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Perhaps Don't Yank the Yolk
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overfiftylifter

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/...pubmed/23021013
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southbeach

What's the conclusion...that additional dietary cholesterol and sat fat improves lipids? We know that complete BS already from nutritional science.

If it sounds too goood to be true... well :)

You need to know which to ignore and which to embrace.

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Hitit

southbeach wrote:
What's the conclusion...that additional dietary cholesterol and sat fat improves lipids? We know that complete BS already from nutritional science.

If it sounds too goood to be true... well :)

You need to know which to ignore and which to embrace.



Why? Ignoring you never works...
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southbeach

Hitit wrote:
southbeach wrote:
What's the conclusion...that additional dietary cholesterol and sat fat improves lipids? We know that complete BS already from nutritional science.

If it sounds too goood to be true... well :)

You need to know which to ignore and which to embrace.



Why? Ignoring you never works...


You love me man you know you do :)

Have we forgotten this so soon?

http://articles.nydailynews.co...
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HeavyHitter32

southbeach wrote:
What's the conclusion...that additional dietary cholesterol and sat fat improves lipids? We know that complete BS already from nutritional science.

If it sounds too goood to be true... well :)

You need to know which to ignore and which to embrace.



You are too stupid to realize that certain fats can and do actually raise HDL and this has been documented with egg yolks. No, this does not mean you should eat 200 eggs a day before you make a similar dumbass example as you always do. Again, moderation is key, but your brain cannot grasp the concept of moderation for whatever reason or the concept of "well balanced."
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Tony Williams

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
southbeach wrote:
What's the conclusion...that additional dietary cholesterol and sat fat improves lipids? We know that complete BS already from nutritional science.

If it sounds too goood to be true... well :)

You need to know which to ignore and which to embrace.



You are too stupid to realize that certain fats can and do actually raise HDL and this has been documented with egg yolks. No, this does not mean you should eat 200 eggs a day before you make a similar dumbass example as you always do. Again, moderation is key, but your brain cannot grasp the concept of moderation for whatever reason or the concept of "well balanced."


The new study's findings do dovetail with large studies by other groups having no industrial financing. For instance, in 1999, Frank B. Hu of the Harvard School of Public Health and his colleagues reported no increased risk of coronary heart disease or stroke in men or women who ate more than one egg per day. The analysis compared diet and cardiovascular risk among nearly 38,000 participants of two long-running epidemiologic studies.

A Michigan State University analysis, reported a year later, analyzed the diets and blood-cholesterol data for more than 27,000 people -- representative cross-section of the U.S. population. It found that cholesterol was lower in people who ate more than four eggs per week than among people who eschewed eggs. However, the researchers cautioned, "this study should not be used as a basis for recommending higher egg consumption for regulation of serum cholesterol."

Tony

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farhad

Massachusetts, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
southbeach wrote:
What's the conclusion...that additional dietary cholesterol and sat fat improves lipids? We know that complete BS already from nutritional science.

If it sounds too goood to be true... well :)

You need to know which to ignore and which to embrace.



You are too stupid to realize that certain fats can and do actually raise HDL and this has been documented with egg yolks. No, this does not mean you should eat 200 eggs a day before you make a similar dumbass example as you always do. Again, moderation is key, but your brain cannot grasp the concept of moderation for whatever reason or the concept of "well balanced."


I gave up on him months ago when this issue was discussed. No use, don't waste your time or energy on your key board.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

==Scott==
I love my egg yokes. Nothings so good as toast dipped in sunny side egg yoke!
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Hitit wrote:
southbeach wrote:
What's the conclusion...that additional dietary cholesterol and sat fat improves lipids? We know that complete BS already from nutritional science.

If it sounds too goood to be true... well :)

You need to know which to ignore and which to embrace.



Why? Ignoring you never works...


==Scott==
No, nothing does with captain carrot.
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southbeach

entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
I love my egg yokes. Nothings so good as toast dipped in sunny side egg yoke!


Everyone loves 6 eggs over easy, 1/2 lb bacon and 4 slices toast ...BUTTERED.

The question is good for you?

we both know answer to that question. ;)

even most eat hard (die early) PALEO guy knows that answer. eat hard haha
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

southbeach wrote:
entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
I love my egg yokes. Nothings so good as toast dipped in sunny side egg yoke!

Everyone loves 6 eggs over easy, 1/2 lb bacon and 4 slices toast ...BUTTERED.

The question is good for you?

we both know answer to that question. ;)

even most eat hard (die early) PALEO guy knows that answer. eat hard haha


==Scott==
Who said anything about 6 eggs and a 1/2 pound of bacon etc? To that I could say what about those 10 bottles of wine you had for dinner? Not everything you eat has to be on the super healthy list. Sometimes you just eat things because they taste good. Like you and your wine. It's not exactly healthy but you drink it anyway.
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BennyAnthonyOfKC

Missouri, USA

EGGS are very high in CHOLINE that is not only being required by the government to be in baby-formula, ENSURE includes it, which is marketed to the elderly. CHOLINE is not only important for the health of the brain, it is also good for the liver. LECITHIN PILLS, made from soy, are also an option for those allergic, or object, to EGGS; but, what is to be done when one is allergic to soy? EAT EGGS! :)
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PaulWebber

Speaking of the Harvard School or Public Health. Check this out:
The Protein Package
Nutrition In-Depth

What Is Protein?

Protein is found throughout the body?in muscle, bone, skin, hair, and virtually every other body part or tissue. It makes up the enzymes that power many chemical reactions and the hemoglobin that carries oxygen in your blood. At least 10,000 different proteins make you what you are and keep you that way.

Twenty or so basic building blocks, called amino acids, provide the raw material for all proteins. Following genetic instructions, the body strings together amino acids. Some genes call for short chains of amino acids, others are blueprints for long chains that fold, origami-like, into intricate, three-dimensional structures.

Because the body doesn't store amino acids, as it does fats or carbohydrates, it needs a daily supply of amino acids to make new protein.

Animal protein and vegetable protein probably have the same effects on health. It's the protein package that's likely to make a difference.

A 6-ounce broiled porterhouse steak is a great source of complete protein?about 40 grams worth. But it also delivers about 38 grams of fat, 14 of them saturated. (2) That's more than 60 percent of the recommended daily intake for saturated fat. The same amount of salmon gives you 34 grams of protein and 18 grams of fat, 4 of them saturated. (2) A cup of cooked lentils has 18 grams of protein, but under 1 gram of fat. (2)

The bottom line is that it's important to pay attention to what comes along with the protein in your food choices. Vegetable sources of protein, such as beans, nuts, and whole grains, are excellent choices, and they offer healthy fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Nuts are also a great source of healthy fat.

The best animal protein choices are fish and poultry. If you are partial to red meat, such as beef, pork, or lamb, stick with the leanest cuts, choose moderate portion sizes, and make it only an occasional part of your diet, for several reasons: Research suggests that people who eat even modest amounts of red meat have a higher risk of developing colon cancer, heart disease, and diabetes, and a higher risk of dying from heart disease, cancer, or any cause. (3?7) There's also substantial evidence that replacing red meat with fish, poultry, beans, or nuts, could help prevent heart disease and diabetes?and could lower the risk of early death. So make red meat (beef, pork, lamb) only an occasional part of your diet?no more than two 3-ounce servings a week?if you eat it at all. And skip the processed stuff?bacon, hot dogs, and deli meats?since that's linked even more strongly to cancer, heart disease, and diabetes risk. (Processed meats are very high in sodium, which may be one reason why they are associated with higher disease risks. Learn more about why cutting salt and sodium is good for your health, and learn what you can do to lower your risk of type 2 diabetes.)
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PaulWebber

entsminger wrote:
southbeach wrote:
entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
I love my egg yokes. Nothings so good as toast dipped in sunny side egg yoke!

Everyone loves 6 eggs over easy, 1/2 lb bacon and 4 slices toast ...BUTTERED.

The question is good for you?

we both know answer to that question. ;)

even most eat hard (die early) PALEO guy knows that answer. eat hard haha


==Scott==
Who said anything about 6 eggs and a 1/2 pound of bacon etc? To that I could say what about those 10 bottles of wine you had for dinner? Not everything you eat has to be on the super healthy list. Sometimes you just eat things because they taste good. Like you and your wine. It's not exactly healthy but you drink it anyway.


1 to 2 glasses daily is recommended for good health per numerous studies.

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PaulWebber

Summary

Choline is found in a wide range of plant foods in small amounts. Eating a well-balanced vegan diet with plenty of whole foods should ensure you are getting enough choline. Soymilk, tofu, quinoa, and broccoli are particularly rich sources.

The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) for choline is 550 mg/day for men and 425 mg/day for women. It is based on only one study comparing those amounts to 50 mg/day, with no intermediary amounts examined. Eating less than 50 mg/day can result in liver damage, but it is very unlikely that a vegan would have such a low intake.

Some people have genetic mutations that increase the need for choline; it is not clear how much choline such people need but the DRI is probably adequate for almost everyone. If you suspect any sort of liver dysfunction, it might be worth talking to your physician about boosting your choline intake or supplementing with it in moderate amounts.

The data on choline and chronic disease (cardiovascular disease, dementia, and cancer) is somewhat mixed. Ideal amounts appear to be about 300 mg per day. Most vegans probably get about that much from the foods they eat.

Vegan women who are considering getting pregnant should make sure they are meeting the DRI for choline to reduce the risk of neural tube defects, and might need a modest supplement.
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FiremanBob

I have learned that it's always a good policy to ignore southbeach.
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southbeach

PaulWebber wrote:
Speaking of the Harvard School or Public Health. Check this out:
The Protein Package
Nutrition In-Depth

What Is Protein?

Protein is found throughout the body?in muscle, bone, skin, hair, and virtually every other body part or tissue. It makes up the enzymes that power many chemical reactions and the hemoglobin that carries oxygen in your blood. At least 10,000 different proteins make you what you are and keep you that way.

Twenty or so basic building blocks, called amino acids, provide the raw material for all proteins. Following genetic instructions, the body strings together amino acids. Some genes call for short chains of amino acids, others are blueprints for long chains that fold, origami-like, into intricate, three-dimensional structures.

Because the body doesn't store amino acids, as it does fats or carbohydrates, it needs a daily supply of amino acids to make new protein.

Animal protein and vegetable protein probably have the same effects on health. It's the protein package that's likely to make a difference.

A 6-ounce broiled porterhouse steak is a great source of complete protein?about 40 grams worth. But it also delivers about 38 grams of fat, 14 of them saturated. (2) That's more than 60 percent of the recommended daily intake for saturated fat. The same amount of salmon gives you 34 grams of protein and 18 grams of fat, 4 of them saturated. (2) A cup of cooked lentils has 18 grams of protein, but under 1 gram of fat. (2)

The bottom line is that it's important to pay attention to what comes along with the protein in your food choices. Vegetable sources of protein, such as beans, nuts, and whole grains, are excellent choices, and they offer healthy fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Nuts are also a great source of healthy fat.

The best animal protein choices are fish and poultry. If you are partial to red meat, such as beef, pork, or lamb, stick with the leanest cuts, choose moderate portion sizes, and make it only an occasional part of your diet, for several reasons: Research suggests that people who eat even modest amounts of red meat have a higher risk of developing colon cancer, heart disease, and diabetes, and a higher risk of dying from heart disease, cancer, or any cause. (3?7) There's also substantial evidence that replacing red meat with fish, poultry, beans, or nuts, could help prevent heart disease and diabetes?and could lower the risk of early death. So make red meat (beef, pork, lamb) only an occasional part of your diet?no more than two 3-ounce servings a week?if you eat it at all. And skip the processed stuff?bacon, hot dogs, and deli meats?since that's linked even more strongly to cancer, heart disease, and diabetes risk. (Processed meats are very high in sodium, which may be one reason why they are associated with higher disease risks. Learn more about why cutting salt and sodium is good for your health, and learn what you can do to lower your risk of type 2 diabetes.)


Good post paul!
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southbeach

Americans tend to have ridiculously high ratios of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids in our blood -- we eat lots of eggs, chicken, and nuts and far fewer amounts of fish (this study didn't look at the effects of omega-3 from plant sources).

Esp the hardcore PALEO crowds' ratios are way way off.

http://www.theatlantic.com/...-aging/263219/#
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HeavyHitter32

southbeach wrote:
Americans tend to have ridiculously high ratios of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids in our blood -- we eat lots of eggs, chicken, and nuts and far fewer amounts of fish (this study didn't look at the effects of omega-3 from plant sources).

Esp the hardcore PALEO crowds' ratios are way way off.

http://www.theatlantic.com/...63219/#


Depending on the egg (they are not all equal - pasture fed - for example), they can be a good source of Omega 3 as are nuts such as walnuts. Again, you're full of shit and not telling the full story as grass fed makes a difference in this but you deliberately ALWAYS try to misinform from your complete lack of character.
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natemason5

Ontario, CAN

southbeach wrote:
Everyone loves 6 eggs over easy, 1/2 lb bacon and 4 slices toast ...BUTTERED.

The question is good for you?

we both know answer to that question. ;)

even most eat hard (die early) PALEO guy knows that answer. eat hard haha


Replace the toast with veggies, and you might be going in the right direction!
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southbeach

natemason5 wrote:
southbeach wrote:
Everyone loves 6 eggs over easy, 1/2 lb bacon and 4 slices toast ...BUTTERED.

The question is good for you?

we both know answer to that question. ;)

even most eat hard (die early) PALEO guy knows that answer. eat hard haha


Replace the toast with veggies, and you might be going in the right direction!


yep the whole grains are killers. better yet replace veggies with another stick of better and half dozen eggs? nothing succeeds like excess ;)
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PaulWebber

Check out the attached picture - interesting!

Robert Young shared Ph Miracle's photo.
September 19
Before eating an egg consider the following:
1) An egg is for producing a new chick.
2) An egg is a chickens period.
3) An egg is highly acidic and toxic to the blood and tissues.
4) An egg when cracked creates over 38 million pathological
microorganisms that are harmful to the body.
5) Eating an egg will pollute the blood and tissues with excess bacteria and yeast.
6) The ingestion of an egg will immediately activate the white blood cells.
7) An egg is one of my top ten toxic acidic foods to never eat.
So when you eat an egg think about what you are really eating
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SB2006

http://www.quackwatch.org/...Ind/young3.html
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PaulWebber

Is your breakfast omelet harming your heart? A recent study by researchers at Western University in Canada found that the more egg yolks people ate, the thicker their artery walls became ? an indicator of heart disease risk ? and that the effect was almost as bad as from smoking cigarettes.

In the study, the researchers measured carotid plaque build-up in the arteries of 1,231 men and women, average age 62, who were seeking care at cardiovascular-health clinics. Participants filled out questionnaires detailing lifestyle habits including medication use, cigarette smoking and egg-yolk consumption. The researchers gauged how much people smoked and how many egg yolks they ate over time, by calculating their ?pack-years? (the number of packs of cigarettes people smoked per day multiplied by the number of years they spent smoking) and ?egg-yolk years? (how many egg yolks they ate per week for how many years).

After about age 40, participants? plaque began building up steadily, but among the participants who ate the most eggs ? three or more yolks per week ? that build-up increased ?exponentially,? the study found. As people?s egg-yolk years went up, so did their plaque accumulation ? an association that was independent of factors like gender, cholesterol levels, blood pressure, smoking, body mass index and diabetes.

Read more: http://healthland.time.com/.../#ixzz28Wlo2WbP
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PaulWebber

The bozos that are that behind "quackwatch.com" were proven in court to have no credibility

http://www.physicsforums.com/...ad.php?t=237020

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