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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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hdlifter

The backwards way bodybuilding is promoted is criminal! Instead of the senseless and time weary; "more is better" or "advanced trainees need to continually do more as they advance" the opposite is the truth.

After 40 years of HIT, yeah long time, I continue to have some of the best workouts of my life. Why? Because I have a solid grasp of the fundamentals of HIT and learn how better to apply them with each passing year.

I couldn't care less my workouts take under 10 minutes, a majority of that sitting down (to avoid falling down) recovering between sets. Focusing on a select pool of exercises, the mass-builders which deliver the most "bang for my buck", progress is as natural as night following day.

Those who have been in the trenches for a lengthy period of time appreciate the importance of efficiency as one advances. Simplicity is the name of the game as we grow bigger and stronger. There's no iffs, buts or ands, that's just the way it is.
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Raider22

Ohio, USA

You are absolutely correct. my workouts are around 10 minutes. stimulate change and get out. I was a strength coach for 27 years and I have retired from my job in education. By trial and error I have found What works. I have 2 principles I have followed for many years. The law of irreducible minimums and The law of diminishing returns. Make things as simple as possible and no more.
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sirloin

I believe in a fairly minimalist seclection on basic lifts, and finding ways of making them harder and more intense i.e., deadstarts, EMOM reps, max static holds etc, however its now also my belief the body can handle a lot more than what we (in the HIT community) have been lead to believe.

I now believe (from my and others experience) in cycles/phases of BOTH "minimum effective dosage" AND "maximum recoverable volume", in doing so, ive gotten much stronger than years of "blink of an eye" HIT workouts performed once or twice per week.
I care less that my workouts can take over an hour to complete, i have the time and convenience of my own gym.

Imo, some have taken intensity, vol, freq wayyyy too far, some even claiming/boasting 35lb gains from training a few minutes every 3-6 months lol, anything worth having is worth working for, such people arent smart, their fucking lazy!
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

The backwards way bodybuilding is promoted is criminal! Instead of the senseless and time weary; "more is better" or "advanced trainees need to continually do more as they advance" the opposite is the truth.
==Scott==
I?m not sure where you are seeing all this more is better stuff?? Maybe years ago but I rarely see that now?
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hdlifter

entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
I?m not sure where you are seeing all this more is better stuff?? Maybe years ago but I rarely see that now?


I haven't seen, let alone worked in a commercial gym since the 90's, so I am unsure what is endorsed nowadays. What I see in articles, spewed all over the Net, it seems rationality remains a scarce commodity.

Funny how the longer we train, the simpler it gets...and should be.
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Turpin

I really couldn't care less what others approach to achieving progress is , provided their advocated approach has yielded results.

What IS refreshing is to read of those who have found THEIR optimal way and not just espousing another`s ideas as optimal when their results are not indicative of such.

T.
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hit4me

Florida, USA

entsminger wrote:
The backwards way bodybuilding is promoted is criminal! Instead of the senseless and time weary; "more is better" or "advanced trainees need to continually do more as they advance" the opposite is the truth.
==Scott==
I?m not sure where you are seeing all this more is better stuff?? Maybe years ago but I rarely see that now?


go to your local gym and you will still see the mentality of more is better
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too old

HDLifter, would care to elaborate on your routine? Seems lie you are continually getting results from very low volume training.

Curious about details:

What Exercise movements
Sets
Reps
% weights
Rest between sets
Warm up sets
Failure or reps left in tank
Days between workouts ( spit or fulbody)
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Resultsbased

Are there any examples of really well developed people who train just 10 minutes?

If you want the absolute worst program for bodybuilding, the consolidated approach by Mentzer is probably at the top of the list
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hit4me

Florida, USA

Resultsbased wrote:
Are there any examples of really well developed people who train just 10 minutes?

If you want the absolute worst program for bodybuilding, the consolidated approach by Mentzer is probably at the top of the list


why does it always have to be about really developed people or bodybuilding....why can't it be just for the average person
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Resultsbased

hit4me wrote:
Resultsbased wrote:
Are there any examples of really well developed people who train just 10 minutes?

If you want the absolute worst program for bodybuilding, the consolidated approach by Mentzer is probably at the top of the list

why does it always have to be about really developed people or bodybuilding....why can't it be just for the average person


Well, the original post seemed to be addressing bodybuilding as it mentioned the subject by name as well as advanced trainees...

Now, this person claims to be progressing and having their best workouts after 40 years - super!

But if you are going to criticize traditional, voluminous methods, the burden of proof is on the one making the claim or criticism - right??

So, again I'll ask, where are all of these great physical specimens spending just 10 minutes a week exercising? There's a reason bodybuilders train in the manner they train and if you want to look like you lift, you have to train in a given manner.

If 10 minute routines are what people prefer I have no problem with that, but I do object to the horse crap sales tactics of training in a minimalist manner and expecting to MAXIMIZE one's potential.

Mentzer comes to mind and it sounds like BBS/McGuff is changing his tune, albeit after many books were sold...
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hit4me

Florida, USA

Resultsbased wrote:
hit4me wrote:
Resultsbased wrote:
Are there any examples of really well developed people who train just 10 minutes?

If you want the absolute worst program for bodybuilding, the consolidated approach by Mentzer is probably at the top of the list

why does it always have to be about really developed people or bodybuilding....why can't it be just for the average person

Well, the original post seemed to be addressing bodybuilding as it mentioned the subject by name as well as advanced trainees...

Now, this person claims to be progressing and having their best workouts after 40 years - super!

But if you are going to criticize traditional, voluminous methods, the burden of proof is on the one making the claim or criticism - right??

So, again I'll ask, where are all of these great physical specimens spending just 10 minutes a week exercising? There's a reason bodybuilders train in the manner they train and if you want to look like you lift, you have to train in a given manner.

If 10 minute routines are what people prefer I have no problem with that, but I do object to the horse crap sales tactics of training in a minimalist manner and expecting to MAXIMIZE one's potential.

Mentzer comes to mind and it sounds like BBS/McGuff is changing his tune, albeit after many books were sold...


i agree, if you are promoting bodybuilding or even powerlifting....then 10 minutes or 30 minutes a week or even one hour per week is hogwash...
Mentzer did not train that way in his prime, as a matter of fact i heard that during the olympia he trained full body 3x/week.....in his later non-training days he was promoting very infrequent training, which i have learned is also hogwash

i stand corrected on your meaning, sorry about that
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Bastion

Resultsbased wrote:
Are there any examples of really well developed people who train just 10 minutes?

If you want the absolute worst program for bodybuilding, the consolidated approach by Mentzer is probably at the top of the list


Heavy Duty 2 was an awful experience for me. Makes perfect sense in theory, on paper. I found, and have found many times over the years that once I go past 7-9 days of not training a bodypart, I regress in both strength and size. Yet Heavy Duty 1 split was one of my most successful routines ever.
There are natural bodybuilders like John Heart and Chad shaw who can gain while training each bodypart every 2-4 weeks, which I've never been able to wrap my head around. Neither of them carry any bodyfat, which I think makes somewhat of a difference.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

hit4me wrote:
entsminger wrote:
The backwards way bodybuilding is promoted is criminal! Instead of the senseless and time weary; "more is better" or "advanced trainees need to continually do more as they advance" the opposite is the truth.
==Scott==
I?m not sure where you are seeing all this more is better stuff?? Maybe years ago but I rarely see that now?

go to your local gym and you will still see the mentality of more is better


==Scott==
Just like 90% of the guys on here I wouldn?t base anything on what you see at local gyms. That?s like going to the local bar and saying , well these guys said........
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cokerat

Brian Johnston?s right. Why is it always one extreme or the other? It?s either 10 mins once every 7-9 days or 2 hours everyday. What?s wrong with 10 mins every day or somewhere else in the middle ??
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Crotalus

sirloin wrote:
I believe in a fairly minimalist seclection on basic lifts, and finding ways of making them harder and more intense i.e., deadstarts, EMOM reps, max static holds etc, however its now also my belief the body can handle a lot more than what we (in the HIT community) have been lead to believe.

I now believe (from my and others experience) in cycles/phases of BOTH "minimum effective dosage" AND "maximum recoverable volume", in doing so, ive gotten much stronger than years of "blink of an eye" HIT workouts performed once or twice per week.
I care less that my workouts can take over an hour to complete, i have the time and convenience of my own gym.

Imo, some have taken intensity, vol, freq wayyyy too far, some even claiming/boasting 35lb gains from training a few minutes every 3-6 months lol, anything worth having is worth working for, such people arent smart, their fucking lazy!


I agree with everything you say here.

I followed the 'classic HIT' thing for too long but certainly did benefit from it early on, especially with learning how to train hard. I was just so dedicated to the ways preached by my HIT gurus that I wouldn't allow myself to listen to anything outside of what was HIT ... even when progress came to a halt for a long time.

Dr. Ken would always preach that all you'll need to do is be progressive on a handful of basic exercises.?

But the problem is how long are you going to continue to progress before you hit the wall that doesn't budge ? You reduce volume, you reduce frequency yet your progress is still shit.

I finally broke out of that way of thinking ... non-thinking would be a better term ... and used those HIT concepts as training guidelines and not as hard rules.

Like another guy just posted, it doesn't have to be one extreme or the other. Most likely the best way for most of us will be somewhere in the middle.

I wish to hell I learned that lesson years sooner than I did.
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Bastion

entsminger wrote:
The backwards way bodybuilding is promoted is criminal! Instead of the senseless and time weary; "more is better" or "advanced trainees need to continually do more as they advance" the opposite is the truth.
==Scott==
I?m not sure where you are seeing all this more is better stuff?? Maybe years ago but I rarely see that now?


I don't follow much of it. But from what I do see, the majority are into full body or upper-lower splits at a higher frequency. What I've used since the 90"s is now referred to as a "bro split" . 3 or 4 way split , covering the body in 5-7 days. To train high frequency, you really have to back off the throttle, as compared to what most hit trainees are used too.
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Brian Johnston

Ontario, CAN

Volume, frequency, and even the intensity of effort (per set for the body part) is very much an individual matter. It takes me 10-12 minutes to train a body part 'effectively' relative to my appearance and development (that's once a week). If a person can do a full body in 10 minutes, give or take, more power to that person. If a person can achieve the best results on full body as opposed to a split routine, kudos! That means the person has found what works for him or her. However, I've yet to see a natural trainee look like s/he bodybuilds on very brief workouts... there has to be 'enough' work for the muscle, which means holding off and coaxing that muscle until it is time to finish it off... that is what differentiates bodybuilding from just strength training. For some reason I never see photos of those who claim others are doing too much and that they need to embrace a very brief routine (usually they are fat). Even Dr. Darden knows the value of specialization and upping the overall demands in order to optimize development.
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ron33

Resultsbased wrote:
Are there any examples of really well developed people who train just 10 minutes?

If you want the absolute worst program for bodybuilding, the consolidated approach by Mentzer is probably at the top of the list


While my training is done for health not BBing , I used that routine with some modifications doing 3 sets as a circuit and every couple days , it worked pretty good for getting back into training from illness . Just the basics . I talked to Mentzer several times, and he told me try to find what works best for u , and he did more sets when trying to get back into training then cut down as his intensity went up ...
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sirloin

cokerat wrote:
Brian Johnston?s right. Why is it always one extreme or the other? It?s either 10 mins once every 7-9 days or 2 hours everyday. What?s wrong with 10 mins every day or somewhere else in the middle ??


The middle was a good starting point for me, but as time has went on ive found going from one "extreme" to the other was required to take me to the next stage/level. Maintenance phases followed by over reaching phases, and on rare occasions, something severe like a 5 second max trap bar static hold.

Am 40 now, perhaps if am still around and training in 10-20 years from now the middle may be wheres its at for me, eventually one day ill wake up and wont be able to lift more weight, then it'll be about maintaining my strength and gains.
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Tridentine

what works better for me at age 52, is 25 minutes twice per week with another 30 minutes on the stationary whilst I pray the rosary.

I do all of legs in one workout and either neck,back, chest in another and arms in the other week.

I used to do 1.5 hours 4 times per week in my teens 20s and 30s but this provided a slow muscular gain.
now the 1.5 hrs per week keeps me pumped and tight.
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hit4me

Florida, USA

sirloin wrote:
cokerat wrote:
Brian Johnston?s right. Why is it always one extreme or the other? It?s either 10 mins once every 7-9 days or 2 hours everyday. What?s wrong with 10 mins every day or somewhere else in the middle ??

The middle was a good starting point for me, but as time has went on ive found going from one "extreme" to the other was required to take me to the next stage/level. Maintenance phases followed by over reaching phases, and on rare occasions, something severe like a 5 second max trap bar static hold.

Am 40 now, perhaps if am still around and training in 10-20 years from now the middle may be wheres its at for me, eventually one day ill wake up and wont be able to lift more weight, then it'll be about maintaining my strength and gains.


have you ever tried the strong 5x5 program.....squats/bench presses/deadlifts 3 days per week...was curious what your thoughts were
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MDieguez

Dick Conner wrote a few articles in the old Hardgainer magazine that featured a few different guys that trained in a very abbreviated fashion. Vince Vaught at age 47 and good enough to win local BB contests, trained twice a week. One upper body day and one lower body day. Each w/o contained about 5 sets total. The routine was predominantly compound movements. An example upper body day was 2 sets of bench, 2 sets of weighted pull ups and one set of thick bar curls. There was another guy coming back from hip replacement in his late 30's who also trained 2x/wk. He had an upper body day and a lower body day. One set to failure done very slowly for 5-6 exercises each day. The guy looked great. Dick Conner is a gem.
Mike
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CD51

hit4me wrote:
sirloin wrote:

have you ever tried the strong 5x5 program.....squats/bench presses/deadlifts 3 days per week...was curious what your thoughts were


Strong Lifts is a linear progression setup, not a lot different than Starting Strength or other similar ones. The issue is, that like HIT, at some point you progress to where you can no longer sustain linear gains then you need to do something different.
The traditional HIT answer is to add more rest days. This too has its limitations and stops working, or at least is not optimal, at a point.
Through my experience I have come to believe that periodization is the answer. You have to cycle movements, intensity or both to keep progressing. Training becomes complex but it doesn?t have to become complicated. The principals of brief, hard training with adequate recovery remain. Work on the major lifts and alternate variations of them into you?re training. Deload, go NTF and gradually build back up to loads that cause failure in your target rep range.

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sirloin

hit4me wrote:
sirloin wrote:
cokerat wrote:
Brian Johnston?s right. Why is it always one extreme or the other? It?s either 10 mins once every 7-9 days or 2 hours everyday. What?s wrong with 10 mins every day or somewhere else in the middle ??

The middle was a good starting point for me, but as time has went on ive found going from one "extreme" to the other was required to take me to the next stage/level. Maintenance phases followed by over reaching phases, and on rare occasions, something severe like a 5 second max trap bar static hold.

Am 40 now, perhaps if am still around and training in 10-20 years from now the middle may be wheres its at for me, eventually one day ill wake up and wont be able to lift more weight, then it'll be about maintaining my strength and gains.

have you ever tried the strong 5x5 program.....squats/bench presses/deadlifts 3 days per week...was curious what your thoughts were


Ive never really tried those 5x5 methods Dan so i cant give an honest opinion, i prefer to operate closer to my one rep max on the big lifts, usually work up to a main work set of 3-5 reps or 10-15 high percentage EMOM reps. The latter has brought my 3 rep max paused bench up 10kg in the last month.

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