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X-FORCE in Gainesville
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st3

The subjects in Gainesville have done the following in their X-Force training:

Weeks 1 & 2: One set of 4 X-Force machines.
Weeks 3 & 4: One set of 5 X-Force machines.
Weeks 5 & 6: One set of 6 X-Force machines.

Each subject performs from 6 to 8 repetitions, using a 3-1-5 count, with as much resistance as possible.

Each subject trains twice a week: on Monday and Thursday.

No other vigorous exercise is permitted during the study.

The subjects who finish the first six weeks and continue for another six weeks, will train only 1 time a week. They will perform 8 exercises.

Elington

[/quote]

Any warm ups?
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Turpin wrote:
AShortt wrote:
I'd nit-pick...I mean fine tune that to 3-1-3.

I'd like to know how well the machines accomodate really heavy types. I find Med X is not so accomodating for those with major weight to lose especially if they have a stalky physique.

Regards,
Andrew

Andrew , what difference does the negative cadence have on individuals who are of more endo/meso in makeup ? ... or moreso how does meso/endomorphic makeup dictate the negative cadence ?

T.


Not an issue of somatic type just a performance tweak I think makes as difference over the long run.
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Ellington Darden

st3 wrote:
The subjects in Gainesville have done the following in their X-Force training:

Weeks 1 & 2: One set of 4 X-Force machines.
Weeks 3 & 4: One set of 5 X-Force machines.
Weeks 5 & 6: One set of 6 X-Force machines.

Each subject performs from 6 to 8 repetitions, using a 3-1-5 count, with as much resistance as possible.

Each subject trains twice a week: on Monday and Thursday.

No other vigorous exercise is permitted during the study.

The subjects who finish the first six weeks and continue for another six weeks, will train only 1 time a week. They will perform 8 exercises.

Elington



Any warm ups?


No warm ups are needed.

Ellington

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Tony Williams

entsminger wrote:
Tony Williams wrote:
bobj wrote:
Doc, are you also using the X-Force machines while you are there? If so, how are they working for you? The older guys in the forum (like me) would probably like to know if there is still a shot at building additional muscle after 60yo for those that have trained for many years.

Just my observation, after more than a year and a half of all-compound, abbreviated workouts, I continue to increase my lifts and reps regularly albeit not every workout.

Recently, my improvement has surprised me. I believe deeper sleep and nutrition has helped as such factors would help anyone of any age.

However, at 60 years of age in February, I often believe my day of reckoning may be near. But, who knows?

Most importantly, if I live to 80, 90 or even 100, can I train in such a manner that I retain balance and strength so I am not confined to a walker or cart in the next decades? Aside from weight training, I do a lot of dexterity and balance exercises.

In the long run, mobility at an old age is far more important than a 300-pound bench press.

But I would like to do both.

Tony

==Scott==
I always wanted to be able to do a 300 bench but never got even close, maybe 250? I'm curious, what's your best bench Tony. Now I'd never attempt something even close to that out of fear if injury.


Scott,

Although I would like to bench 300, I would have to find a time machine to do it.

Probably 225 to 235 was my best around 32 at a weight of about 175, but my training was poor then -- overtrained and too many isolation exercises.

Right now, I can do 200 for a couple of reps, but only after building up to it after illness.

In 2006, I was ill and so weak, I could not lift the end of the sofa. On an incline bench press, I could barely do 110 lbs. when I started working out again in 2007. At one point, I was down to 149 at 5'10". I felt terrible and looked just as bad.

Today, I was reading about "Mr. Deadlift", Bob Peoples, who was deadlifting 700-plus lbs. in the 1940s, yet his bench press, according to a couple of sources, was "only" 300 lbs.

But my point actually was this: I would much rather have excellent mobility, dexterity and strength in my 70's, 80's and 90's than to lift 300 pounds today. And the time to build that foundation of strong muscles, hard bones and tough tendons and ligaments for the future is now.

However, if you and I outlive everyone, we may be the 90-plus Masters' weightlifting champions in 2042. :)

Tony
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st3

Ellington Darden wrote:
st3 wrote:
The subjects in Gainesville have done the following in their X-Force training:

Weeks 1 & 2: One set of 4 X-Force machines.
Weeks 3 & 4: One set of 5 X-Force machines.
Weeks 5 & 6: One set of 6 X-Force machines.

Each subject performs from 6 to 8 repetitions, using a 3-1-5 count, with as much resistance as possible.

Each subject trains twice a week: on Monday and Thursday.

No other vigorous exercise is permitted during the study.

The subjects who finish the first six weeks and continue for another six weeks, will train only 1 time a week. They will perform 8 exercises.

Elington



Any warm ups?

No warm ups are needed.

Ellington



Dr. D,
How long is the average workout?
Steve
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Ellington Darden

Steve,

The average X-Force workout is less than than 30 minutes. And once you get the hang of it, it's around 20 minutes.

Ellington
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Ellington Darden

Guys,

Roger Schwab in Philadelphia sent me a link to five X-Force exercises performed at his Main Line Health and Fitness Center.

http://www.youtube.com/...user/mlhfitness

Most of you will be very interested in watching Roger do a set on the X-Force Biceps Curl machine. Roger is 66 years old and he has some mighty impressive arms.

Ellington
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Hitit

Very cool to see those in action. Love how you HAVE TO pause at the full contracted position and wait for the added negative to swing into place.

Awesome!

Brian
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Turpin

Ellington Darden wrote:
Guys,

Roger Schwab in Philadelphia sent me a link to five X-Force exercises performed at his Main Line Health and Fitness Center.

http://www.youtube.com/...user/mlhfitness

Most of you will be very interested in watching Roger do a set on the X-Force Biceps Curl machine. Roger is 66 years old and he has some mighty impressive arms.

Ellington



Great stuff indeed & in great shape for 66yrs ! .... That Tracy Hoffman has great shape/development too , check out the pulldown video.

T.
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Ellington Darden wrote:
Guys,

Roger Schwab in Philadelphia sent me a link to five X-Force exercises performed at his Main Line Health and Fitness Center.

http://www.youtube.com/...user/mlhfitness

Most of you will be very interested in watching Roger do a set on the X-Force Biceps Curl machine. Roger is 66 years old and he has some mighty impressive arms.

Ellington


I like the look of the curl position, what do you think of it Dr Darden?

Regards,
Andrew
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Ellington Darden

AShortt wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
Guys,

Roger Schwab in Philadelphia sent me a link to five X-Force exercises performed at his Main Line Health and Fitness Center.

http://www.youtube.com/...user/mlhfitness

Most of you will be very interested in watching Roger do a set on the X-Force Biceps Curl machine. Roger is 66 years old and he has some mighty impressive arms.

Ellington

I like the look of the curl position, what do you think of it Dr Darden?

Regards,
Andrew


It felt a little uncomfortable the first time I did it. By the third time, it was smooth and on-target. I like it now.

Ellington

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cmg

great looking machines - thank you for the updates and videos!!

Regards,

Ron
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Ellington Darden

There are four new videos from Roger Schwab's club, posted on You Tube, which show proper form on various X-Force machines. There are now nine, short videos in total.

Everyone on this forum should watch them.

Ellington
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Hitit wrote:
Very cool to see those in action. Love how you HAVE TO pause at the full contracted position and wait for the added negative to swing into place.

Awesome!

Brian


==Scott==
Not that this is a bad thing but I take it one has to pause at the top and hold until the stack changes position before lowering again? I'm guessing if you didn't pause would the sack not change position?
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TOM C

Ellington Darden wrote:
There are four new videos from Roger Schwab's club, posted on You Tube, which show proper form on various X-Force machines. There are now nine, short videos in total.

Everyone on this forum should watch them.

Ellington


Great videos!

The tricep machine is similiar to the original Nautilus Compound tricep except the elbow pads are farther forward (which is a good thing).

I really like the design and position of the bicep elbow pads.

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HeavyHitter32

Good videos.
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

entsminger wrote:
Hitit wrote:
Very cool to see those in action. Love how you HAVE TO pause at the full contracted position and wait for the added negative to swing into place.

Awesome!

Brian

==Scott==
Not that this is a bad thing but I take it one has to pause at the top and hold until the stack changes position before lowering again? I'm guessing if you didn't pause would the sack not change position?


I think the stack is released as soon as you hit the top, the pause is just to take the proper time and form to let the stack sit fully upright. I like that because it is a good teaching aid for clients to pause at full contraction and squeeze.

Regards,
Andrew
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Ellington Darden

Andrew,

The weight stack on an X-Force machine has a sensor involved in the tilting motion. When the weight moves positively in the 45-degree angle, the moment you begin to perform the negative phase, the weight stack instantly tilts back to the upright, vertical position.

It's not the pause that causes the tilt. It's the slightest negative movement.

Thus, a trainee can confuse the machine if he jams or bobbles at the top, or does partial reps.

It works best if there's a distinct pause at the top, then a slow transition into the negative.

Ellington
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Hitit

Ellington Darden wrote:
Andrew,

The weight stack on an X-Force machine has a sensor involved in the tilting motion. When the weight moves positively in the 45-degree angle, the moment you begin to perform the negative phase, the weight stack instantly tilts back to the upright, vertical position.

It's not the pause that causes the tilt. It's the slightest negative movement.

Thus, a trainee can confuse the machine if he jams or bobbles at the top, or does partial reps.

It works best if there's a distinct pause at the top, then a slow transition into the negative.

Ellington


I like it!
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SB2006

Thanks for the updates Dr. Darden. The X Force machines are fascinating and definitely the most aesthetic, eye catching machines that I have seen. I'm really looking forward to future updates!
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DownUnderLifter

Thanks Dr D. Those X-FORCE machines are awesome. Roger looks in great shape too!

DUL
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Tony Williams

Perhaps we all will have a chance to experience X-FORCE in the near future. I hope so.

At least for me, it is a bit difficult to understand how the machines work and feel until I have a chance to work out on the machines.

What fitness center, if any, is in line for X-FORCE next?

Tony
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Ellington Darden wrote:
Andrew,

The weight stack on an X-Force machine has a sensor involved in the tilting motion. When the weight moves positively in the 45-degree angle, the moment you begin to perform the negative phase, the weight stack instantly tilts back to the upright, vertical position.

It's not the pause that causes the tilt. It's the slightest negative movement.

Thus, a trainee can confuse the machine if he jams or bobbles at the top, or does partial reps.

It works best if there's a distinct pause at the top, then a slow transition into the negative.

Ellington


Wow, thats smart and sort of makes the whole thing a bit more intuitive. This was one of my concerns that transition was a bit forced. With it being a matter of releasing the connection I see more overall control and fine tuning from the user possible...interesting.

Regards,
Andrew
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Ellington Darden

Once you get the hang of X-Force -- and it only takes a couple of sessions -- the transitions between the positive and negative, and the negative and the positive seem NATURAL or NORMAL.

I'm not sure about the exact wording, but the gravity of the situation -- the tilting of the weight stack -- is really something you have to "feel" to appreciate.

The X-Force tilting weight-stack machines are so much better that any of the forms of electrical, negative-accentuated resistance machines, which just don't have the right feel.

Ellington
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Ellington Darden

Once you get the hang of X-Force -- and it only takes a couple of sessions -- the transitions between the positive and negative, and the negative and the positive seem NATURAL or NORMAL.

I'm not sure about the exact wording, but the gravity of the situation -- the tilting of the weight stack -- is really something you have to "feel" to appreciate.

The X-Force tilting weight-stack machines are so much better that any of the forms of electrical, negative-accentuated resistance machines, which just don't have the right feel.

Ellington
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