is EXACTLY why you exercise a muscle and what makes it respond. Unloading it is a step in the wrong direction. Unless of course, you are taking a break.
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krazy kaju

LOL, apparently marc knows more physiology than anyone else on this board. But he has yet to share any of his knowledge.
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Turpin

Heres an outline of my present training regime ( & that which we have seen lots of success with previously )

Cyclical effort training;

Workout Sun /Thurs /Tues / Sun ....etc
Effort should be concentrated upon making the targeted reps ( or more ! ) in the main lift.
It pays in the initial weeks/first cycle to be conservative with the resistance choice
as after 2-3 cycles the resistance on upperbody work would have increased 10lbs or more
& 30 lbs or more on lower body and likely into new personal best territory ( which is the aim )
The assistance exercises should be performed NTF with resistance and reps remaining constant
over the 4 week cycle.
Rest intervals are approx 2-3 mins on the main lift & 1 min for assistance exercises.


Workout 1 ; D/Bell bench press
Week 1 8+ reps @ moderate ( 2 sets )
Week 2 5+ reps @ moderate-heavy ( 2 sets )
Week 3 3+ reps @ heavy ( 2 sets )
Week 4 8+ reps light ( de-load )
Repeat weeks 1-4 with 2 kg added resistance

Assistance exercises ;
D/b rows 3 sets 10 reps.
Tricep ext / face pulls ( 3 supersets of 10 reps )



Workout 2 ; Leg press
Week 1 15+ reps @ moderate ( 2 sets )
Week 2 10+ reps @ moderate-heavy ( 2 sets )
Week 3 5 + reps @ heavy ( 2 sets )
Week 4 15+ reps @ light ( de-load )
Repeat weeks 1-4 with approx 5 kg added resistance.

Assistance exercises ;
Leg ext / Leg curl ( 3 supersets of 10 reps )
Toe press 2 x 15 reps


Workout 3; Standing shoulder press
Week 1 8+ reps @ moderate ( 2 sets )
Week 2 5+ reps @ moderate-heavy ( 2 sets )
Week 3 3+ rep @ heavy ( 2 sets )
Week 4 8 reps @ light ( de-load )
Repeat weeks 1-4 with 2 kg added resistance

Assistance exercises ;
Chins / Dips ( 3 supersets of 8 reps )

Workout 4 ; Squat
Week 1 15+ reps @ moderate ( 2 sets )
Week 2 10+ reps @ moderate - heavy ( 2 sets )
Week 3 5 + reps @ heavy ( 2 sets )
Week 4 15 reps @ light ( de-load )
Repeat weeks 1-4 with approx 5 kg added resistance

assistance exercises;.
calf raise 2 x 15 reps
hyper ext / leg raise ( 3 supersets of 15 reps )


Simple but effective !!

T.

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Turpin

fbcoach wrote:
DeadTrap. wrote:
Turpin wrote:
I tried SSTF training over some 8 weeks and was simply burnt out as a result.

That would be the result of a lot of harsh muscular loading and little resulting INROAD.

This "burnt out" feeling can be eliminated if you reduce the load and focus on DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD.

INROAD is just a made-up marketing term, similar to your post.
As for muscular loading, that is EXACTLY why you exercise a muscle and what makes it respond.


Very true ... but You are going to have to complicate your post a little `Coach` by inserting some scientific terminology or the like , otherwise it holds no ground ;) LOL

T.
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RW Hawk

Virgin Islands

Turpin wrote:
Really ? .... Id say it was the result of CNS fatigue from training to failure !


You can't blame "failure."

TTF in and of itself is essentially harmless.

It's the load you were using (too heavy) and the way in which you were using it that resulted in a high level of fatigue/exhaustion with a small commensurate degree of INROAD.

Put another way, you were largely demonstrating strength and not building it.
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RW Hawk

Virgin Islands

Turpin wrote:
Such high effort cannot be sustained every workout lest progress grinds to a halt and regression is inevitable.


Wrong culprit.

It's virtually impossible to have "too high" a level of effort. The body is amazingly self-regulating in that regard.

You were attempting to impose a demand by way of a load that you did not advance to "require," but because you achieved an arbitrary and predetermined rep count.
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Turpin

DeadTrap. wrote:
Turpin wrote:
Really ? .... Id say it was the result of CNS fatigue from training to failure !

You can't blame "failure."

TTF in and of itself is essentially harmless.

It's the load you were using (too heavy) and the way in which you were using it that resulted in a high level of fatigue/exhaustion with a small commensurate degree of INROAD.

Put another way, you were largely demonstrating strength and not building it.


Really ? .... But I was performing a routine of a single static hold/negative to failure ( Terry Carters advocated `ultimate rep` ) for TUL so there was no strength demonstration :)

See videos below.


http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=oKYpdyhAZGg

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=D54HqWJ3hmY

I believe both Terry & Doug Mc Guff used similar protocol at one time.
It certainly brought about results , but it also caused me to prolong my recovery and eventually burn out.



T.
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Turpin

DeadTrap. wrote:
Turpin wrote:
Such high effort cannot be sustained every workout lest progress grinds to a halt and regression is inevitable.

Wrong culprit.

It's virtually impossible to have "too high" a level of effort. The body is amazingly self-regulating in that regard.

You were attempting to impose a demand by way of a load that you did not advance to "require," but because you achieved an arbitrary and predetermined rep count.


Nonsense , I wasnt counting reps ( see above videos )

T :)
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fbcoach

DeadTrap. wrote:


You were attempting to impose a demand by way of a load that you did not advance to "require," but because you achieved an arbitrary and predetermined rep count.


And your attempt at gaining credibilty, by changing your verbal usage of language just won't work. Especially when you use them out of context and under the pretext of false assumptions.
No matter how hard you try, no one will ever believe a word you say. The only way you will ever be accepted is to be USED by those with which you agree, unconditionally. The second you deviate even the slightest, you will be shunned and excavated like the petrified dung you are. You, Bob Float, are destined to stay a NUTTHUGGER, without an original thought or testicle to call your own.

Strength and hypertrophy are undeniably the result of intensity (%RM or tension) and workload. This is just undisputable facts, and the reason we even use weights, apparatuses, or machines. Why would anyone severely limit themselves to just one aspect, for instance, like rep speed, or vague pseudo-terms like inroad, then proclaim they found the Rosetta Stone? It appears quackery isn't limited to the medical profession. If it looks like a duck..sounds like a duck........
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HeavyHitter32

DeadTrap. wrote:
Turpin wrote:
Such high effort cannot be sustained every workout lest progress grinds to a halt and regression is inevitable.

Wrong culprit.

It's virtually impossible to have "too high" a level of effort. The body is amazingly self-regulating in that regard.

You were attempting to impose a demand by way of a load that you did not advance to "require," but because you achieved an arbitrary and predetermined rep count.


No athlete in any endeavor can train at 100% effort all of the time while sustaining maximum/optimal performance. It has never been done and never will. Your other comment about the not being able to train too hard is laughable. I really don't know where you come up with this stuff.

Is this all part of your "roading" "Exercise Science" dictionary? Inroading, outroading, uproading, downroading, leftroading, rightroading, etc. Really textbook exercise physiology stuff there. LOL



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RW Hawk

Virgin Islands

Turpin wrote:
Nonsense , I wasnt counting reps ( see above videos )


Arbitrary.

Did you post the leg press one?

Serge Nubret training is a good example of achieving DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD without harsh muscular loading.

Your LP video is a good example of harsh muscular loading with little commensurate INROAD.

You are using too heavy a load which necessitates the poor technique you employ to move it. You aren't doing much with it otherwise.

The result is high fatigue/exhaustion with little relative INROAD.
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summaHIT

Ontario, CAN

DeadTrap. wrote:
Turpin wrote:
Really ? .... Id say it was the result of CNS fatigue from training to failure !

You can't blame "failure."

TTF in and of itself is essentially harmless.

It's the load you were using (too heavy) and the way in which you were using it that resulted in a high level of fatigue/exhaustion with a small commensurate degree of INROAD.

Put another way, you were largely demonstrating strength and not building it.


inroad? LOL. You are fucking hilarious!
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marcrph

Spain

krazy kaju wrote:
LOL, apparently marc knows more physiology than anyone else on this board. But he has yet to share any of his knowledge.


What physiology do want me to share....I gave you a huge secret for free...ie....the phosphagen pool.
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fbcoach

DeadTrap. wrote:
Turpin wrote:
Nonsense , I wasnt counting reps ( see above videos )


Arbitrary.

Did you post the leg press one?

Serge Nubret training is a good example of achieving DEEP MUSCULAR INROAD without harsh muscular loading.

Your LP video is a good example of harsh muscular loading with little commensurate INROAD.

You are using too heavy a load which necessitates the poor technique you employ to move it. You aren't doing much with it otherwise.

The result is high fatigue/exhaustion with little relative INROAD.
[/quote
You obviously don't understand what you are watching. His form is impeccable, placing all the focus on the targeted muscle.

As for Nubret, he trained using moderate weights and very high volume. Just what you always said was wrong. And now, you use as an example in your post. You appear very confused.
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summaHIT

Ontario, CAN

marcrph wrote:
krazy kaju wrote:
LOL, apparently marc knows more physiology than anyone else on this board. But he has yet to share any of his knowledge.

What physiology do want me to share....I gave you a huge secret for free...ie....the phosphagen pool.


I thought he would be more thankful about you correcting his belief that SSTF is the best for recruiting the HTMU's!

Krazy: "As we know, SSTF workouts are best for stimulating the fast-twitch fibers most capable of growth in a safe and efficient manner."

Marcrph: "This is blatantly not true."
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krazy kaju

marcrph wrote:
krazy kaju wrote:
LOL, apparently marc knows more physiology than anyone else on this board. But he has yet to share any of his knowledge.

What physiology do want me to share....I gave you a huge secret for free...ie....the phosphagen pool.


Yes, you've shared that. And it is not a reason to not train SSTF.
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