MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
What Really Causes Heart Disease
First | Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | Next | Last
Author
Rating
Options

fbcoach

kulitsa wrote:
Turpin wrote:
kulitsa wrote:
Turpin wrote:
My diet mon-fri reads.

B`fast ; 6 eggs scrambled in butter with chopped spinach.

Lunch; Smoked mackerel salad with full fat mayo.

Tea meal; Steak or ground beef burger ( 1 lb ) with onion & pancetta ham , with greens.

Eve snack; cheese/wine.


T.

Turpin, why only Mon-Fri.? How is Saturday-Sunday different?

Albert


The weekend carbs are to replace the glycogen to the musculature by way of creating an insulin sensitivity ( midweek ) then a spike ( weekend ). This carb loading is continued for 36-48 hrs ( enough to realise glycogen replacement , but not store bodyfat ) then its back to low carb eating & using fats as fuel.

T.


Interesting, thank you T.



I don't mean to be a butt-in-ski here. I apologize if I offend T. or Kulista, but I would just like to add: During the week of low-carbs, the body will switch over to burning ketones (ingested fat and bodyfat). After your body adjusts to the new diet, you basically have an unlimited source of energy from fat.

Also, the body will produce more of its growth hormones due to low blood sugar, or I should say stable insulin levels. Also, the body will produce more of the fat metabolizing hormones, while eating an ample supply of calories to stave off catabolism as much as possible.
When switching back to higher carbs on the weekend, you can take advantage of insulin, another anabolic hormone.

You just have to be extremely careful about the "spill-over" effect. Not only fat but excess water-retention. The most water-retentive hormone is insulin, which stimulates aldosterone.

Balancing all of this takes experimentation, as well as a great deal of discipline. I used this diet quite effectively a long time ago. The only draw-back is if you come off the diet, it takes a while for the body to start converting the excess carbs as energy, but if you are very disciplined, this diet can be quite effective....especially trainees that believe they are hardgainers and gain fat easily on conventional diets.

Again, hope I wasn't intruding on anybody's posts. GOOD LUCK with it and give it a try!
Open User Options Menu

gerry-hitman

southbeach wrote:
AShortt wrote:
southbeach wrote:
WesH wrote:
southbeach wrote:
He admits he's clueless and seems he is still. :/

Which means he's way ahead of you.

Of course there's a good solid connection b/w excess fat in the diet, esp sat and tran type, and trashed lipids. Adding to what ever inflammation is already there from other cause. Resulting in a higher risk of damaged CVS.

Cutting sat and trans fat (and maybe even mono) reduces the inflammation and this risk. A huge amount of evidence and research supports this!

But "moderation" doesn't work. Do you think taking a 2 pack a day smoker to "a" pack a day makes a big diff? Why assume reducing fat from 35-40% of total cals to 25% would make a big diff to CVD either?

Dean Ornish among others has shown what works.



Sir, you out to read about A.G.E's and find out what the real issue is. It just so happens they are present in high numbers where saturated fats are. The actual culprit isn't the fat.

Regards,
Andrew

Speculation on your part, pure speculation.

Of course, should you provide even a tidbit of evidence to support your contention I'd be more than happy to look at it.


Tidbits?

we have posted volumes and you never look into it, you see what you want to see...

In short your an idiot, and you know it
Open User Options Menu

southbeach

gerry-hitman wrote:
southbeach wrote:
AShortt wrote:
southbeach wrote:
WesH wrote:
southbeach wrote:
He admits he's clueless and seems he is still. :/

Which means he's way ahead of you.

Of course there's a good solid connection b/w excess fat in the diet, esp sat and tran type, and trashed lipids. Adding to what ever inflammation is already there from other cause. Resulting in a higher risk of damaged CVS.

Cutting sat and trans fat (and maybe even mono) reduces the inflammation and this risk. A huge amount of evidence and research supports this!

But "moderation" doesn't work. Do you think taking a 2 pack a day smoker to "a" pack a day makes a big diff? Why assume reducing fat from 35-40% of total cals to 25% would make a big diff to CVD either?

Dean Ornish among others has shown what works.



Sir, you out to read about A.G.E's and find out what the real issue is. It just so happens they are present in high numbers where saturated fats are. The actual culprit isn't the fat.

Regards,
Andrew

Speculation on your part, pure speculation.

Of course, should you provide even a tidbit of evidence to support your contention I'd be more than happy to look at it.

Tidbits?

we have posted volumes and you never look into it, you see what you want to see...

In short your an idiot, and you know it


You nor anyone else has posted anything about AGE as "a" cause or "the" cause of CVD.

Try to keep up, or shut up.
Open User Options Menu

Turpin

fbcoach wrote:
kulitsa wrote:
Turpin wrote:
kulitsa wrote:
Turpin wrote:
My diet mon-fri reads.

B`fast ; 6 eggs scrambled in butter with chopped spinach.

Lunch; Smoked mackerel salad with full fat mayo.

Tea meal; Steak or ground beef burger ( 1 lb ) with onion & pancetta ham , with greens.

Eve snack; cheese/wine.


T.

Turpin, why only Mon-Fri.? How is Saturday-Sunday different?

Albert


The weekend carbs are to replace the glycogen to the musculature by way of creating an insulin sensitivity ( midweek ) then a spike ( weekend ). This carb loading is continued for 36-48 hrs ( enough to realise glycogen replacement , but not store bodyfat ) then its back to low carb eating & using fats as fuel.

T.


Interesting, thank you T.



I don't mean to be a butt-in-ski here. I apologize if I offend T. or Kulista, but I would just like to add: During the week of low-carbs, the body will switch over to burning ketones (ingested fat and bodyfat). After your body adjusts to the new diet, you basically have an unlimited source of energy from fat.

Also, the body will produce more of its growth hormones due to low blood sugar, or I should say stable insulin levels. Also, the body will produce more of the fat metabolizing hormones, while eating an ample supply of calories to stave off catabolism as much as possible.
When switching back to higher carbs on the weekend, you can take advantage of insulin, another anabolic hormone.

You just have to be extremely careful about the "spill-over" effect. Not only fat but excess water-retention. The most water-retentive hormone is insulin, which stimulates aldosterone.

Balancing all of this takes experimentation, as well as a great deal of discipline. I used this diet quite effectively a long time ago. The only draw-back is if you come off the diet, it takes a while for the body to start converting the excess carbs as energy, but if you are very disciplined, this diet can be quite effective....especially trainees that believe they are hardgainers and gain fat easily on conventional diets.

Again, hope I wasn't intruding on anybody's posts. GOOD LUCK with it and give it a try!



Many thanks for the input `Coach`. Yes I agree regarding the water retention during the carb loading phase.
I personally dont like the weekend eating & dont binge , but instead simply eat a `clean` high carb intake. But by Sat evening/Sun morning I look very bloated and heavy and already looking forward to abstinence from carbs. By Tuesday Im back to a more defined appearance.

TBH I often wonder ( as someone alluded to in another thread ) if I would fare better by simply taking in a very high carb meal post workout rather than over 2 days.

T.
Open User Options Menu

fbcoach

Turpin wrote:
fbcoach wrote:
kulitsa wrote:
Turpin wrote:
kulitsa wrote:
Turpin wrote:
My diet mon-fri reads.

B`fast ; 6 eggs scrambled in butter with chopped spinach.

Lunch; Smoked mackerel salad with full fat mayo.

Tea meal; Steak or ground beef burger ( 1 lb ) with onion & pancetta ham , with greens.

Eve snack; cheese/wine.


T.

Turpin, why only Mon-Fri.? How is Saturday-Sunday different?

Albert


The weekend carbs are to replace the glycogen to the musculature by way of creating an insulin sensitivity ( midweek ) then a spike ( weekend ). This carb loading is continued for 36-48 hrs ( enough to realise glycogen replacement , but not store bodyfat ) then its back to low carb eating & using fats as fuel.

T.


Interesting, thank you T.



I don't mean to be a butt-in-ski here. I apologize if I offend T. or Kulista, but I would just like to add: During the week of low-carbs, the body will switch over to burning ketones (ingested fat and bodyfat). After your body adjusts to the new diet, you basically have an unlimited source of energy from fat.

Also, the body will produce more of its growth hormones due to low blood sugar, or I should say stable insulin levels. Also, the body will produce more of the fat metabolizing hormones, while eating an ample supply of calories to stave off catabolism as much as possible.
When switching back to higher carbs on the weekend, you can take advantage of insulin, another anabolic hormone.

You just have to be extremely careful about the "spill-over" effect. Not only fat but excess water-retention. The most water-retentive hormone is insulin, which stimulates aldosterone.

Balancing all of this takes experimentation, as well as a great deal of discipline. I used this diet quite effectively a long time ago. The only draw-back is if you come off the diet, it takes a while for the body to start converting the excess carbs as energy, but if you are very disciplined, this diet can be quite effective....especially trainees that believe they are hardgainers and gain fat easily on conventional diets.

Again, hope I wasn't intruding on anybody's posts. GOOD LUCK with it and give it a try!


Many thanks for the input `Coach`. Yes I agree regarding the water retention during the carb loading phase.
I personally dont like the weekend eating & dont binge , but instead simply eat a `clean` high carb intake. But by Sat evening/Sun morning I look very bloated and heavy and already looking forward to abstinence from carbs. By Tuesday Im back to a more defined appearance.

TBH I often wonder ( as someone alluded to in another thread ) if I would fare better by simply taking in a very high carb meal post workout rather than over 2 days.

T.


Thanks T.,
I had a lot of experience with the diet. Like you, I didn't care for the bloat after 2 days of carbs or the tiredness. I switched to just a one day carb-up. I still had the tiredness and bloat. I finally settled on just an evening carb-up on Wednesdays and Saturdays. This addressed the tiredness and the water retention issues in my case.

In all honesty, this was the most amazing diet I had ever followed. You can tailor it or modify it as you see fit. I even went 50gms of carbs for months on end without a carb-up. That was a disaster when re-introducing carbs. Just play with it a bit, and you will figure out what is best for you.
Open User Options Menu

Turpin

Your right on re; the tiredness that ensues with carbing up `Coach`. Consequently there is no way I could/would train on a weekend whilst carbing.

T.
Open User Options Menu

entsminger

Virginia, USA

southbeach wrote:
AShortt wrote:
southbeach wrote:
WesH wrote:
southbeach wrote:
He admits he's clueless and seems he is still. :/

Which means he's way ahead of you.

Of course there's a good solid connection b/w excess fat in the diet, esp sat and tran type, and trashed lipids. Adding to what ever inflammation is already there from other cause. Resulting in a higher risk of damaged CVS.

Cutting sat and trans fat (and maybe even mono) reduces the inflammation and this risk. A huge amount of evidence and research supports this!

But "moderation" doesn't work. Do you think taking a 2 pack a day smoker to "a" pack a day makes a big diff? Why assume reducing fat from 35-40% of total cals to 25% would make a big diff to CVD either?

Dean Ornish among others has shown what works.



Sir, you out to read about A.G.E's and find out what the real issue is. It just so happens they are present in high numbers where saturated fats are. The actual culprit isn't the fat.

Regards,
Andrew

Speculation on your part, pure speculation.

Of course, should you provide even a tidbit of evidence to support your contention I'd be more than happy to look at it.


==Scott==
You'd look at it and come back against it regardless of what it says. I'm wondering,when you were little kid your dad take you to the pig slaughter house and somehow several pig carcasses fell on you and you layed there for hours screaming, get this fat off of me, hense this Monk like aversion to fat??
Open User Options Menu

southbeach

AGE (advanced glycation endproduct) is a cause of inflammation and systemic damage.Meat, poultry and cheese and product made from those are the reason for much of our exposure to this noxious compound.

Here's a list..

http://inhumanexperiment.blogs...

Whole natural vegetables, unroasted nuts, seeds, beans, fruits are natually low in AGE's, so limiting meat radically cut exposure.
Open User Options Menu

kulitsa

New York, USA

fbcoach wrote:
kulitsa wrote:
Turpin wrote:
kulitsa wrote:
Turpin wrote:
My diet mon-fri reads.

B`fast ; 6 eggs scrambled in butter with chopped spinach.

Lunch; Smoked mackerel salad with full fat mayo.

Tea meal; Steak or ground beef burger ( 1 lb ) with onion & pancetta ham , with greens.

Eve snack; cheese/wine.


T.

Turpin, why only Mon-Fri.? How is Saturday-Sunday different?

Albert


The weekend carbs are to replace the glycogen to the musculature by way of creating an insulin sensitivity ( midweek ) then a spike ( weekend ). This carb loading is continued for 36-48 hrs ( enough to realise glycogen replacement , but not store bodyfat ) then its back to low carb eating & using fats as fuel.

T.


Interesting, thank you T.



I don't mean to be a butt-in-ski here. I apologize if I offend T. or Kulista, but I would just like to add: During the week of low-carbs, the body will switch over to burning ketones (ingested fat and bodyfat). After your body adjusts to the new diet, you basically have an unlimited source of energy from fat.

Also, the body will produce more of its growth hormones due to low blood sugar, or I should say stable insulin levels. Also, the body will produce more of the fat metabolizing hormones, while eating an ample supply of calories to stave off catabolism as much as possible.
When switching back to higher carbs on the weekend, you can take advantage of insulin, another anabolic hormone.

You just have to be extremely careful about the "spill-over" effect. Not only fat but excess water-retention. The most water-retentive hormone is insulin, which stimulates aldosterone.

Balancing all of this takes experimentation, as well as a great deal of discipline. I used this diet quite effectively a long time ago. The only draw-back is if you come off the diet, it takes a while for the body to start converting the excess carbs as energy, but if you are very disciplined, this diet can be quite effective....especially trainees that believe they are hardgainers and gain fat easily on conventional diets.

Again, hope I wasn't intruding on anybody's posts. GOOD LUCK with it and give it a try!


Thank you coach, this is very interesting. Appreciate your input.

Open User Options Menu

kulitsa

New York, USA

fbcoach wrote:
Turpin wrote:
fbcoach wrote:
kulitsa wrote:
Turpin wrote:
kulitsa wrote:
Turpin wrote:
My diet mon-fri reads.

B`fast ; 6 eggs scrambled in butter with chopped spinach.

Lunch; Smoked mackerel salad with full fat mayo.

Tea meal; Steak or ground beef burger ( 1 lb ) with onion & pancetta ham , with greens.

Eve snack; cheese/wine.


T.

Turpin, why only Mon-Fri.? How is Saturday-Sunday different?

Albert


The weekend carbs are to replace the glycogen to the musculature by way of creating an insulin sensitivity ( midweek ) then a spike ( weekend ). This carb loading is continued for 36-48 hrs ( enough to realise glycogen replacement , but not store bodyfat ) then its back to low carb eating & using fats as fuel.

T.


Interesting, thank you T.



I don't mean to be a butt-in-ski here. I apologize if I offend T. or Kulista, but I would just like to add: During the week of low-carbs, the body will switch over to burning ketones (ingested fat and bodyfat). After your body adjusts to the new diet, you basically have an unlimited source of energy from fat.

Also, the body will produce more of its growth hormones due to low blood sugar, or I should say stable insulin levels. Also, the body will produce more of the fat metabolizing hormones, while eating an ample supply of calories to stave off catabolism as much as possible.
When switching back to higher carbs on the weekend, you can take advantage of insulin, another anabolic hormone.

You just have to be extremely careful about the "spill-over" effect. Not only fat but excess water-retention. The most water-retentive hormone is insulin, which stimulates aldosterone.

Balancing all of this takes experimentation, as well as a great deal of discipline. I used this diet quite effectively a long time ago. The only draw-back is if you come off the diet, it takes a while for the body to start converting the excess carbs as energy, but if you are very disciplined, this diet can be quite effective....especially trainees that believe they are hardgainers and gain fat easily on conventional diets.

Again, hope I wasn't intruding on anybody's posts. GOOD LUCK with it and give it a try!


Many thanks for the input `Coach`. Yes I agree regarding the water retention during the carb loading phase.
I personally dont like the weekend eating & dont binge , but instead simply eat a `clean` high carb intake. But by Sat evening/Sun morning I look very bloated and heavy and already looking forward to abstinence from carbs. By Tuesday Im back to a more defined appearance.

TBH I often wonder ( as someone alluded to in another thread ) if I would fare better by simply taking in a very high carb meal post workout rather than over 2 days.

T.

Thanks T.,
I had a lot of experience with the diet. Like you, I didn't care for the bloat after 2 days of carbs or the tiredness. I switched to just a one day carb-up. I still had the tiredness and bloat. I finally settled on just an evening carb-up on Wednesdays and Saturdays. This addressed the tiredness and the water retention issues in my case.

In all honesty, this was the most amazing diet I had ever followed. You can tailor it or modify it as you see fit. I even went 50gms of carbs for months on end without a carb-up. That was a disaster when re-introducing carbs. Just play with it a bit, and you will figure out what is best for you.


Coach,

Do you mind giving n example of Wednesday Saturday carb-up. What would go into those meals?

Albert
Open User Options Menu

fbcoach

kulitsa wrote:
fbcoach wrote:
Turpin wrote:
fbcoach wrote:
kulitsa wrote:
Turpin wrote:
kulitsa wrote:
Turpin wrote:
My diet mon-fri reads.

B`fast ; 6 eggs scrambled in butter with chopped spinach.

Lunch; Smoked mackerel salad with full fat mayo.

Tea meal; Steak or ground beef burger ( 1 lb ) with onion & pancetta ham , with greens.

Eve snack; cheese/wine.


T.

Turpin, why only Mon-Fri.? How is Saturday-Sunday different?

Albert


The weekend carbs are to replace the glycogen to the musculature by way of creating an insulin sensitivity ( midweek ) then a spike ( weekend ). This carb loading is continued for 36-48 hrs ( enough to realise glycogen replacement , but not store bodyfat ) then its back to low carb eating & using fats as fuel.

T.


Interesting, thank you T.



I don't mean to be a butt-in-ski here. I apologize if I offend T. or Kulista, but I would just like to add: During the week of low-carbs, the body will switch over to burning ketones (ingested fat and bodyfat). After your body adjusts to the new diet, you basically have an unlimited source of energy from fat.

Also, the body will produce more of its growth hormones due to low blood sugar, or I should say stable insulin levels. Also, the body will produce more of the fat metabolizing hormones, while eating an ample supply of calories to stave off catabolism as much as possible.
When switching back to higher carbs on the weekend, you can take advantage of insulin, another anabolic hormone.

You just have to be extremely careful about the "spill-over" effect. Not only fat but excess water-retention. The most water-retentive hormone is insulin, which stimulates aldosterone.

Balancing all of this takes experimentation, as well as a great deal of discipline. I used this diet quite effectively a long time ago. The only draw-back is if you come off the diet, it takes a while for the body to start converting the excess carbs as energy, but if you are very disciplined, this diet can be quite effective....especially trainees that believe they are hardgainers and gain fat easily on conventional diets.

Again, hope I wasn't intruding on anybody's posts. GOOD LUCK with it and give it a try!


Many thanks for the input `Coach`. Yes I agree regarding the water retention during the carb loading phase.
I personally dont like the weekend eating & dont binge , but instead simply eat a `clean` high carb intake. But by Sat evening/Sun morning I look very bloated and heavy and already looking forward to abstinence from carbs. By Tuesday Im back to a more defined appearance.

TBH I often wonder ( as someone alluded to in another thread ) if I would fare better by simply taking in a very high carb meal post workout rather than over 2 days.

T.

Thanks T.,
I had a lot of experience with the diet. Like you, I didn't care for the bloat after 2 days of carbs or the tiredness. I switched to just a one day carb-up. I still had the tiredness and bloat. I finally settled on just an evening carb-up on Wednesdays and Saturdays. This addressed the tiredness and the water retention issues in my case.

In all honesty, this was the most amazing diet I had ever followed. You can tailor it or modify it as you see fit. I even went 50gms of carbs for months on end without a carb-up. That was a disaster when re-introducing carbs. Just play with it a bit, and you will figure out what is best for you.

Coach,

Do you mind giving n example of Wednesday Saturday carb-up. What would go into those meals?

Albert


It was never specific. It could lasagna, pizza, etc. Depending on my goal at the time, my calories varied from 2500-3000 during a cut, to 3500 to 5000 when trying to gain. What this diet did was allow me to eat enough calories to support/improve growth and strength without bloating or gaining too much fat. Like any diet or training program, I feel it is best to start off conservative, then make small changes as you tailor it to your specific goals and needs. The things I remember most were:
1) It allowed me to be at my heaviest bodyweight, while still remaining lean (visible abs)
2) Strength was at my highest
3) Energy level extremely high
4) Slept like a baby
5) This may not be appropriate, but bowel movements needed very little toilet paper

There were some cons:
1) You had too stay disciplined on the diet;NO CHEATING until designated times
2) Very tired on high carb days; The reason I modified it
3)Sometimes you just get sick of not eating what you want; This is where your values and priorities will determine success with it
4) Coming off the diet, you will retain a lot of water; This can be controlled somewhat, but you will go thru a period of bloating.

Hope this helps Albert or anyone else interested.
Open User Options Menu

db144

That's it SB, keep using Google search as if you know what your talking about. Mr. Skin and Bones.

d
Open User Options Menu

southbeach

db144 wrote:
That's it SB, keep using Google search as if you know what your talking about. Mr. Skin and Bones.

d


All BONE.

that's what SHE said! lol

Open User Options Menu

HeavyHitter32

southbeach wrote:
db144 wrote:
That's it SB, keep using Google search as if you know what your talking about. Mr. Skin and Bones.

d

All BONE.

that's what SHE said! lol



That wine must be hitting you hard tonight, but I guess a day of nothing but salads and a cup of bean soup will do that especially being such a light weight?
Open User Options Menu

simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

marcrph wrote:
I predict statin drugs will be gone in 20 years.


What do you think will replace them?
Open User Options Menu

overfiftylifter

Cholesterol may not be the problem, in fact it may be a help. http://huffinesinstitute.org/...-a-m-university
Open User Options Menu

fbcoach

overfiftylifter wrote:
Cholesterol may not be the problem, in fact it may be a help. http://huffinesinstitute.org/...versity


I've mentioned this here before. Cholesterol is obviously needed for hormones, but it is also the body's defense mechanism for leaking blood vessels. It's the symptom, not the root cause. Believe it or not, my Coaching mentor's cholesterol has been 1500ng/dcl blood for 30 years and no heart issues. Now, I would be quite concerned if it was me, but it makes you wonder what the complete picture really is.
Open User Options Menu

WesH

simon-hecubus wrote:
marcrph wrote:
I predict statin drugs will be gone in 20 years.

What do you think will replace them?


Beef.
Open User Options Menu

WesH

fbcoach wrote:
overfiftylifter wrote:
Cholesterol may not be the problem, in fact it may be a help. http://huffinesinstitute.org/...-a-m-university

I've mentioned this here before. Cholesterol is obviously needed for hormones, but it is also the body's defense mechanism for leaking blood vessels. It's the symptom, not the root cause. Believe it or not, my Coaching mentor's cholesterol has been 1500ng/dcl blood for 30 years and no heart issues. Now, I would be quite concerned if it was me, but it makes you wonder what the complete picture really is.


TC is a meaningless number. It's all about the HDL/triglyceride ratio.
Open User Options Menu

marcrph

North Carolina, USA

simon-hecubus wrote:
marcrph wrote:
I predict statin drugs will be gone in 20 years.

What do you think will replace them?


Science will tell
Open User Options Menu

gerry-hitman

Heart disease is NOT a build up of fat or cholesterol in the artery walls.

The plaque is a hard substance produced by the immune system to protect from inflammation.

The inflammation is caused by a number of factors, but mainly its cause by the WRONG kind of fat flowing in the blood.

partially hydrogenated is very bad and a KNOWN cause.

A diet LOW in fully saturated fat is also a known cause why?

Because the body REQUIRES fully saturated fat (cholesterol) for its survival.

When you remove this fat from your diet the body will PRODUCE ITS OWN from other nutrients.

The fully saturated fat produced by the body due to lack of it in the diet is KNOWN to cause inflammation.

This explains why those who have ignorantly removed saturated fat from the diet have high occurrence of heart disease

Open User Options Menu

HeavyHitter32

overfiftylifter wrote:
Cholesterol may not be the problem, in fact it may be a help. http://huffinesinstitute.org/...versity


VLDL and triglycerides are a far better way to look at the "bad stuff".
Open User Options Menu

HeavyHitter32

gerry-hitman wrote:
Heart disease is NOT a build up of fat or cholesterol in the artery walls.

The plaque is a hard substance produced by the immune system to protect from inflammation.

The inflammation is caused by a number of factors, but mainly its cause by the WRONG kind of fat flowing in the blood.

partially hydrogenated is very bad and a KNOWN cause.

A diet LOW in fully saturated fat is also a known cause why?

Because the body REQUIRES fully saturated fat (cholesterol) for its survival.

When you remove this fat from your diet the body will PRODUCE ITS OWN from other nutrients.

The fully saturated fat produced by the body due to lack of it in the diet is KNOWN to cause inflammation.

This explains why those who have ignorantly removed saturated fat from the diet have high occurrence of heart disease



Add processed sugar to the known cause list.
Open User Options Menu

HeavyHitter32

fbcoach wrote:
overfiftylifter wrote:
Cholesterol may not be the problem, in fact it may be a help. http://huffinesinstitute.org/...-a-m-university

I've mentioned this here before. Cholesterol is obviously needed for hormones, but it is also the body's defense mechanism for leaking blood vessels. It's the symptom, not the root cause. Believe it or not, my Coaching mentor's cholesterol has been 1500ng/dcl blood for 30 years and no heart issues. Now, I would be quite concerned if it was me, but it makes you wonder what the complete picture really is.


When my father had his heart attack 35 yrs ago, his cholesterol was only around 160, but his triglycerides were around 400!!
Open User Options Menu

gerry-hitman

Heart disease and cancer treatment is BIG business, multi-billion.

"if you want to know the CAUSE of the problem...follow the MONEY". Never a truer statement has been made.

If the drug/medical establishment where to bring the truth out to the mainstream media, in the area of PREVENTION of these, BILLIONS would be lost!

There is no money to be made in prevention...there is LITTLE money to be made in CURE, there is HUGE money to be made in treatment.

Its is very hard for the masses to accept the notion that the establishment would pass out false information in the area of prevention for the purpose of INCREASING DEMAND for treatment.

However if one will look at the numbers and "follow the money", this concept is not only possible, but in fact VERY LIKELY.

The good news however is..."the truth is out there", yes you need to look harder for it, and basically question everything mainstream, but the benefits for doing so are great.
Open User Options Menu
First | Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | Next | Last
Administrators Online: Mod Jump'n Jack, Ellington Darden
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy