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Ellington Darden

Back in 2009 on this website I posted an article: "Strength Training for Kids," which you can review under the headline Training Routines and Other Articles.

The article connected to some details on my training of Tyler, my 7-year-old son. At that time Tyler was 4 feet 7 inches tall and weighed 90 pounds. And he was very strong for his age. The article talks about how often I trained Tyler and the various exercises I used.

Okay, almost 10 years have passed -- and I've continued to strength train Tyler. Most of that time, it was a chore to get him to train once a week. More usual was approximately once every 10 days.

Tyler, when he got into high school, was not interested in playing football, basketball, or baseball. In fact, he wasn't into sports at all. Mostly, he liked computer games.

When he started the 9th grade, he was attending a very large high school in Orlando and the school offered more than a dozen different sports. My wife and I told that he had to choose at least one sport and stay with it for at least a year.

He narrowed it down to wrestling and rowing . . . and finally picked rowing. In Florida, there are more than 60 high schools that have rowing teams that compete for the state championships. The main event in high school rowing is what's called sweep rowing with 8 in a boat. Four on each side with each person handing a long oar with both hands . . . and a small person in back calling out instructions.

Tyler jumped into rowing and thrived at this sport. He's now the strongest member of his team, which numbers more than 50 boys between 15 and 18 years of age. Last year his boat won second in the state championships.

Today, Tyler stands 6 feet 2 inches tall and weighs 194 pounds. I took the opening side chest photo of him last week.

I'm planning on using Tyler in my next bodybuilding book. Approximately two years ago, I started training Tyler with my 30-10-30 style, which will be a major part of the new book. In my home gym, I have five Nautilus Nitro machines and Tyler uses the entire weight stack for multiple repetitions on each machine. Once again, he's very strong.

Ellington
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Nwlifter

Wow time flies... in my mind he was still a kid... he sure has grown up! Very cool story, your book featuring hi will be great, looking forward to that!



Ellington Darden wrote:
Back in 2009 on this website I posted an article: "Strength Training for Kids," which you can review under the headline Training Routines and Other Articles.

The article connected to some details on my training of Tyler, my 7-year-old son. At that time Tyler was 4 feet 7 inches tall and weighed 90 pounds. And he was very strong for his age. The article talks about how often I trained Tyler and the various exercises I used.

Okay, almost 10 years have passed -- and I've continued to strength train Tyler. Most of that time, it was a chore to get him to train once a week. More usual was approximately once every 10 days.

Tyler, when he got into high school, was not interested in playing football, basketball, or baseball. In fact, he wasn't into sports at all. Mostly, he liked computer games.

When he started the 9th grade, he was attending a very large high school in Orlando and the school offered more than a dozen different sports. My wife and I told that he had to choose at least one sport and stay with it for at least a year.

He narrowed it down to wrestling and rowing . . . and finally picked rowing. In Florida, there are more than 60 high schools that have rowing teams that compete for the state championships. The main event in high school rowing is what's called sweep rowing with 8 in a boat. Four on each side with each person handing a long oar with both hands . . . and a small person in back calling out instructions.

Tyler jumped into rowing and thrived at this sport. He's now the strongest member of his team, which numbers more than 50 boys between 15 and 18 years of age. Last year his boat won second in the state championships.

Today, Tyler stands 6 feet 2 inches tall and weighs 194 pounds. I took the opening side chest photo of him last week.

I'm planning on using Tyler in my next bodybuilding book. Approximately two years ago, I started training Tyler with my 30-10-30 style, which will be a major part of the new book. In my home gym, I have five Nautilus Nitro machines and Tyler uses the entire weight stack for multiple repetitions on each machine. Once again, he's very strong.

Ellington


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ATP 4 Vitality

As arrows are in the hand of a mighty man; so are children of the youth.

Rowing is a beautiful sport and may be the most heart healthy sport of all.
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Turpin

A REAL CHIP OF THE OLD BLOCK .. SUPERB.


T.
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Brian A Schamber

Texas, USA

I certainly see where he got his genetic from. I would like to see the side by side comparisons with you back in the day. He could be a solid 210 plus once he gets to 18-19 years old.

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hit4me

Florida, USA

impressive, like father like son
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StuKE

Excellent stuff, he is doing well.
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Average Al

The apple does not fall far from the tree.

Rowing seems like a great sport - it requires both strength and endurance, and there isn't any impact damage on knees and hips. You just have to be careful about low back issues. His height should also work to his advantage.
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HeavyHitter32

Impressive stuff!

My how the time flies.
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Resultsbased

Really impressive!
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garethit

He?s in great shape! Must make you extremely proud.

How do you manage to balance his strength training with the rowing workouts? Any time I?ve read about rowing teams the workload they subject themselves to is extremely demanding.

Thanks
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hit4me

Florida, USA

Dr. Darden,

due to your son being the strongest or one of the strongest on the team, has the coach or the other students approach you for training advice or maybe be the strength coach for the team?
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dipsrule

Pennsylvania, USA

Really great results. Was 30-10-30 a change for 30-30-30 or a typo?

30-10-30 looks good because you could use a heavier weight with a 10 second positive.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

== Scott==
I chip off the old block!! Must make you very proud!
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

=Scott=
My son rowed in high school and college. He loved it. Now we have several shells . It?s one of the best exercises ever. You can get a great workout and be on the river at the same time !!
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Ellington Darden

hit4me wrote:
Dr. Darden,

due to your son being the strongest or one of the strongest on the team, has the coach or the other students approach you for training advice or maybe be the strength coach for the team?


His team has a strength-training coach and she does things in a traditional manner. Overtraining is a real problem for his entire team. As you can imagine, the coach does not agree 100% with my philosophy.

Ellington

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Ellington Darden

dipsrule wrote:
Really great results. Was 30-10-30 a change for 30-30-30 or a typo?

30-10-30 looks good because you could use a heavier weight with a 10 second positive.


30-10-30 stands for a 30-second negative, then 10 faster reps (1-second positives and 2-second negatives), and a final 30-second negative. It's my new method that I'm going to describe fully in my January 2019 book, "Men's Health Killing Fat."

Ellington

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hit4me

Florida, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
dipsrule wrote:
Really great results. Was 30-10-30 a change for 30-30-30 or a typo?

30-10-30 looks good because you could use a heavier weight with a 10 second positive.

30-10-30 stands for a 30-second negative, then 10 faster reps (1-second positives and 2-second negatives), and a final 30-second negative. It's my new method that I'm going to describe fully in my January 2019 book, "Men's Health Killing Fat."

Ellington



can't wait for this book, I feel like a little boy waiting for santa claus, lol
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
hit4me wrote:
Dr. Darden,

due to your son being the strongest or one of the strongest on the team, has the coach or the other students approach you for training advice or maybe be the strength coach for the team?

His team has a strength-training coach and she does things in a traditional manner. Overtraining is a real problem for his entire team. As you can imagine, the coach does not agree 100% with my philosophy.

Ellington



==Scott==
My son Dakotas coach was all for strength training except for squats. He?d seen to many rowers get hurt screwing around with squats and what happened ? Two of his best rowers kept trying them and both got hurt and were out for the season.
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sonny153

Interesting story, you can see the resemblance in how you're built, I really think when it comes to training or sports, if you really like something you do good at it
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Average Al

Ellington Darden wrote:
dipsrule wrote:
Really great results. Was 30-10-30 a change for 30-30-30 or a typo?

30-10-30 looks good because you could use a heavier weight with a 10 second positive.

30-10-30 stands for a 30-second negative, then 10 faster reps (1-second positives and 2-second negatives), and a final 30-second negative. It's my new method that I'm going to describe fully in my January 2019 book, "Men's Health Killing Fat."

Ellington



So that is quite a bit different than than in the last book on negative emphasized training. I'm curious as to what lead you in that direction (versus a single slow concentric for the 30-30-30 protocol)?
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robinn3403

Average Al wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
dipsrule wrote:
Really great results. Was 30-10-30 a change for 30-30-30 or a typo?

30-10-30 looks good because you could use a heavier weight with a 10 second positive.

30-10-30 stands for a 30-second negative, then 10 faster reps (1-second positives and 2-second negatives), and a final 30-second negative. It's my new method that I'm going to describe fully in my January 2019 book, "Men's Health Killing Fat."

Ellington



So that is quite a bit different than than in the last book on negative emphasized training. I'm curious as to what lead you in that direction (versus a single slow concentric for the 30-30-30 protocol)?


Dr. Darden, do your daughter's strength train as well?
Also, will you be doing anymore X-Force Studies or programs in the future? Would love to know how those folks that went through your progams on 2012 are doing!.
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Ellington Darden

Average Al wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
dipsrule wrote:
Really great results. Was 30-10-30 a change for 30-30-30 or a typo?

30-10-30 looks good because you could use a heavier weight with a 10 second positive.

30-10-30 stands for a 30-second negative, then 10 faster reps (1-second positives and 2-second negatives), and a final 30-second negative. It's my new method that I'm going to describe fully in my January 2019 book, "Men's Health Killing Fat."

Ellington



So that is quite a bit different than than in the last book on negative emphasized training. I'm curious as to what lead you in that direction (versus a single slow concentric for the 30-30-30 protocol)?


The why of that answer takes up a chapter in my new book. I don't want to get into that just yet. Sorry.

Ellington
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Ellington Darden

robinn3403 wrote:
Average Al wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
dipsrule wrote:
Really great results. Was 30-10-30 a change for 30-30-30 or a typo?

30-10-30 looks good because you could use a heavier weight with a 10 second positive.

30-10-30 stands for a 30-second negative, then 10 faster reps (1-second positives and 2-second negatives), and a final 30-second negative. It's my new method that I'm going to describe fully in my January 2019 book, "Men's Health Killing Fat."

Ellington



So that is quite a bit different than than in the last book on negative emphasized training. I'm curious as to what lead you in that direction (versus a single slow concentric for the 30-30-30 protocol)?

Dr. Darden, do your daughter's strength train as well?
Also, will you be doing anymore X-Force Studies or programs in the future? Would love to know how those folks that went through your progams on 2012 are doing!.


I have three daughters. Two of them, Sarah and Larah, do strength train.

Since 2012, Joe Cirulli at Gainesville Health & Fitness has had an ongoing X-Force program. Many of my original subjects still train on X-Force.

Ellington
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hit4me

Florida, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
hit4me wrote:
Dr. Darden,

due to your son being the strongest or one of the strongest on the team, has the coach or the other students approach you for training advice or maybe be the strength coach for the team?

His team has a strength-training coach and she does things in a traditional manner. Overtraining is a real problem for his entire team. As you can imagine, the coach does not agree 100% with my philosophy.

Ellington



too bad especially when the proof is right before her eyes
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