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SuperSlow No More!
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ATP 4 Vitality

Ken Hutchins seems to have moved on from SuperSlow. His new book has a chapter entitled; "Why Static Contraction is Better." Better? Better than SuperSlow?

http://ren-ex.com/...ontractions.pdf


Static contraction works well for the elderly, especially if one has experienced a cerebral accident where they lack motor control unilaterally.

I've seen static contractions work very well with stroke victims I have personally trained for years. I know they work well.

One thing that has surprised me about static contractions is the ability to modulate breathing with little difficulty. Static contractions make is much easier to breath at a slightly elevated cadence, thus preventing holding one's breath (Valsalva maneuver), therefore blood pressure does not spike.

There is little soreness with static contractions either in the muscles or joints.


These are THREE things that I have found that are great about static contractions.


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hit4me

Florida, USA

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
Ken Hutchins seems to have moved on from SuperSlow. His new book has a chapter entitled; "Why Static Contraction is Better." Better? Better than SuperSlow?

http://ren-ex.com/...ontractions.pdf


Static contraction works well for the elderly, especially if one has experienced a cerebral accident where they lack motor control unilaterally.

I've seen static contractions work very well with stroke victims I have personally trained for years. I know they work well.

One thing that has surprised me about static contractions is the ability to modulate breathing with little difficulty. Static contractions make is much easier to breath at a slightly elevated cadence, thus preventing holding one's breath (Valsalva maneuver), therefore blood pressure does not spike.

There is little soreness with static contractions either in the muscles or joints.


These are THREE things that I have found that are great about static contractions.




static contractions is nothing new, bruce lee was using static contractions along with other methods during his routines back in the sixties
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

===Scott===
The article mentioned was in the late 90s . Not exactly some new revelation by Hutchins? At least it?s an interesting picture of Sergio! You know, since there doesn?t seem to be much new interesting training talk on here worth reading I think I?d be happy to just see old pictures like this Sergio photo posted on a daily basis . I?m sure some of you guys have old photos of the greats or not so great we haven?t seen a million times sitting in some old photo album on your shelf that you could post!!
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hit4me

Florida, USA

entsminger wrote:
===Scott===
The article mentioned was in the late 90s . Not exactly some new revelation by Hutchins? At least it?s an interesting picture of Sergio! You know, since there doesn?t seem to be much new interesting training talk on here worth reading I think I?d be happy to just see old pictures like this Sergio photo posted on a daily basis . I?m sure some of you guys have old photos of the greats or not so great we haven?t seen a million times sitting in some old photo album on your shelf that you could post!!


i second that with the old pics...very inspirational

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Bastion

Sure, static training might be great for people recovering from a stroke or surgery or physically handicapped. For the rest of us I think they're next to useless unless done after reaching positive failure.
I pulled and tore abdominal muscles years ago doing heavy static chin holds ala Sisco and Little's early recommendations.
I have a friend who bought a static contraction machine from 1 rep gym years ago and has had it in his basement for at least a decade now and cant give the thing away.
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HeavyHitter32

I've always found "regular" full-range (non-timed) reps the best. Keep good form and control of the weight with a natural rhythm.
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Nwlifter

Bastion wrote:
Sure, static training might be great for people recovering from a stroke or surgery or physically handicapped. For the rest of us I think they're next to useless unless done after reaching positive failure.
I pulled and tore abdominal muscles years ago doing heavy static chin holds ala Sisco and Little's early recommendations.
I have a friend who bought a static contraction machine from 1 rep gym years ago and has had it in his basement for at least a decade now and cant give the thing away.


Agree completely!

Wow dang, tore an ab muscle, ouch!!!

Static machine.. wouldn't that be a wall? LOL
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tensionstrength

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
Ken Hutchins seems to have moved on from SuperSlow. His new book has a chapter entitled; "Why Static Contraction is Better." Better? Better than SuperSlow?

http://ren-ex.com/...ontractions.pdf


Static contraction works well for the elderly, especially if one has experienced a cerebral accident where they lack motor control unilaterally.

I've seen static contractions work very well with stroke victims I have personally trained for years. I know they work well.

One thing that has surprised me about static contractions is the ability to modulate breathing with little difficulty. Static contractions make is much easier to breath at a slightly elevated cadence, thus preventing holding one's breath (Valsalva maneuver), therefore blood pressure does not spike.

There is little soreness with static contractions either in the muscles or joints.


These are THREE things that I have found that are great about static contractions.



Do you do them and or have clients do them against a weight, or machine movement arm, or against an immovable object/movement arm?
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ATP 4 Vitality

Bastion wrote:
I think they're next to useless unless done after reaching positive failure.


Next to useless isometrics....

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tensionstrength

tensionstrength wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
Ken Hutchins seems to have moved on from SuperSlow. His new book has a chapter entitled; "Why Static Contraction is Better." Better? Better than SuperSlow?

http://ren-ex.com/...ontractions.pdf


Static contraction works well for the elderly, especially if one has experienced a cerebral accident where they lack motor control unilaterally.

I've seen static contractions work very well with stroke victims I have personally trained for years. I know they work well.

One thing that has surprised me about static contractions is the ability to modulate breathing with little difficulty. Static contractions make is much easier to breath at a slightly elevated cadence, thus preventing holding one's breath (Valsalva maneuver), therefore blood pressure does not spike.

There is little soreness with static contractions either in the muscles or joints.


These are THREE things that I have found that are great about static contractions.



Do you do them and or have clients do them against a weight, or machine movement arm, or against an immovable object/movement arm?


Actually I think you already answered this in the recent thread you started regarding speed, and at the beginning of and last comment on this thread.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

==Scott==
I get a kick out of forum goers who feel the need to bash other forms of exercise. If your on the HIT forum anything but HIT is bad, if on the CrossFit forum HIT sucks . Any form of exercise is better than no exercise. I still contend many on here get their best workout pushing keys on a key board and wouldn?t know a good workout if it HIT them in the face, ha ha.
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ATP 4 Vitality

tensionstrength wrote:

Do you do them and or have clients do them against a weight, or machine movement arm, or against an immovable object/movement arm?


The clients that I have trained use mainly 3 isometric exercises.

1) Nautilus double-chest decline press

2) Nautilus leverage leg press

3) Powertec pulldown


All isometrics done mid-range at about 2 minute duration.
1 set only...1x/week


Works every time.


I don't believe either Pete Sisco's or John Little's claims that much shorter isometric hold times give better results long term. Short duration isometrics are much harder to perform for the elderly and infirmed and pretty much everyone else.


I have experimented with many isometric holds.


1) Standing hip thrusts with very heavy resistance bands.

2) Gray Cook bar chest press chop iso with resistant bands with a lunge position

3) Nautilus mid range pullover iso

4) neck flexion and extension iso with RBs

5) Standing ab rollout iso with resistant band

6) upright row iso
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Jesse Lee Otis

How many of you remember the device in the attached picture ? Remember the name of it ?


Jesse Lee
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Ellington Darden

Jesse Lee Otis wrote:
How many of you remember the device in the attached picture ? Remember the name of it ?


Jesse Lee


It looks like an Exer-Genie.

Ellington

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Jesse Lee Otis

Ellington Darden wrote:
Jesse Lee Otis wrote:
How many of you remember the device in the attached picture ? Remember the name of it ?


Jesse Lee

It looks like an Exer-Genie.

Ellington



===============================

Dr. Ell --

Of course you would know. :-)

I got that pic off Ebay's site, although I had done a Google search for that term.

I remember using one of those things some years ago. I thought that I developed some strength from using it -- but my mind may have been playing tricks with me. Do you know if any good results came from use of those ?


Jesse Lee

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Ellington Darden

The Exer-Genie was friction based and provided positive-only work. The results were only minimal. But an exercise on the machine could also be performed with no movement, in an isometric manner.

Ellington
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Landau

Florida, USA

Before associating with Nautilus, Coach Bill Bradford used to sell Exer-Genies.
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Jesse Lee Otis

Ellington Darden wrote:
The Exer-Genie was friction based and provided positive-only work. The results were only minimal. But an exercise on the machine could also be performed with no movement, in an isometric manner.

Ellington


===================

Thanks for the info. Did you by chance ever meet a guy named Bill Bradford ? He lived in DeLand, FL and taught at DeLand High School in the 60's and 70's. Was a football coach there and later also a weightlifting coach there. He sold those things for a while and they had at least one at that high school.

Jesse Lee

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Jesse Lee Otis

Landau wrote:
Before associating with Nautilus, Coach Bill Bradford used to sell Exer-Genies.


==========================

Landau --

Did you know Bill Bradford?

Jesse Lee

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st3

In his latest book "Music and Dance", Ken Hutchins writes about Timed Static Contractions. He uses 3 phases
Stage 1 - Moderate effort
Stage 2 - Almost as hard as you dare
Stage 3 - As hard as you dare
He uses very little equipment with this protocol.
I find it interesting so I thought I'd apply it with some variation. I'm using wt to determine effort.
Using the pull down for example I'll put on 100 pounds (medium effort) and hold for 30 seconds - then I change to 120 (pretty hard) hold for 30 seconds - then to 140 (max effort) and hold for 30 seconds.
Very little localized muscular fatigue but major systemic fatigue. I did a full body so I felt like I got hit by a truck.

Steve
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Resultsbased

st3 wrote:
In his latest book "Music and Dance", Ken Hutchins writes about Timed Static Contractions. He uses 3 phases
Stage 1 - Moderate effort
Stage 2 - Almost as hard as you dare
Stage 3 - As hard as you dare
He uses very little equipment with this protocol.
I find it interesting so I thought I'd apply it with some variation. I'm using wt to determine effort.
Using the pull down for example I'll put on 100 pounds (medium effort) and hold for 30 seconds - then I change to 120 (pretty hard) hold for 30 seconds - then to 140 (max effort) and hold for 30 seconds.
Very little localized muscular fatigue but major systemic fatigue. I did a full body so I felt like I got hit by a truck.

Steve


I'm sure you are aware, but what you are doing isn't close to what he recommended in the book. You are doing static holds and he only recommends one SH in the entire book, with everything else being overcoming or TSC.

It would be interesting for someone to do this exclusively for 3 months and see how much size they lose.

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Landau

Florida, USA

Jesse Lee Otis wrote:
Landau wrote:
Before associating with Nautilus, Coach Bill Bradford used to sell Exer-Genies.

==========================

Landau --

Did you know Bill Bradford?

Jesse Lee



YES
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ATP 4 Vitality

Resultsbased wrote:


It would be interesting for someone to do this exclusively for 3 months and see how much size they lose.



Already done that
Well over 3 years with isometric holds
For neck flexion and extension
I sporadically train my neck with isometrics and utilize heavy resistance bands
22 inch neck shirts
Try and buy a 22-inch shirt size

I am now experimenting with long hold isometrics and Kaatsu bands for the occlusion effect


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Jesse Lee Otis

Landau wrote:
Jesse Lee Otis wrote:
Landau wrote:
Before associating with Nautilus, Coach Bill Bradford used to sell Exer-Genies.

==========================

Landau --

Did you know Bill Bradford?

Jesse Lee



YES


=================================

Neat. Was he still at DeLand High School when you were in contact with him? He was there for quite a few years, teaching World History and coaching their football team. When the school started a weightlifting team he was the coach (maybe he was instrumental in getting that team started).

Jesse Lee



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Jesse Lee Otis

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
Resultsbased wrote:


It would be interesting for someone to do this exclusively for 3 months and see how much size they lose.



Already done that
Well over 3 years with isometric holds
For neck flexion and extension
I sporadically train my neck with isometrics and utilize heavy resistance bands
22 inch neck shirts
Try and buy a 22-inch shirt size

I am now experimenting with long hold isometrics and Kaatsu bands for the occlusion effect




===========================

Wow! What a neck! Have you ever had problems from the neck flexion part of the isometric holds?

Jesse Lee


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