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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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ATP 4 Vitality

DuzHIT wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
DuzHIT wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
Average Al wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:

I read all of these posts, and the only angry, inflammatory, or uncivil posts are yours.

Wazzup?


Thank you for reading ALL of these posts. Could you perhaps site JUST ONE post of mine that is angry, or uncivil?

Take your pick, from the initial premise of this thread on. You inflame, infer, and personally criticize others whist alleging anger incivility, and inflamation amongst others who are merely taking a position against your beginning premise. You then deflect the arguement, citing studies and bringing in new arguements, none of which have any relevance.

When that inevitably fails, you act offended that others may call you out.

I think Freud called describing your own shortcomings in others as projection.

I don't need to cite squat. It's all there in black and gold.


That is the answer that I expected from you.
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ATP 4 Vitality

https://www.youtube.com/...9&v=IaAXowasstA

https://www.youtube.com/...h?v=IsiY5MTKQF8

https://www.bing.com/...E3&&FORM=VRDGAR

Joseph Curtis Hise had abbreviated routines based on his Cartilage Mass Theory. Heavy deep breathing is incorporated during the Hise Shrug, squats and pullovers. His style of exercise incorporated pullovers followed by squats to deepen the breathing box. Hise seen this type of training as anabolic to the extreme.

The Nautilus pullover is the BEST ever for stretching the rib cage, and uses no gripping at all.

The Nautilus neck and shoulder (which I do not own) can facilitate the Hise shrug without gripping.

Gripping exercises raise
blood pressure and decreases blood perfusion.

I have been using Dr Dardens 30/10/30 for a while, and I have been training some other trainees on this technique. This technique promotes deep breathing, especially the last crucial moments when muscular failure is being reached. I like this technique. Others find the technique easy to grasp. We use an IPhone stop watch timer for accurate timekeeping. The technique will demand more rest as the fatigue is greater. I find the middle 10 reps must be done until no further reps are possible, and the subsequent long slow 30 second concluding negative occurs as deep breathing is still possible. Thus the Valsalva maneuver is lessened to a large degree. All exercises can be post and pre-ceded with arterial compliant exercises. The resultant pulmonary increases from Hise-type exercise will help the wind, the most noticeable physical attribute to decrease in all of physical fitness.


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epdavis7

Marc just curious. What does a typical training week look like for you? Are you active above and beyond your training? What kind of diet philosophy do you adhere to? Do you take supplements?
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epdavis7

Did my regular HIT workout and did 30 10 30 on some dumbbell curls and lying tricep extensions. The pump is incredible. Some of that may be due to not having done direct exercises for my biceps and triceps in quite some time, but I also believe it to be due to the training modality. It was more like 25 9 20. It was hard to figure out what weight to use initially. I expect to be pleasantly sore tomorrow.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

== Scott ==
Not that anybody asked or cares but here?s my weekly routine . At least twice a week I do two or three sets to failure on about 6 or 7 Nautilus machines all upper body with about 30 seconds between sets. I also am still trying to do a chin so I try chins with no help and then do several negatives until I just fall. Some times dips. Work used to be real busy and I?d be bustling around all day but lately it?s pretty dead so now on off days I do 100 reps of body weight squats at my desk quickly followed up with 20 up and down about 15 stairs in the back of the building and then some sandbag leg extensions in my office.
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epdavis7

Scott,

If I read that correct you do 2-3 x 6-7 machines to failure. At the top end that would put you at 21 sets to failure for upper body only? Just trying to understand. If so, that would kill me. Keep trying with the chins. I'm not the strongest guy in the world weight wise but have always been able to rep out on things like chins and pushups. As a kid in PE and later in the military I always was able to max out the PT tests for calisthenics. Came pretty close for the run, but I've always been more of a middle to long distance runner. I must be primarily slow twitch muscle fiber.
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ATP 4 Vitality

epdavis7 wrote:
Marc just curious. What does a typical training week look like for you? Are you active above and beyond your training? What kind of diet philosophy do you adhere to? Do you take supplements?


Sorry,

I have no typical training week


I see several hundred patients weekly
I do lots of volunteer work
I spend weekly time on devotional activities
Help the elderly in my family
I train several for free in my gym
I love to cook
I am cooking100 wings for SB Sunday party
I volunteered to cook for several older men Wednesday for their luncheon

As you can see, I am Not too busy

Diet. I will try anything once

Supplements. I really like homemade ice cream
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epdavis7

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
epdavis7 wrote:
Marc just curious. What does a typical training week look like for you? Are you active above and beyond your training? What kind of diet philosophy do you adhere to? Do you take supplements?

Sorry,

I have no typical training week


I see several hundred patients weekly
I do lots of volunteer work
I spend weekly time on devotional activities
Help the elderly in my family
I train several for free in my gym
I love to cook
I am cooking100 wings for SB Sunday party
I volunteered to cook for several older men Wednesday for their luncheon

As you can see, I am Not too busy

Diet. I will try anything once

Supplements. I really like homemade ice cream


Its always good to volunteer. I volunteer to work with the homeless and disabled myself.

So you follow no set training routine? How do you gauge progress or the lack thereof?
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

epdavis7 wrote:
Scott,

If I read that correct you do 2-3 x 6-7 machines to failure. At the top end that would put you at 21 sets to failure for upper body only? Just trying to understand. If so, that would kill me. Keep trying with the chins. I'm not the strongest guy in the world weight wise but have always been able to rep out on things like chins and pushups. As a kid in PE and later in the military I always was able to max out the PT tests for calisthenics. Came pretty close for the run, but I've always been more of a middle to long distance runner. I must be primarily slow twitch muscle fiber.


== Scott==
I just suck at chins, always have. Great at pushups ( at least used to be) . I remember in PE in high school they had this sit up test. At that time I hardly ever did them but I joined the test just for kicks. The best kids in the class did about 250 so I started doing them and I kept going past 250 to around 500. The kids were pissed! I have no idea about my fibers? Maybe All Bran, ha ha
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ATP 4 Vitality

epdavis7 wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:
epdavis7 wrote:
Marc just curious. What does a typical training week look like for you? Are you active above and beyond your training? What kind of diet philosophy do you adhere to? Do you take supplements?

Sorry,

I have no typical training week


I see several hundred patients weekly
I do lots of volunteer work
I spend weekly time on devotional activities
Help the elderly in my family
I train several for free in my gym
I love to cook
I am cooking100 wings for SB Sunday party
I volunteered to cook for several older men Wednesday for their luncheon

As you can see, I am Not too busy

Diet. I will try anything once

Supplements. I really like homemade ice cream


Its always good to volunteer. I volunteer to work with the homeless and disabled myself.

So you follow no set training routine? How do you gauge progress or the lack thereof?



1) Omron Body Composition Monitor with Scale

2) Omron Blood pressure auto machine

3) One touch Glucose monitor

4) Spirometer

5) Cholesterol screening at work

6) progressive resistance training

Bottom Line:

If I get out of breath during exertions, I need to work on the cardio side of the fitness equation. The Ventilation Threshold 1 holds the key to cardiovascular conditioning IMO.

I do not believe eating fried Twinkies sitting on the couch does much in the way of producing fitness.
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epdavis7

I have a deep soreness in biceps and triceps from a go @ 30 10 30 yesterday.
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Keyser S?

Ellington Darden wrote:
Interestingly, I've fielded questions about strength training, bodybuilding, diet, and nutrition for more than 50 years. I've never had someone ask me "how to get healthy?"

Ellington


As far as I can recall, you've never claimed to know the answer. Instead focusing on measurable improvements in strength muscle-mass and body composition.

I think if that's the case it goes a long way to explaining why it's not a popular question for you. Although I would've expected it would happen now and again anyway.

I guess if you were interested in tapping this market more you could measure other risk factors for disease such as arterial health, heart rate recovery and glucose response, and see if they improve in the subjects.
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Keyser S?

entsminger wrote:

== Scott==
I just suck at chins, always have. Great at pushups ( at least used to be) . I remember in PE in high school they had this sit up test. At that time I hardly ever did them but I joined the test just for kicks. The best kids in the class did about 250 so I started doing them and I kept going past 250 to around 500. The kids were pissed! I have no idea about my fibers? Maybe All Bran, ha ha


Pain threshold I believe is the key in sets over 100, and possibly also using elastic energy, or flat out bouncing off the floor or a mat can help increase those numbers in the situp even more.
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epdavis7

entsminger wrote:
epdavis7 wrote:
Scott,

If I read that correct you do 2-3 x 6-7 machines to failure. At the top end that would put you at 21 sets to failure for upper body only? Just trying to understand. If so, that would kill me. Keep trying with the chins. I'm not the strongest guy in the world weight wise but have always been able to rep out on things like chins and pushups. As a kid in PE and later in the military I always was able to max out the PT tests for calisthenics. Came pretty close for the run, but I've always been more of a middle to long distance runner. I must be primarily slow twitch muscle fiber.

== Scott==
I just suck at chins, always have. Great at pushups ( at least used to be) . I remember in PE in high school they had this sit up test. At that time I hardly ever did them but I joined the test just for kicks. The best kids in the class did about 250 so I started doing them and I kept going past 250 to around 500. The kids were pissed! I have no idea about my fibers? Maybe All Bran, ha ha


I can do normal speed sit-ups and leg raises to the point of boredom.
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Crotalus

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:

2) Omron Blood pressure auto machine


A friend of mine just bought a BP monitor and believe it was an Omron. She told me she has had problems with it's accuracy ; compared it to her doctors and they were way off.

She said she bought this one because the reviews on it were the best .... 75% accuracy ! I couldn't believe anyone - especially the company selling it - could accept it being accurate only 75% of the time.

WTF ... I wouldn't by a wrist watch if they claimed it was right only 75% of the time yet they sell BP monitors with this piss poor track record. And if I'm correct, OMRON is supposed to be the best one.

Best part, to get it calibrated it has to be sent to England.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

==Scott==
If I recall correctly I had some deep fried Twinkees at the fair and I didn?t like them as much as the real thing . I think we need to get some serious studies going on this and how like How Wonder Bread Twinkees can build Bodies in 7 Ways !! Wasn?t it Reeves or Gironda who swore by Co Coa Puffs!! Ha ha
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HeavyHitter32

ATP 4 Vitality wrote:


I do not believe eating fried Twinkies sitting on the couch does much in the way of producing fitness.


I work with a 51-year-old guy who suffered a major heart attack a few months ago. He had gone into cardiac arrest and of course, required CPR to bring him back. The name of the major artery that was 100% blocked slips me, but it's on the left side of the heart and referred to as the widow maker. Lucky for him, he only required a stent and has recovered well.

However, he's in complete denial - still. He's 50 pounds over weight, has lost no weight, never has exercised, still eats crap (Pringles are his morning breakfast), and questions his doctors, all of the evidence of prevention, etc. His cholesterol was high when he had his heart attack and is now on a statin, but criticizes his doctor for putting him on it because of potential side effects. Yet at the same time I think he feels he can now eat whatever he wants because he's on the med. He debates me on many of the things discussed in this thread. Of course, if he did the right things he probably wouldn't even have to be on it.

I wouldn't doubt he's also eating fried Twinkies.

A lot of people just prefer to stick their head in the sand. Sad.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:


I do not believe eating fried Twinkies sitting on the couch does much in the way of producing fitness.


I work with a 51-year-old guy who suffered a major heart attack a few months ago. He had gone into cardiac arrest and of course, required CPR to bring him back. The name of the major artery that was 100% blocked slips me, but it's on the left side of the heart and referred to as the widow maker. Lucky for him, he only required a stent and has recovered well.

However, he's in complete denial - still. He's 50 pounds over weight, has lost no weight, never has exercised, still eats crap (Pringles are his morning breakfast), and questions his doctors, all of the evidence of prevention, etc. His cholesterol was high when he had his heart attack and is now on a statin, but criticizes his doctor for putting him on it because of potential side effects. Yet at the same time I think he feels he can now eat whatever he wants because he's on the med. He debates me on many of the things discussed in this thread. Of course, if he did the right things he probably wouldn't even have to be on it.

I wouldn't doubt he's also eating fried Twinkies.

A lot of people just prefer to stick their head in the sand. Sad.


==Scott==
I've talked about a co-worker who had a heart attack because a chunk of plaque came loose and blocked the heart just like your friend.It was the widow maker heart attack. After stints and all he came back ok. After this incident he went on what he calls a sticks and grass diet. No junk, just healthy stuff plus he is on statins etc. His cholesterol was around 200 plus off the pills and about 60 0n them. One month he had to stop the pills for some availability reason and off the pills his cholesterol went back up to well over 200 and he was still eating like a rabbit.
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epdavis7

Its kind of a crap shoot. My older brother (different father than me) had the widowmaker heart attack during a military PT test when he was 49. Luckily and thankfully he was surrounded by medical people and survived. He was healthy, fit and had no cholesterol, blood pressure, triglyceride, diabetes, obesity issues etc. Yes he did cardio all the time and strength trained also. Some things you can obviously control and some things its the roll of the dice.
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

epdavis7 wrote:
Its kind of a crap shoot. My older brother (different father than me) had the widowmaker heart attack during a military PT test when he was 49. Luckily and thankfully he was surrounded by medical people and survived. He was healthy, fit and had no cholesterol, blood pressure, triglyceride, diabetes, obesity issues etc. Yes he did cardio all the time and strength trained also. Some things you can obviously control and some things its the roll of the dice.


== Scott==
I guess that?s when like the guy who eats pringles for breakfast you just say to hell with eating like a rabbit and trying to be healthy and just enjoy eating and doing what you want too even if it kills you.!
Isn?t that about what Arthur Jones did? If I recall he ate like crap and didn?t take care of of himself. I?m sure you couldn?t tell him a thing but he enjoyed his life while he had it.
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HeavyHitter32

entsminger wrote:
HeavyHitter32 wrote:
ATP 4 Vitality wrote:


I do not believe eating fried Twinkies sitting on the couch does much in the way of producing fitness.


I work with a 51-year-old guy who suffered a major heart attack a few months ago. He had gone into cardiac arrest and of course, required CPR to bring him back. The name of the major artery that was 100% blocked slips me, but it's on the left side of the heart and referred to as the widow maker. Lucky for him, he only required a stent and has recovered well.

However, he's in complete denial - still. He's 50 pounds over weight, has lost no weight, never has exercised, still eats crap (Pringles are his morning breakfast), and questions his doctors, all of the evidence of prevention, etc. His cholesterol was high when he had his heart attack and is now on a statin, but criticizes his doctor for putting him on it because of potential side effects. Yet at the same time I think he feels he can now eat whatever he wants because he's on the med. He debates me on many of the things discussed in this thread. Of course, if he did the right things he probably wouldn't even have to be on it.

I wouldn't doubt he's also eating fried Twinkies.

A lot of people just prefer to stick their head in the sand. Sad.

==Scott==
I've talked about a co-worker who had a heart attack because a chunk of plaque came loose and blocked the heart just like your friend.It was the widow maker heart attack. After stints and all he came back ok. After this incident he went on what he calls a sticks and grass diet. No junk, just healthy stuff plus he is on statins etc. His cholesterol was around 200 plus off the pills and about 60 0n them. One month he had to stop the pills for some availability reason and off the pills his cholesterol went back up to well over 200 and he was still eating like a rabbit.


I wonder how is other numbers are: glucose, triglycerides, etc. There is definitely a genetic aspect to an extent with cholesterol.
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HeavyHitter32

epdavis7 wrote:
Its kind of a crap shoot. My older brother (different father than me) had the widowmaker heart attack during a military PT test when he was 49. Luckily and thankfully he was surrounded by medical people and survived. He was healthy, fit and had no cholesterol, blood pressure, triglyceride, diabetes, obesity issues etc. Yes he did cardio all the time and strength trained also. Some things you can obviously control and some things its the roll of the dice.


True, it can happen...no guarantees...only risk reduction. People also need to keep an eye on their C-Reactive Protein and Lipoprotein(a).
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epdavis7

entsminger wrote:
epdavis7 wrote:
Its kind of a crap shoot. My older brother (different father than me) had the widowmaker heart attack during a military PT test when he was 49. Luckily and thankfully he was surrounded by medical people and survived. He was healthy, fit and had no cholesterol, blood pressure, triglyceride, diabetes, obesity issues etc. Yes he did cardio all the time and strength trained also. Some things you can obviously control and some things its the roll of the dice.

== Scott==
I guess that?s when like the guy who eats pringles for breakfast you just say to hell with eating like a rabbit and trying to be healthy and just enjoy eating and doing what you want too even if it kills you.!
Isn?t that about what Arthur Jones did? If I recall he ate like crap and didn?t take care of of himself. I?m sure you couldn?t tell him a thing but he enjoyed his life while he had it.


It's quite the paradox isn't it? Bodybuilding which is supposed to be the epitome of health and masculinity really isn't. So many of the guru's and competitors really don't take care of themselves from a health perspective (smoke, drink, use recreational drugs) and use PEDs. The "gay for pay" thing is a necessary evil to afford the financial means for the high quantities of steroids and HGH to compete at a national level. The whole concept is kind of silly if you think about it. Guys and girls getting on stage and oiling themselves up and posing with other guys and girls at less than healthy body fat percentages. If you haven't read the 'Muscle, Smoke and Mirrors' book series by Randy Roach, I highly recommend it. You have to go back to the days of Eugene Sandow to find a high level bodybuilder who did not use PEDs.

Say what you will about McGuff, but he is approaching this from a health perspective. First do no harm. Eat healthy, hydrate, get adequate rest and train hard. He is not saying to not be active between HIT sessions, but that as a result of having a strong healthy body you will naturally desire to be more active. He just doesn't prescribe something like "do two 30 minute sessions a week on the elliptical." He understands athletes will have to train specifically for their sport and that his method is not the ultimate bodybuilding routine. As we age the ability to be functional and independent becomes the most important thing. When the day comes that I quit doing long distance races, I'll still do my HIT session and walk daily (more for my mind and mood). I'll do other physical things I enjoy also depending on my health and physical capabilities at the time.





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ATP 4 Vitality

Just looked at this fake news report!

https://www.T-Nation.com/...a-waste-of-time

[aerobic-exercise-is-a-waste-of-time]

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/...pubmed/28871849



In fact, the correct conclusion of the study stated this.

In conclusion, significant reductions in fat mass were achieved by all experimental groups, but results were maximized by Resistance training and diet. Only the resistance training group showed significant increases in lean mass.

It is a shame that TC Luoma writes garbage about aerobics, and, calls people dunces. Sad also is his derogatory remarks about women. Perhaps he is the real dunce.





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epdavis7

I just ran a 10 mile race this weekend. Other than the elites you would be surprised at the number of pudgy runners finishing the race and some with times that were not too shabby. Most run moderately high mileage (20-25 miles weekly). Diet is key. Most recreational runners eat like crap and eat very high carb diets.
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