MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Killing Fat: Darden's New Book
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Ellington Darden

hit4me wrote:
Dr. Darden,

just a curiosity question...how long does it take for protein and fats got thru the digestive system versus carbohydrates.....I have found a big difference of eating a carb rich diet now compared to a protein and fat rich diet from previously, especially in the digestive tract

thx, dan


Dan,

Fats and proteins, compared to carbohydrates, require two to three times as long to move through the digestive system. In other words, carbs are faster to digest.

Ellington

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Tkelley18

Hey Dr. Darden,

Just wanted to get a better picture of the workout routine that goes along with the diet.

I understand the workouts and 30-10-30, but I'm having a hard time figuring out exactly what workouts I should be doing everyday and what the sets should look like. Is it a single set for every exercise? Is it 3 sets of 30-10-30 for each exercise?

Also, you have a daily breakdown of the diet but not of the workouts. I was wondering if there was more clarification on this, perhaps a week by week chart with the workouts for each day?

Super excited! Today is day one for me and my wife!

Thanks, TK
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Ellington Darden

Tkelley18 wrote:
Hey Dr. Darden,

Just wanted to get a better picture of the workout routine that goes along with the diet.

I understand the workouts and 30-10-30, but I'm having a hard time figuring out exactly what workouts I should be doing everyday and what the sets should look like. Is it a single set for every exercise? Is it 3 sets of 30-10-30 for each exercise?

Also, you have a daily breakdown of the diet but not of the workouts. I was wondering if there was more clarification on this, perhaps a week by week chart with the workouts for each day?

Super excited! Today is day one for me and my wife!

Thanks, TK


TK,

You and your wife need to reread Chapter 15. On page 199, it says to do one set of each exercise listed for Weeks 1 and 2. That's 30-10-30 for each of those six movements.

You train progressively twice a week, say Monday and Thursday. Do NOT do them more frequently than two times per week. You add a couple of exercises during Weeks 3 and 4, and two more during Weeks 5 and 6. Follow the listings on pages 199 and 200, or on pages 201-202.

Remember, one set of each exercise, not three sets. Apply 30-10-30 on each exercise. The routine should be hard and brief.

Ellington
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Tkelley18

Thank you so much. One more question though. How much would you recommend working out (both strength and cardio) on top of this program?

My wife and I are both in the military and are pretty active everyday. I'm just wondering what your recommendation would be for that.

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Ellington Darden

Tkelley18 wrote:
Thank you so much. One more question though. How much would you recommend working out (both strength and cardio) on top of this program?

My wife and I are both in the military and are pretty active everyday. I'm just wondering what your recommendation would be for that.



I don't recommend more involvement in strength training and cardio. Doing more will subtract from your recovery ability. The idea is to do less, get more rest and sleep, and cut your dietary calories. Thus, you lose fat and build muscle in the fastest possible way.

Ellington
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Tkelley18

With mandatory PT everyday, doing less is not really an option....

Do you have any suggestions for our type of life style?
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Ellington Darden

Tkelley18 wrote:
With mandatory PT everyday, doing less is not really an option....

Do you have any suggestions for our type of life style?


I do not believe my programs will help you lose fat and build muscle. They are based on practices that you cannot adhere to. Perhaps you can apply them at a later time in your life.

Ellington



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Tkelley18

What about all the athletes you talked about training in your book. One of your trainees was a high School football player. They workout almost every day... How did they succeed on your plan then?
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Ellington Darden

Tkelley18 wrote:
What about all the athletes you talked about training in your book. One of your trainees was a high School football player. They workout almost every day... How did they succeed on your plan then?


There's an old saying, "Burning the candle at both ends," that's related to what you are doing. If you are cutting way back on your dietary calories (to lose fat) and training hard with heavy resistance (to build muscle), you are already very close to burning the candle at both ends.

To prevent this from happening, you must rest and sleep more. Doing so helps your recovery ability.

But instead, if you do a lot of running, practicing, and training on your in-between days, your body will not succeed at losing fat and building muscle. Or it won't do so very efficiently. You'll probably lose more muscle than fat.

The young athletes I worked with were not training with me during their football or competitive seasons. They worked with me during their off-season months. Thus, they were able to listen, learn, and do less rather than more.

You will not be able to follow well in their footsteps. You are headed for problems if you light your candle at both ends, and then attempt to fire up the middle, too. Don't attempt to follow the Killing Fat plan unless you can apply it properly.

Do you understand better, now?

Ellington
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Tkelley18

I understand what you're saying.

So do you have any advice on what we should do? I mean we lead active life styles but we still want to lose the extra fat. We're not entirely concerned with building a lot of muscle, just trim the fat and stay in shape.

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Average Al

Tkelley18 wrote:
I understand what you're saying.

So do you have any advice on what we should do? I mean we lead active life styles but we still want to lose the extra fat. We're not entirely concerned with building a lot of muscle, just trim the fat and stay in shape.



I believe this book describes rapid weight loss programs.

If your current activity level/life style is incompatible with that, just try running a more modest calorie deficit, and settle for a lower rate of fat loss.
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Ellington Darden

Tkelley18 wrote:
I understand what you're saying.

So do you have any advice on what we should do? I mean we lead active life styles but we still want to lose the extra fat. We're not entirely concerned with building a lot of muscle, just trim the fat and stay in shape.



Gradually cut back on your dietary calories.

First, determine how many calories you eat on average most days. You'll have to record what you eat carefully and put it into one of those websites that counts calories for you. Do that for 3 or 4 days.

Once you get a number, say 3,200 calories, then cut back by 500 calories. On my Killing Fat plan, you'd reduce down to 1,600 -- which is too severe for you.

At 2,700-2,500 calories a day, you'll lose a pound of fat a week -- and still be able to do your daily PT.

Doing those few things should help you trim the fat and still be active.

Ellington


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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
Tkelley18 wrote:
What about all the athletes you talked about training in your book. One of your trainees was a high School football player. They workout almost every day... How did they succeed on your plan then?

There's an old saying, "Burning the candle at both ends," that's related to what you are doing. If you are cutting way back on your dietary calories (to lose fat) and training hard with heavy resistance (to build muscle), you are already very close to burning the candle at both ends.

To prevent this from happening, you must rest and sleep more. Doing so helps your recovery ability.

But instead, if you do a lot of running, practicing, and training on your in-between days, your body will not succeed at losing fat and building muscle. Or it won't do so very efficiently. You'll probably lose more muscle than fat.

The young athletes I worked with were not training with me during their football or competitive seasons. They worked with me during their off-season months. Thus, they were able to listen, learn, and do less rather than more.

You will not be able to follow well in their footsteps. You are headed for problems if you light your candle at both ends, and then attempt to fire up the middle, too. Don't attempt to follow the Killing Fat plan unless you can apply it properly.

Do you understand better, now?

Ellington


==Scott==
This response is why Dr.Darden is so great!I don't know of anywhere else where you could get a more honest and useful response to this kind of situation !
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hit4me

Florida, USA

Dr. Darden,

your opinion:

breakfast: 2 eggs, oatmeal with almond milk and blueberries

snack: banana with peanut butter

lunch: chicken breast, sweet potato, spinach/cucumber/tomato salad

snack: apple or orange with peanut butter

dinner: same as lunch

thx, dan
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parker1

Tkelley18 wrote:
Thank you so much. One more question though. How much would you recommend working out (both strength and cardio) on top of this program?

My wife and I are both in the military and are pretty active everyday. I'm just wondering what your recommendation would be for that.



First, thanks for your service!

If I could share: unfortunately, the methods Dr. Darden teaches don't compliment much of the training the military requires to perform your job.

After I got in, the workouts I performed to beat the standards for push ups, chins and of course timed runs day in, day out made an HIT session a couple of times pretty much impossible.

Plus, as an instructor pointed out: it didn't make sense to do HIT if you're trying to complete 80 push ups or 15 - 20 chins, or, finish a 1.5 mile run in 9 minutes. I did the Murph a couple of years ago and it was pretty much like the days I was in the military -- pretty much dropped the weights/HIT and focused on the Murph workouts.

Don't know if that helped or not.
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Average Al

parker1 wrote:
Tkelley18 wrote:
Thank you so much. One more question though. How much would you recommend working out (both strength and cardio) on top of this program?

My wife and I are both in the military and are pretty active everyday. I'm just wondering what your recommendation would be for that.



First, thanks for your service!

If I could share: unfortunately, the methods Dr. Darden teaches don't compliment much of the training the military requires to perform your job.

After I got in, the workouts I performed to beat the standards for push ups, chins and of course timed runs day in, day out made an HIT session a couple of times pretty much impossible.

Plus, as an instructor pointed out: it didn't make sense to do HIT if you're trying to complete 80 push ups or 15 - 20 chins, or, finish a 1.5 mile run in 9 minutes. I did the Murph a couple of years ago and it was pretty much like the days I was in the military -- pretty much dropped the weights/HIT and focused on the Murph workouts.

Don't know if that helped or not.


I understand that the fitness tests are being changed.
- leg tuck/curl instead of sit-ups
- 10 lb medicine ball throw backwards and over your head for at least 14.5 feet
- trap bar deadlift for three reps (170 lb minimum)
- pushups where you have to unload the hands after every rep, and start with chest on the dirt.
- shuttle sprint drag carry drill
- 2 mile run in less than 19:30.

Seems more functional and more strength oriented.
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Average Al

parker1 wrote:
Tkelley18 wrote:
Thank you so much. One more question though. How much would you recommend working out (both strength and cardio) on top of this program?

My wife and I are both in the military and are pretty active everyday. I'm just wondering what your recommendation would be for that.



First, thanks for your service!

If I could share: unfortunately, the methods Dr. Darden teaches don't compliment much of the training the military requires to perform your job.

After I got in, the workouts I performed to beat the standards for push ups, chins and of course timed runs day in, day out made an HIT session a couple of times pretty much impossible.

Plus, as an instructor pointed out: it didn't make sense to do HIT if you're trying to complete 80 push ups or 15 - 20 chins, or, finish a 1.5 mile run in 9 minutes. I did the Murph a couple of years ago and it was pretty much like the days I was in the military -- pretty much dropped the weights/HIT and focused on the Murph workouts.

Don't know if that helped or not.


I understand that the fitness tests are being changed.
- leg tuck/curl instead of sit-ups
- 10 lb medicine ball throw backwards and over your head for at least 14.5 feet
- trap bar deadlift for three reps (170 lb minimum)
- pushups where you have to unload the hands after every rep, and start with chest on the dirt.
- shuttle sprint drag carry drill
- 2 mile run in less than 19:30.

Seems more functional and more strength oriented.
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parker1

Average Al wrote:
parker1
I understand that the fitness tests are being changed.
- leg tuck/curl instead of sit-ups
- 10 lb medicine ball throw backwards and over your head for at least 14.5 feet
- trap bar deadlift for three reps (170 lb minimum)
- pushups where you have to unload the hands after every rep, and start with chest on the dirt.
- shuttle sprint drag carry drill
- 2 mile run in less than 19:30.

Seems more functional and more strength oriented.


Depends on the branch of service, from what I understand.

A couple of years ago, I talked with some Green Berets at a restaurant who were stationed at a joint base where I'd been assigned when I was in. We talked about their workouts vs. mine from back in the day...they said that was "old school" and their training was much more of a cross-fit style (not saying Crossfit, as they had a saner/safer selection of exercises from what I understood).

But, the Marine Corps PFT is still three events: pull-ups , abdominal crunches, and a 3-mile run. And of course, the legendary crucible. The Rangers' Fitness Test is currently 58 push-ups, 69 sit-ups and a five-mile run in 40 minutes or less, and, six pull-ups, along with the Water Survival Assessment. The whole thing wraps up with a 12-mile march with a 35-pound rucksack and weapon in less than three hours.

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